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Storm-god
A weather god is a deity in mythology associated with weather phenomena such as thunder, lightning, rain and wind. They feature commonly in polytheistic religions, frequently as the head of the pantheon. Storm gods are conceived of as wielding thunder and lightning. They are typically male, powerful and irascible rulers. Notable examples include the Indo-European deities derived from the Proto-Indo-European Dyeus.[1] The Indo-European storm god is sometimes imagined as distinct from the ruling sky god. In these cases, he has names separate from the Dyeus
Dyeus
etymon, either Perkwunos[2] or Taran.[3] Storm gods[edit]Adad, the Assyrian storm god. Ara Tiotio, Māori god of tornadoes and whirlwinds. Audros, the Lithuanian god of storms. Baʿal, the Canaanite & Phoenician storm, fertility, & war god
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Jupiter (mythology)
Jupiter, also known as Jove (Latin: Iūpiter [ˈjuːpɪtɛr] or Iuppiter [ˈjʊppɪtɛr],[1] gen. Iovis [ˈjɔwɪs]), is the god of the sky and thunder and king of the gods in Ancient Roman religion
Ancient Roman religion
and mythology. Jupiter
Jupiter
was the chief deity of Roman state religion throughout the Republican and Imperial eras, until Christianity became the dominant religion of the Empire. In Roman mythology, he negotiates with Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome, to establish principles of Roman religion such as offering, or sacrifice. Jupiter
Jupiter
is usually thought to have originated as a sky god. His identifying implement is the thunderbolt and his primary sacred animal is the eagle,[2] which held precedence over other birds in the taking of auspices[3] and became one of the most common symbols of the Roman army (see Aquila)
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Religion In Ancient Rome
Religion in Ancient Rome
Ancient Rome
includes the ancestral ethnic religion of the city of Rome
Rome
that the Romans used to define themselves as a people, as well as the religious practices of peoples brought under Roman rule, in so far as they became widely followed in Rome
Rome
and Italy. The Romans thought of themselves as highly religious, and attributed their success as a world power to their collective piety (pietas) in maintaining good relations with the gods
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Aztec
Aztec
Aztec
culture (/ˈæztɛk/), was a Mesoamerican culture that flourished in central Mexico
Mexico
in the post-classic period from 1300 to 1521, during the time in which a triple alliance of the Mexica, Texcoca and Tepaneca tribes established the Aztec
Aztec
empire. The Aztec people were certain ethnic groups of central Mexico, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl
Nahuatl
language and who dominated large parts of Mesoamerica
Mesoamerica
from the 14th to the 16th centuries. Aztec
Aztec
culture is the culture of the people referred to as Aztecs, but since most ethnic groups of central Mexico
Mexico
in the postclassic period shared basic cultural traits, many of the traits that characterize Aztec
Aztec
culture cannot be said to be exclusive to the Aztecs
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Hadad
Hadad
Hadad
(Ugaritic: 𐎅𐎄 Haddu), Adad, Haddad
Haddad
(Akkadian) or Iškur (Sumerian) was the storm and rain god in the Northwest Semitic and ancient Mesopotamian religions. He was attested in Ebla
Ebla
as "Hadda" in c. 2500 BCE.[1][2] From the Levant, Hadad
Hadad
was introduced to Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
by the Amorites, where he became known as the Akkadian (Assyrian-Babylonian) god Adad.[3][4][5][6] Adad
Adad
and Iškur are usually written with the logogram 𒀭𒅎 dIM[7]—the same symbol used for the Hurrian god Teshub.[8] Hadad
Hadad
was also called "Pidar", "Rapiu", "Baal-Zephon",[9] or often simply Baʿal
Baʿal
(Lord), but this title was also used for other gods. The bull was the symbolic animal of Hadad
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Aramaean Religion
Canaanite religion
Canaanite religion
refers to the group of Ancient Semitic religions practiced by the Canaanites
Canaanites
living in the ancient
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Horus
Horus
Horus
is one of the most significant ancient Egyptian deities. He was worshipped from at least the late prehistoric Egypt until the Ptolemaic Kingdom
Ptolemaic Kingdom
and Roman Egypt
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Ancient Egyptian Religion
Ancient Egyptian religion
Ancient Egyptian religion
was a complex system of polytheistic beliefs and rituals which were an integral part of ancient Egyptian society. It centered on the Egyptians' interaction with many deities who were believed to be present in, and in control of, the forces of nature. Rituals such as prayers and offerings were efforts to provide for the gods and gain their favor. Formal religious practice centered on the pharaoh, the ruler of Egypt, who was believed to possess a divine power by virtue of their position. He acted as the intermediary between their people and the gods and was obligated to sustain the gods through rituals and offerings so that they could maintain order in the universe. The state dedicated enormous resources to Egyptian rituals and to the construction of the temples. Individuals could interact with the gods for their own purposes, appealing for their help through prayer or compelling them to act through magic
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Pharaoh
Pharaoh
Pharaoh
