HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Stoics
Stoicism
Stoicism
is a school of Hellenistic philosophy
Hellenistic philosophy
that flourished throughout the Roman and Greek world until the 3rd century AD. Zeno of Citium founded stoicism in Athens
Athens
in the early 3rd century BC. It was heavily influenced by certain teachings of Socrates, while stoic physics are largely drawn from the teachings of the philosopher Heraclitus
[...More...]

"Stoics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Diodorus Cronus
Diodorus Cronus (Greek: Διόδωρος Κρόνος; died c. 284 BCE)[1] was a Greek philosopher and dialectician connected to the Megarian school. He was most notable for logic innovations, including his master argument formulated in response to Aristotle's discussion of future contingents.Contents1 Life 2 Philosophy2.1 Master argument3 Notes 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksLife[edit] Diodorus was a son of Ameinias of Iasus in Caria. He lived at the court of Alexandria
Alexandria
in the reign of Ptolemy I Soter, who is said to have given him the surname of Cronus ("old fogey"[2]) on account of his inability to solve at once some dialectic problem proposed by Stilpo, when the two philosophers were dining with the king
[...More...]

"Diodorus Cronus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Epictetus
Epictetus
Epictetus
(/ˌɛpɪkˈtiːtəs/;[1] Greek: Ἐπίκτητος, Epíktētos; c. AD 55 – 135) was a Greek Stoic philosopher. He was born a slave at Hierapolis, Phrygia
Phrygia
(present day Pamukkale, Turkey) and lived in Rome
Rome
until his banishment, when he went to Nicopolis
Nicopolis
in northwestern Greece
Greece
for the rest of his life. His teachings were written down and published by his pupil Arrian
Arrian
in his Discourses and Enchiridion. Epictetus
Epictetus
taught that philosophy is a way of life and not just a theoretical discipline. To Epictetus, all external events are beyond our control; we should accept calmly and dispassionately whatever happens
[...More...]

"Epictetus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Emotion
Emotion
Emotion
is any conscious experience[1][2][3] characterized by intense mental activity and a certain degree of pleasure or displeasure.[4][5] Scientific discourse has drifted to other meanings and there is no consensus on a definition. Emotion
Emotion
is often intertwined with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, and motivation.[6] In some theories, cognition is an important aspect of emotion. Those acting primarily on the emotions they are feeling may seem as if they are not thinking, but mental processes are still essential, particularly in the interpretation of events. For example, the realization of our believing that we are in a dangerous situation and the subsequent arousal of our body's nervous system (rapid heartbeat and breathing, sweating, muscle tension) is integral to the experience of our feeling afraid. Other theories, however, claim that emotion is separate from and can precede cognition. Emotions are complex
[...More...]

"Emotion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ethics
Ethics
Ethics
or moral philosophy is a branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct.[1] The term ethics derives from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
ἠθικός (ethikos), from ἦθος (ethos), meaning 'habit, custom'. The branch of philosophy axiology comprises the sub-branches of ethics and aesthetics, each concerned with values.[2] Ethics
Ethics
seeks to resolve questions of human morality by defining concepts such as good and evil, right and wrong, virtue and vice, justice and crime
[...More...]

"Ethics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Physics
Physics
Physics
(from Ancient Greek: φυσική (ἐπιστήμη), translit. physikḗ (epistḗmē), lit. 'knowledge of nature', from φύσις phýsis "nature"[1][2][3]) is the natural science that studies matter[4] and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force.[5] Physics
[...More...]

"Physics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Farnese Collection
The classical sculptures in the Farnese Collection, one aspect of this large art collection, are one of the first collections of artistic items from Greco-Roman Antiquity. It includes some of the most influential classical works, including the sculptures that were part of the Farnese Marbles, their collection of statuary. The works are now displayed in the Naples National Archaeological Museum
Naples National Archaeological Museum
in Naples and the British Museum
British Museum
in London.[1]Contents1 History 2 Display 3 Move to Naples 4 Famous items from the Farnese collection 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Apollo
Apollo
seated with lyre. Porphyry and marble, 2nd century AD. Farnese collection, Naples, Italy.The items in the collection were acquired or requisitioned by Cardinal Alessandro Farnese, who became Pope Paul III
Pope Paul III
(1543 - 1549)
[...More...]

