HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Stone Carving
Stone carving
Stone carving
is an activity where pieces of rough natural stone are shaped by the controlled removal of stone. Owing to the permanence of the material, stone work has survived which was created during our prehistory. Work carried out by paleolithic societies to create flint tools is more often referred to as knapping. Stone carving
Stone carving
that is done to produce lettering is more often referred to as lettering. The process of removing stone from the earth is called mining or quarrying. Stone carving
Stone carving
is one of the processes which may be used by an artist when creating a sculpture. The term also refers to the activity of masons in dressing stone blocks for use in architecture, building or civil engineering
[...More...]

picture info

Brooklyn Museum
The Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Museum is an art museum located in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. At 560,000 square feet (52,000 m2), the museum is New York City's third largest in physical size and holds an art collection with roughly 1.5 million works.[2] Located near the Prospect Heights, Crown Heights, Flatbush, and Park Slope neighborhoods of Brooklyn
Brooklyn
and founded in 1895, the Beaux-Arts building, designed by McKim, Mead and White, was planned to be the largest art museum in the world. The museum initially struggled to maintain its building and collection, only to be revitalized in the late 20th century, thanks to major renovations. Significant areas of the collection include antiquities, specifically their collection of Egyptian antiquities
Egyptian antiquities
spanning over 3,000 years
[...More...]

picture info

Laser
A laser is a device that emits light through a process of optical amplification based on the stimulated emission of electromagnetic radiation. The term "laser" originated as an acronym for "light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation".[1][2] The first laser was built in 1960 by Theodore H. Maiman
Theodore H. Maiman
at Hughes Research Laboratories, based on theoretical work by Charles Hard Townes
Charles Hard Townes
and Arthur Leonard Schawlow. A laser differs from other sources of light in that it emits light coherently, spatially and temporally. Spatial coherence
Spatial coherence
allows a laser to be focused to a tight spot, enabling applications such as laser cutting and lithography. Spatial coherence
Spatial coherence
also allows a laser beam to stay narrow over great distances (collimation), enabling applications such as laser pointers
[...More...]

picture info

Bronze
Bronze
Bronze
is an alloy consisting primarily of copper, commonly with about 12% tin and often with the addition of other metals (such as aluminium, manganese, nickel or zinc) and sometimes non-metals or metalloids such as arsenic, phosphorus or silicon. These additions produce a range of alloys that may be harder than copper alone, or have other useful properties, such as stiffness, ductility, or machinability. The archeological period where bronze was the hardest metal in widespread use is known as the Bronze
Bronze
Age. The beginning of the Bronze Age in Western Eurasia
Eurasia
and South Asia
Asia
is conventionally dated to the mid-4th millennium BC, and to the early 2nd millennium BC in China;[1] everywhere it gradually spread across regions
[...More...]

picture info

Hardness
Hardness
Hardness
is a measure of the resistance to localized plastic deformation induced by either mechanical indentation or abrasion. Some materials (e.g. metals) are harder than others (e.g
[...More...]

picture info

Ductile
Ductility
Ductility
is a measure of a material's ability to undergo significant plastic deformation before rupture, which may be expressed as percent elongation or percent area reduction from a tensile test. According to Shigley's Mechanical Engineering Design--10th Ed. [1] significant denotes about 5.0 percent elongation (Section 5.3, p. 233). See also Eq. 2-12, p. 50 for definitions of percent elongation and percent area reduction. Ductility
Ductility
is often characterized by the material's ability to be stretched into a wire. From examination of data in Tables A20, A21, A22, A23, and A24 in Shigley's Mechanical Engineering Design--10th Edition [1] for both ductile and brittle materials, it is possible to postulate a broader quantifiable definition of ductility that does not rely on percent elongation alone
[...More...]

picture info

Silicon Carbide
Silicon
Silicon
carbide (SiC), also known as carborundum /kɑːrbəˈrʌndəm/, is a semiconductor containing silicon and carbon. It occurs in nature as the extremely rare mineral moissanite. Synthetic SiC powder has been mass-produced since 1893 for use as an abrasive. Grains of silicon carbide can be bonded together by sintering to form very hard ceramics that are widely used in applications requiring high endurance, such as car brakes, car clutches and ceramic plates in bulletproof vests. Electronic applications of silicon carbide such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and detectors in early radios were first demonstrated around 1907. SiC is used in semiconductor electronics devices that operate at high temperatures or high voltages, or both
[...More...]

picture info

Milos
Milos
Milos
or Melos
Melos
(/ˈmɛlɒs, -oʊs, ˈmiːlɒs, -loʊs/; Modern Greek: Μήλος [ˈmilos]; Ancient Greek: Μῆλος Melos) is a volcanic Greek island
Greek island
in the Aegean Sea, just north of the Sea of Crete. Milos is the southwesternmost island in the Cyclades
Cyclades
group. The island is famous for the statue of Aphrodite
Aphrodite
(the "Venus de Milo", now in the Louvre), and also for statues of the Greek god Asclepius (now in the British Museum[2]), the Poseidon
Poseidon
and an archaic Apollo
Apollo
in Athens. Milos
Milos
is a popular tourist destination during the summer. The Municipality of Milos
Milos
also includes the uninhabited offshore islands of Antimilos
Antimilos
and Akradies
[...More...]

