HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Sterling Publishing
Sterling Publishing Company, Inc. is a publisher of a broad range of subject areas, with multiple imprints and more than 5,000 titles in print. Founded in 1949,[1] Sterling also publishes books for a number of brands, including AARP, Hasbro, Hearst Magazines, and USA TODAY, as well as serves as the North American distributor for domestic and international publishers including: Anova, Boxer Books, the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Carlton Books, Duncan Baird, Guild of Master Craftsmen, the Orion Publishing Group, and Sixth & Spring Books.[2] Sterling also owns and operates two verticals[clarification needed], Lark Crafts
Crafts
and Pixiq. Sterling Publishing is a wholly owned subsidiary of Barnes & Noble, who acquired it in 2003
[...More...]

"Sterling Publishing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Parent Company
A parent company is a company that owns enough voting stock in another firm to control management and operation by doing and influencing or electing its board of directors
[...More...]

"Parent Company" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sudoku
Sudoku
Sudoku
(数独, sūdoku, digit-single) (/suːˈdoʊkuː/, /-ˈdɒk-/, /sə-/, originally called Number Place)[1] is a logic-based,[2][3] combinatorial[4] number-placement puzzle. The objective is to fill a 9×9 grid with digits so that each column, each row, and each of the nine 3×3 subgrids that compose the grid (also called "boxes", "blocks", or "regions") contains all of the digits from 1 to 9. The puzzle setter provides a partially completed grid, which for a well-posed puzzle has a single solution. Completed games are always a type of Latin square
Latin square
with an additional constraint on the contents of individual regions
[...More...]

"Sudoku" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

House Beautiful
House Beautiful is an interior decorating magazine that focuses on decorating and the domestic arts. First published in 1896,[2] it is currently published by the Hearst Corporation, who began publishing it in 1934. It is the oldest still-published magazine in what is known as the "shelter magazine" genre.[3] The magazine was launched in the UK in the early 1950s, positioned for young 'home-makers'; and it is still sold in the UK where it has a circulation of 118,290[4] Editors[edit]Eugene Klapp and Henry B. Harvey (1896-1897) Eugene Klapp (1897-1898) Herbert S. Stone (1898-1913) Virginia Robie (1913-1915) Mabel Kent (1915-1916) Grace Atkinson Kimball (1916-1918) Mabel Rollins (1918-1920) Charlotte Lewis (1921) Ellery Sedgwick (1922) Ethel B. Power (1923-1934) Arthur H. Samuels (1934-1936) Kenneth K
[...More...]

"House Beautiful" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Marie Claire
Marie Claire
Marie Claire
is an international monthly magazine first published in France
France
in 1937, followed by the UK in 1941. Since then various editions are published in many countries and languages. The feature editions focuses on women around the world and several global issues. Marie Claire
Marie Claire
magazine also covers health, beauty, and fashion topics.Contents1 History 2 Worldwide 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Marie Claire
Marie Claire
was founded by Jean Prouvost[4] and Marcelle Auclair.[5] Its first issue appeared in 1937,[6] and it was distributed each Wednesday until 1941 when it handed out its shares to open in London, going international for the first time.[7] In 1976, Prouvost retired and his daughter Évelyne took over the magazine and added L'Oréal Group to the company.[8] Worldwide[edit] The U.S
[...More...]

"Marie Claire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Popular Mechanics
Popular Mechanics
Popular Mechanics
is a classic magazine of popular science and technology. