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Steven Schachter
Steven Schachter is an American television, theatre, and film director and screenwriter. Much of Schachter's success stems from projects on which he has collaborated with William H. Macy. The two co-wrote the cable television movies The Con (1998), A Slight Case of Murder (1999), Door to Door (2002), and The Wool Cap (2004), all of which Schachter directed and in which Macy starred. He also has directed numerous other made-for-TV movies, including an adaptation of David Mamet's play The Water Engine, which he had directed at the off-Broadway Public Theater in 1977 and again at the Plymouth Theatre
Plymouth Theatre
on Broadway the following year. In 2006 he directed the TV movie The Mermaid Chair. Schachter's latest projects also involve Macy. In May 2007, he completed filming the feature The Deal, written by and starring Macy, which is scheduled for release in 2008
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Lat
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Plymouth Theatre
The Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre is a Broadway theatre, previously known as the Plymouth Theatre, located at 236 West 45th Street (George Abbott Way) in midtown Manhattan
Manhattan
and renamed in 2005 in honor of Gerald Schoenfeld. Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp
Herbert J. Krapp
to resemble the neighboring Shubert and Booth theatres designed by Henry B. Herts, the building was constructed by the Shubert brothers in 1917-18, christened the Plymouth Theatre, and leased to producer Arthur Hopkins. He intended it to be a venue for legitimate plays starring notable actors such as John and Lionel Barrymore. The premiere production was A Successful Calamity, a comedy with William Gillette
William Gillette
and Estelle Winwood. After Hopkins died in 1948, control of the theatre returned to the Shuberts, who still own the property, which was designated a New York landmark in 1987
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Tom Gries
Thomas Stephen "Tom" Gries[1] (December 20, 1922 – January 3, 1977) was an American TV and film director, writer, and film producer.Contents1 Life and career 2 Filmography 3 References 4 External linksLife and career[edit] Gries was born in Chicago, Illinois. His mother Ruth later remarried to jazz musician Muggsy Spanier.[2] Educated at the Loyola Academy
Loyola Academy
and Georgetown University. Gries began working in TV in the 1950s as a writer and director. His work can be seen on such popular programs as Bronco, Wanted: Dead or Alive, The Westerner, The Rifleman, Checkmate, Cain's Hundred,, East Side/West Side, Route 66, Stoney Burke, Combat!, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Honey West, I Spy, Mission: Impossible, and Batman among many others
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Fielder Cook
Fielder Cook (March 9, 1923 – June 20, 2003) was an American television and film director, producer, and writer whose 1971 television movie The Homecoming: A Christmas Story spawned the series The Waltons.Contents1 Biography and career 2 Selected filmography 3 Awards and nominations 4 References 5 External linksBiography and career[edit] Born in Atlanta, Georgia, Cook graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Literature
Literature
from Washington and Lee University, then studied Elizabethan Drama at the University of Birmingham
University of Birmingham
in England. He returned to the United States
United States
and began his career in the early days of television, directing multiple episodes of such anthology series as Lux Video Theater, The Kaiser Aluminum Hour, Playhouse 90, Omnibus, and Kraft Television Theatre
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Primetime Emmy Award For Outstanding Directing For A Limited Series, Movie, Or Dramatic Special
All pages beginning with "Outstanding"."Outstanding"Single by The Gap Bandfrom the album Gap Band IVB-side "The Boys Are Back in Town"Released November 1982Recorded 1982Genre Funk[1]Length 3:19 (album version) 6:13 (extended version)Label Total ExperienceSongwriter(s) Raymond Calhoun The Gap Band
The Gap Band
singles chronology"You Dropped a Bomb on Me" (1982) "Outstanding" (1982) "Party Train" (1983)"You Dropped a Bomb on Me" (1982) "Outstanding" (1982) "Party Train" (1983)"Outstanding" is a song originally performed by The Gap Band
The Gap Band
and written by member Raymond Calhoun. The song originally appeared on the group's platinum-selling 1982 album Gap Band IV. It is one of their signature songs and biggest hits, reaching the number one spot on the U.S. R&B Singles Chart in February 1983
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Internet Broadway Database
The Internet Broadway Database
Database
(IBDB) is an online database of Broadway theatre
Broadway theatre
productions and their personnel. It was conceived and created by Karen Hauser in 1996 and is operated by the Research Department of The Broadway League, a trade association for the North American commercial theatre community.[2] The website also has a corresponding app for both the IOS and Android.[3][4][5] This comprehensive history of Broadway provides records of productions from the beginnings of New York theatre in the 18th century up to today. Details include cast and creative lists for opening night and current day, song lists, awards and other interesting facts about every Broadway production
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IMDb
