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Storming Of The Bastille
The Storming of the Bastille
Bastille
(French: Prise de la Bastille
Bastille
[pʁiz də la bastij]) occurred in Paris, France, on the afternoon of 14 July 1789. The medieval fortress, armory, and political prison in Paris known as the Bastille
Bastille
represented royal authority in the centre of Paris
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Champ De Mars, Paris
The Champ de Mars
Champ de Mars
(French pronunciation: ​[ʃɑ̃ də maʁs] ; English: Field of Mars) is a large public greenspace in Paris, France, located in the seventh arrondissement, between the Eiffel Tower
Eiffel Tower
to the northwest and the École Militaire
École Militaire
to the southeast. The park is named after the Campus Martius
Campus Martius
("Mars Field") in Rome, a tribute to the Latin name of the Roman God of war. The name also alludes to the fact that the lawns here were formerly used as drilling and marching grounds by the French military. The nearest Métro stations are La Motte-Picquet–Grenelle, École Militaire, and Champ de Mars-Tour Eiffel, an RER suburban-commuter-railway station
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La Galissonnière
Roland-Michel Barrin de La Galissonière, Marquis de La Galissonière, sometimes spelled Galissonnière, (French pronunciation: ​[ʁolɑ̃ miʃɛl baʁɛ̃ də la galisɔnjɛʁ]; 1693–1756) was the French governor of New France from 1747 to 1749 and the victor in the Battle of Minorca in 1756.Contents1 New France 2 Menorca 3 Scientific interests 4 Honours 5 Legacy 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksNew France[edit] La Galissonière had family connections to New France
France
as his mother was a sister of Michel Bégon, the intendant from 1712 to 1726. He also married Marie-Catherine-Antoinette de Lauzon, a relative of Jean de Lauzon, the Governor of New France
France
from 1651 to 1657. La Galissonière was a naval commander who reluctantly accepted the position of Governor due to military necessity
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Jean-Pierre Houël
Jean-Pierre-Louis-Laurent Houël (28 June 1735 – 14 November 1813) was a French painter, engraver and draftsman. During his long life Houël witnessed the reign of Louis XV, the French Revolution, and the period of Napoleon's First Empire. Biography[edit] He was born at Rouen
Rouen
into a family of prosperous artisans, who sent him to the city's drawing academy when he was fifteen. Here he was exposed to the art of early Dutch and Flemish painters, which was to have a defining impact on his chosen specialty of landscape painting. In 1758 Houël published a book of landscape engravings, and in 1768 he painted six views of the Duc de Choiseul's property. The following year his influential patrons secured a place for him at the French Academy in Rome
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François Mignet
François Auguste Marie Mignet (8 May 1796 – 24 March 1884) was a French journalist and historian of the French Revolution. Biography[edit] He was born in Aix-en-Provence
Aix-en-Provence
(Bouches-du-Rhône), France. His father was a locksmith from the Vendée, who enthusiastically accepted the principles of the French Revolution
French Revolution
and encouraged liberal ideas in his son. François had brilliant success at Avignon
Avignon
in the lycée where he became a teacher in 1815. He returned to Aix to study law, and in 1818 was called to the bar, where his eloquence would have ensured his success had he not been more interested in the study of history
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Palais-Royal
The Palais-Royal
Palais-Royal
(French pronunciation: ​[pa.lɛ ʁwa.jal]), originally called the Palais-Cardinal, is a former royal palace located in the 1st arrondissement of Paris, France. The screened entrance court faces the Place du Palais-Royal, opposite the Louvre. The larger inner courtyard, the Cour d'Honneur, has since 1986 contained Daniel Buren's site-specific art piece Les Deux Plateaux, known as Les Colonnes de Buren. In 1830 the Cour d'Honneur was enclosed to the north by what was probably the most famous of Paris's covered arcades, the Galerie d'Orléans
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Prison De L'Abbaye
The prison de l’Abbaye was a Paris
Paris
prison in use from 1522 to 1854. The final building was built by Gamard in 1631 and made up of three floors, flanked by two turrets and an échauguette. It was the scene of one of the bloodiest episodes of the French Revolution. Madame Roland, wife of the Girondin
Girondin
Minister of the Interior Jean-Marie Roland, was interned here on her first arrest in 1793 before being transferred to Sainte Pélagie.Contents1 History1.1 Pre-Revolution 1.2 Massacres 1.3 DestructionHistory[edit] Pre-Revolution[edit] It occupied part of the current site of boulevard Saint-Germain in the corner of the enclosire of Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés
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Grenadiers
A grenadier (/ˌɡrɛnəˈdɪər/, French pronunciation: ​[ɡʁə.na.dje]; derived from the word grenade[1]) was originally a specialized soldier, first established as a distinct role in the mid-to-late 17th century, for the throwing of grenades and sometimes assault operations. At that time grenadiers were chosen from the strongest and largest soldiers. By the 18th century, dedicated grenade throwing of this sort was no longer relevant, but grenadiers were still chosen for being the most physically powerful soldiers and would lead assaults in the field of battle