(/ˈfeɪ.roʊ/, /fɛr.oʊ/[1][2] or /fær.oʊ/;[2] Coptic: ⲡⲣ̅ⲣⲟ Prro) is the common title of the monarchs of ancient Egypt from the First Dynasty (c. 3150 BCE) until the annexation of Egypt by the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in 30 BCE,[3] although the actual term "Pharaoh" was not used contemporaneously for a ruler until circa 1200 BCE. In the early dynasty, ancient Egyptian kings used to have up to three titles, the Horus, the Nesu Bety, and the Nebty name. The Golden Horus
Horus
and Nomen and prenomen titles were later added. In Egyptian society, religion was central to everyday life. One of the roles of the pharaoh was as an intermediary between the gods and the people. The pharaoh thus deputised for the gods; his role was both as civil and religious administrator
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Huracán
Huracan[1] (/ˈhʊrəkən, ˈhʊrəˌkɑːn/; Spanish: Huracán; Mayan languages: Hunraqan, "one legged"), often referred to as U K'ux Kaj, the "Heart of Sky",[2] is a K'iche' Maya god of wind, storm, fire and one of the creator deities who participated in all three attempts at creating humanity.[3] He also caused the Great Flood after the second generation of humans angered the gods. He supposedly lived in the windy mists above the floodwaters and repeatedly invoked "earth" until land came up from the seas. His name, understood as 'One-Leg', suggests god K of Postclassic and Classic Maya iconography, a deity of lightning with one human leg,[4] and one leg shaped like a serpent. God K
God K
is commonly referred to as Bolon Tzacab and K'awiil or Kauil. The name may ultimately derive from huracan, a Carib word,[5] and the source of the words hurricane and orcan (European windstorm)
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K'iche' People
1,610,013[1] 11% of Guatemalan population[1]Regions with significant populations Guatemala 1,610,013[1]Quiché 622,163[1]Totonicapán 453,237[1]Quetzaltenango 205,228[1]Sololá 151,992[1]LanguagesK'iche', SpanishReligionCatholic, Evangelicalist, Maya religionRelated ethnic groupsKaqchikel, Tzutujil, Uspantek, SakapultekK'iche' (pronounced [kʼi ˈtʃeʔ]; previous Spanish spelling: Quiché)[2] are indigenous peoples of the Americas and are one of the Maya peoples. The K'iche' language is a Mesoamerican language in the Mayan language family. The highland K'iche' states in the pre-Columbian era are associated with the ancient Maya civilization, and reached the peak of their power and influence during the Postclassic period. The meaning of the word K'iche' is "many trees." The Nahuatl
Nahuatl
translation, Cuauhtēmallān "Place of the Many Trees (People)", is the origin of the word Guatemala
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Indra
Indra
Indra
(/ˈɪndrə/, Sanskrit: इन्द्र) is a Vedic deity in Hinduism,[1] a guardian deity in Buddhism,[2] and the king of the highest heaven called Saudharmakalpa in Jainism.[3] His mythologies and powers are similar, though not identical to those of the Indo-European deities such as Zeus, Jupiter, Perun, Thor, and Odin (Wotan).[1][4][5] In the Vedas, Indra
Indra
is the king of Svarga
Svarga
(Heaven) and the Devas. He is the god of the heavens, lightning, thunder, storms, rains and river flows.[6] Indra
Indra
is the most referred to deity in the Rigveda.[7] He is celebrated for his powers, and the one who kills the great symbolic evil (Asura) named Vritra
Vritra
who obstructs human prosperity and happiness
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Hinduism
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Juracán
Juracán
Juracán
is the phonetic name given by the Spanish colonizers to the zemi or deity of chaos and disorder which the Taíno natives in Puerto Rico, Hispaniola, Jamaica, and Cuba, as well as the Island Caribs
Island Caribs
and Arawak natives elsewhere in the Caribbean, believed controlled the weather, particularly hurricanes (the latter word derives from the deity's name). Actually, the word "juracán" merely represented the storms per se, which according to Taíno mythology were spawned and controlled by the goddess Guabancex, also known as the "one whose fury destroys everything". The Taínos were aware of the spiraling wind pattern of hurricanes, a knowledge that they used when depicting the deity
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Zapotec Civilization
The Zapotec civilization
Zapotec civilization
was an indigenous pre-Columbian civilization that flourished in the Valley of Oaxaca
Oaxaca
in Mesoamerica. Archaeological evidence shows that their culture goes back at least 2,500 years. The Zapotec left archaeological evidence at the ancient city of Monte Albán in the form of buildings, ball courts, magnificent tombs and grave goods including finely worked gold jewelry
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K'awiil
K'awiil, in the Post-Classic codices corresponding to God K, is a Maya deity identified with lightning, serpents, fertility and maize. He is characterized by a zoomorphic head, with large eyes, long, upturned snout and attenuated serpent tooth.[1] A torch, stone celt, or cigar, normally emitting smoke, comes out of his forehead, while a serpent leg represents a lightning bolt. In this way, K'awiil
K'awiil
personifies the lightning axe both of the rain deity and of the king as depicted on his stelae.Contents1 Names 2 Narratives and scenes 3 Functions 4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyNames[edit] From the correspondence between Landa's description of the New Year rituals and the depiction of these rituals in the Dresden Codex,[2] it can be inferred that in 16th-century Yucatán, K'awiil
K'awiil
was called Bolon Dzacab 'Innumerable (bolon 'nine, innumerable') maternal generations', perhaps a metaphor for fertility
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