IMDb, also known as Internet Movie Database, is an online database of information related to world films, television programs, home videos and video games, and internet streams, including cast, production crew, personnel and fictional character biographies, plot summaries, trivia, and fan reviews and ratings. An additional fan feature, message boards, was abandoned in February, 2017. The database is owned and operated by IMDb.com, Inc., a subsidiary of Amazon. As of December 2017[update], IMDb
IMDb
has approximately 4.7 million titles (including episodes) and 8.3 million personalities in its database,[2] as well as 83 million registered users. The movie and talent pages of IMDb
IMDb
are accessible to all internet users, but a registration process is necessary to contribute information to the site. Most data in the database is provided by volunteer contributors
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Writers Guild Of America
The Writers Guild of America is the joint efforts of two different US labor unions representing TV and film writers:The Writers Guild of America, East (WGAE), headquartered in New York City. The Writers Guild of America, West
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Humanitas Prize
The Humanitas Prize
Humanitas Prize
is an award for film and television writing intended to promote human dignity, meaning, and freedom. It began in 1974 with Father Ellwood "Bud" Kieser—also the founder of Paulist Productions—but is generally not seen as specifically directed toward religious cinema or TV. The prize is distinguished from similar honors for screenwriters in that a large cash award, between $10,000 and $25,000, accompanies each prize
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Television Director
A television director is in charge of the activities involved in making a television program, or section of a programme. They are generally responsible for decisions about the editorial content and creative style of a programme, and ensuring the producer's vision is delivered
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Edgar Allan Poe Award
The Edgar Allan Poe
Edgar Allan Poe
Awards (popularly called the Edgars), named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America,[1] based in New York City.[2] They honor the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction, television, film, and theater published or produced in the previous year.Contents1 Categories 2 Best Novel award winners2.1 1950s 2.2 1960s 2.3 1970s 2.4 1980s 2.5 1990s 2.6 2000s 2.7 2010s3 1972 winners 4 2010 winners 5 2012 winners 6 2013 winners 7 2014 winners 8 2015 winners 9 2016 winn
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Turner Network Television
TNT is an American basic cable and satellite television channel owned by the Turner Broadcasting System, a division of Time Warner
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Television Pilot
A television pilot (also known as a pilot or a pilot episode and sometimes marketed as a tele-movie) is a standalone episode of a television series that is used to sell the show to a television network. At the time of its creation, the pilot is meant to be the testing ground to gauge whether a series will be successful, and is therefore a test episode of an intended television series. It is an early step in the development of a television series, much like pilot studies serve as precursors to the start of larger activity. In the case of a successful television series, the pilot is commonly the very first episode that is aired of the particular series under its own name. A "back door pilot" is an episode of an existing successful series that features future tie-in characters of an up-and-coming television series or film
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Feature Film
A feature film is a film (also called a motion picture, movie, or just film) with a running time long enough to be considered the principal or sole film to fill a program. The notion of how long this should be has varied according to time and place. According to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the American Film
Film
Institute, and the British Film
Film
Institute, a feature film runs for at least 40 minutes, while the Screen Actors Guild
Screen Actors Guild
holds that it is 80 minutes or longer. Most feature films are between 70 and 210 minutes long. The first dramatic feature film was the 60-minute The Story of the Kelly Gang (1906, Australia)[1]. The first (proto)-feature-length adaptation was Les Misérables (1909, U.S.)
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Broadway Theatre
Broadway theatre,[nb 1] commonly known as Broadway, refers to the theatrical performances presented in the 41 professional theatres with 500 or more seats located in the Theater District and Lincoln Center along Broadway, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.[1] Along with London's West End theatre, Broadway theatre
Broadway theatre
is widely considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre in the English-speaking world. The Theater District is a popular tourist attraction in New York City. According to The Broadway League, for the 2016–2017 season (which ended May 21, 2017), total attendance was 13,270,343 and Broadway shows had US$1,449,399,149 in grosses, with attendance down 0.4%, grosses up 5.5%, and playing weeks down 4.1%.[2] The great majority of Broadway shows are musicals
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