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Privy Council
A privy council is a body that advises the head of state of a nation, typically, but not always, in the context of a monarchic government. The word "privy" means "private" or "secret"; thus, a privy council was originally a committee of the monarch's closest advisors to give confidential advice on state affairs.Contents1 Privy councils1.1 Functioning privy councils 1.2 Former or dormant privy councils2 See also 3 ReferencesPrivy councils[edit] Functioning privy councils[edit] Belgium: Crown Council of Belgium  Bhutan: Privy Council of Bhutan  Brunei: Privy Council of Brunei  Canada: Queen's Privy Council for Canada  Cambodia: Supreme Privy Council of His Majesty the King of Cambodia  Denmark: Danish Council of State  
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Victor-François, 2nd Duc De Broglie
Victor François de Broglie, 2nd duc de Broglie (19 October 1718 – 30 March 1804) was a French aristocrat and soldier and a marshal of France. He served with his father, François-Marie, 1st duc de Broglie, at Parma and Guastalla, and in 1734 obtained a colonelcy.[1] In the War of the Austrian Succession
War of the Austrian Succession
he took part in the storming of Prague
Prague
in 1742, and was made a brigadier. In 1744 and 1745 he saw further service on the Rhine, and he succeeded his father as 2nd duc de Broglie on the old duke's death in 1745. He was made a Maréchal de Camp, and he subsequently served with Marshal de Saxe in the Low Countries, and was present at Roucoux, Val and Maastricht
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Paul François De Quelen, Duc De La Vauguyon
Paul François de Quelen de La Vauguyon or Paul François de Quélen de Stuer de Caussade, duc de La Vauguyon (30 July 1746, Paris
Paris
– 14 March 1828, Paris) was a French nobleman. He was governor of Cognac, after having been involved in the last campaigns of the Seven Years' War. He wrote a Portrait de feu monseigneur le Dauphin and was menin to the future Louis XVI, one of the Dauphin's sons. A peer of France, brigadier, maréchal de camp, knight of the ordre du Saint-Esprit, he was chosen to be minister plenipotentiary to the Estates General of the Dutch Republic. He later became French ambassador to Spain, knight of the Golden Fleece, temporary minister of foreign affairs in 1789, then minister of the conseil d'État of Louis XVIII in Verona. He was the main intermediary among Louis's agents in France, but became the victim of intrigues
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France In The American Revolutionary War
French involvement in the American Revolutionary War
American Revolutionary War
began in 1775, when France, a rival of the British Empire, secretly shipped supplies to the Continental Army. A Treaty of Alliance in 1778 soon followed, which led to shipments of money and matériel to the United States. Subsequently, the Spanish Empire
Spanish Empire
and the Dutch Republic
Dutch Republic
also began to send assistance, leaving the British Empire
British Empire
with no allies. France's help is considered a vital and decisive contribution to the United States' victory against the British
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Louis Pierre De Chastenet De Puységur
Puységur or Puysegur may refer to:Places Puységur, Gers
Puységur, Gers
is a French commune in the département of Gers Puysegur Point, South Island, New Zealand Puysegur Trench, an ocean trench off the New Zealand coastPeople
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César Guillaume De La Luzerne
César-Guillaume La Luzerne (7 July 1738 - 21 June 1821) was a Roman Catholic clergyman. He was a minor statesman of the French Revolution, and a cardinal and important figure of the Bourbon Restoration.Contents1 Family and early life 2 Bishop of Langres 3 French Revolution 4 Works 5 ReferencesFamily and early life[edit] La Luzerne's family was one of the most illustrious of the Normandy. His father Cesar-Antoine, was a Maréchal de camp in the king's army, his mother was Marie-Elisabeth de Lamoignon de Blancmesnil (1716-1758), the daughter of Lord Chancellor Lamoignon (served 1750-1768) and the sister of the extraordinary Secretary of State Malesherbes. His brothers were César Henri, comte de La Luzerne, Naval Minister (1787-1790) and Anne-César, ambassador to the United States and to the court of London
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Palace Of Versailles
The Palace of Versailles
Palace of Versailles
(French: Château
Château
de Versailles), or simply Versailles (English: /vɛərˈsaɪ/ vair-SY or /vərˈsaɪ/ vər-SY; French: [vɛʁsaj]), is a royal château in Versailles in the Île-de-France
Île-de-France
region of France. It is now open as a museum and is a very popular tourist attraction. When the château was built, the community of Versailles was a small village dating from the 11th century. Today, however, it is a wealthy suburb of Paris, some 20 kilometres (12 mi) southwest of the centre of the French capital.[1] Versailles was the seat of political power in the Kingdom of France
France
from 1682, when King Louis XIV
Louis XIV
moved the royal court from Paris, until the royal family was forced to return to the capital in October 1789, within three months after the beginning of the French Revolution
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Sèvres
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Sèvres
Sèvres
(French pronunciation: [sɛvʁə] ( listen)) is a commune in the southwestern suburbs of Paris, France
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