"Farnese Collection" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Discourses Of Epictetus
The Discourses of Epictetus
Epictetus
(Greek: Ἐπικτήτου διατριβαί, Epiktētou diatribai) are a series of extracts of the teachings of the Stoic philosopher Epictetus
Epictetus
written down by Arrian
Arrian
c. 108 AD.Contents1 Content 2 Manuscript
Manuscript
editions 3 English translations 4 Notes 5 External linksContent[edit] There were originally eight books, but only four now remain in their entirety, along with a few fragments of the others. In a preface attached to the Discourses, Arrian
Arrian
explains how he came to write them:I neither wrote these Discourses of Epictetus
Epictetus
in the way in which a man might write such things; nor did I make them public myself, inasmuch as I declare that I did not even write them
[...More...]

"Discourses Of Epictetus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Stoa Poikile
The Stoa
Stoa
Poikile (Ancient Greek: ἡ ποικίλη στοά) or Painted Porch, originally called the Porch of Peisianax (Ancient Greek: ἡ Πεισιανάκτειος στοά), was erected during the 5th century BC and was located on the north side of the Ancient Agora of Athens. The Stoa
Stoa
Poikile was one of the most famous sites in ancient Athens, owing its fame to the paintings and loot from wars displayed in it. The Stoa
Stoa
was the location from which Zeno of Citium taught Stoicism. The philosophical school of Stoicism
Stoicism
takes its name from having first been expounded here, and was derived from the Greek word stoa
[...More...]

"Stoa Poikile" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
[...More...]

"Greek Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Renaissance Philosophy
The designation Renaissance
Renaissance
philosophy is used by scholars of intellectual history to refer to the thought of the period running in Europe roughly between 1355 and 1650 (the dates shift forward for central and northern Europe and for areas such as Spanish America, India, Japan, and China under European influence). It therefore overlaps both with late medieval philosophy, which in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries was influenced by notable figures such as Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, William of Ockham, and Marsilius of Padua, and early modern philosophy, which conventionally starts with René Descartes
René Descartes
and his publication of the Discourse on Method in 1637. Philosophers usually divide the period less finely, jumping from medieval to early modern philosophy, on the assumption that no radical shifts in perspective took place in the centuries immediately before Descartes
[...More...]

"Renaissance Philosophy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western)
[...More...]

"Roman Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Diadochi
The Diadochi
Diadochi
(/daɪˈædəkaɪ/; plural of Latin
Latin
Diadochus, from Greek: Διάδοχοι, Diádokhoi, "successors") were the rival generals, families, and friends of Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
who fought for control over his empire after his death in 323 BC
[...More...]

"Diadochi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Gilbert Murray
George Gilbert Aimé Murray, OM (2 January 1866 – 20 May 1957) was an Australian-born British[1] classical scholar and public intellectual, with connections in many spheres. He was an outstanding scholar of the language and culture of Ancient Greece, perhaps the leading authority in the first half of the twentieth century. He is the basis for the character of Adolphus Cusins in his friend George Bernard Shaw's play Major Barbara, and also appears as the chorus figure in Tony Harrison's play Fram.Contents1 Early life 2 Classicist2.1 Academic career 2.2 Greek drama 2.3 The Ritualists3 In public life3.1 Liberal Party politics 3.2 Activist 3.3 Involvement with Wells 3.4 Psychical research4 Humanism 5 Awards and honours 6 Family 7 Works7.1 Translation 7.2 Classical studies 7.3 Other8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 External linksEarly life[edit] Murray was born George Gilbert Aimé Murray in Sydney, Australia
[...More...]

"Gilbert Murray" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Colonnade
In classical architecture, a colonnade is a long sequence of columns joined by their entablature, often free-standing, or part of a building.[1] Paired or multiple pairs of columns are normally employed in a colonnade which can be straight or curved. The space enclosed may be covered or open. In St. Peter's Square
St. Peter's Square
in Rome, Bernini's great colonnade encloses a vast open elliptical space. When in front of a building, screening the door (Latin porta), it is called a portico, when enclosing an open court, a peristyle. A portico may be more than one rank of columns deep, as at the Pantheon in Rome or the stoae of Ancient Greece. Colonnades have been built since ancient times and interpretations of the classical model have continued through to modern times, and Neoclassical styles remained popular for centuries.[2] At the British Museum, for example, porticos are continued along the front as a colonnade
[...More...]

"Colonnade" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Athens
Athens
Athens
(/ˈæθɪnz/;[3] Greek: Αθήνα, Athína [aˈθina], Ancient Greek: Ἀθῆναι, Athênai [a.tʰɛ̂ː.nai̯]) is the capital and largest city of Greece
[...More...]

"Athens" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.