picture info

Iron
Iron
Iron
is a chemical element with symbol Fe (from Latin: ferrum) and atomic number 26. It is a metal in the first transition series. It is by mass the most common element on Earth, forming much of Earth's outer and inner core. It is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust. Its abundance in rocky planets like Earth
Earth
is due to its abundant production by fusion in high-mass stars, where it is the last element to be produced with release of energy before the violent collapse of a supernova, which scatters the iron into space. Like the other group 8 elements, ruthenium and osmium, iron exists in a wide range of oxidation states, −2 to +7, although +2 and +3 are the most common. Elemental iron occurs in meteoroids and other low oxygen environments, but is reactive to oxygen and water. Fresh iron surfaces appear lustrous silvery-gray, but oxidize in normal air to give hydrated iron oxides, commonly known as rust
[...More...]

picture info

Tempering (metallurgy)
Tempering is a process of heat treating, which is used to increase the toughness of iron-based alloys. Tempering is usually performed after hardening, to reduce some of the excess hardness, and is done by heating the metal to some temperature below the critical point for a certain period of time, then allowing it to cool in still air. The exact temperature determines the amount of hardness removed, and depends on both the specific composition of the alloy and on the desired properties in the finished product
[...More...]

picture info

Water Jet Cutter
A water jet cutter, also known as a water jet or waterjet, is an industrial tool capable of cutting a wide variety of materials using a very high-pressure jet of water, or a mixture of water and an abrasive substance. The term abrasive jet refers specifically to the use of a mixture of water and abrasive to cut hard materials such as metal or granite, while the terms pure waterjet and water-only cutting refer to waterjet cutting without the use of added abrasives, often used for softer materials such as wood or rubber.[1] Waterjet cutting is often used during fabrication of machine parts. It is the preferred method when the materials being cut are sensitive to the high temperatures generated by other methods
[...More...]

picture info

Oxyacetylene
Oxy-fuel welding (commonly called oxyacetylene welding, oxy welding, or gas welding in the U.S.) and oxy-fuel cutting are processes that use fuel gases and oxygen to weld and cut metals, respectively. French engineers Edmond Fouché and Charles Picard became the first to develop oxygen-acetylene welding in 1903.[1] Pure oxygen, instead of air, is used to increase the flame temperature to allow localized melting of the workpiece material (e.g. steel) in a room environment. A common propane/air flame burns at about 2,250 K (1,980 °C; 3,590 °F),[2] a propane/oxygen flame burns at about 2,526 K (2,253 °C; 4,087 °F),[3] an oxyhydrogen flame burns at 3,073 K (2,800 °C; 5,072 °F), and an acetylene/oxygen flame burns at about 3,773 K (3,500 °C; 6,332 °F).[4] Oxy-fuel is one of the oldest welding processes, besides forge welding
[...More...]

picture info

Crazy Horse Memorial
The Crazy Horse
Crazy Horse
Memorial is a mountain monument under construction on privately held land in the Black Hills, in Custer County, South Dakota, United States. It will depict the Oglala Lakota
Oglala Lakota
warrior, Crazy Horse, riding a horse and pointing into the distance. The memorial was commissioned by Henry Standing Bear, a Lakota elder, to be sculpted by Korczak Ziolkowski. It is operated by the Crazy Horse
Crazy Horse
Memorial Foundation, a nonprofit organization. The memorial master plan includes the mountain carving monument, an Indian Museum of North America, and a Native American Cultural Center. The monument is being carved out of Thunderhead Mountain, on land considered sacred by some Oglala Lakota, between Custer and Hill City, roughly 17 miles (27 km) from Mount Rushmore. The sculpture's final dimensions are planned to be 641 feet (195 m) wide and 563 feet (172 m) high
[...More...]

picture info

Limestone
Limestone
Limestone
is a sedimentary rock, composed mainly of skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral, forams and molluscs. Its major materials are the minerals calcite and aragonite, which are different crystal forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). About 10% of sedimentary rocks are limestones. The solubility of limestone in water and weak acid solutions leads to karst landscapes, in which water erodes the limestone over thousands to millions of years
[...More...]

picture info

Mount Rushmore
Mount Rushmore National Memorial
Mount Rushmore National Memorial
is a sculpture carved into the granite face of Mount Rushmore, a batholith in the Black Hills
Black Hills
in Keystone, South Dakota, United States
[...More...]

picture info

Confederate Memorial Park (Albany, Georgia)
The Confederate Memorial Park in Albany, Georgia, United States
United States
is located on Philema Road across from Chehaw Park.[1] The stone monument to Albany's Confederate veterans from the American Civil War was originally located in downtown Albany in the middle of the intersection of Jackson Street and Pine Avenue. It was moved several times, first to the grounds of the Albany Municipal Auditorium, then to Oakview Cemetery, and finally to its present location. It was rededicated on January 22, 2000.[2] An inscription on one side of the monument reads:They Fought Not For Conquest, But For Liberty And Their Own Homes.The park is owned and maintained by the Sons of Confederate Veterans and the United Daughters of the Confederacy. References[edit]^ "Confederate Memorial Park". Albany Convention & Visitors Bureau. Retrieved 25 May 2016.  ^ Wiggins, David (2006). Georgia's Confederate Monuments and Cemeteries. Arcadia Publishing
[...More...]

.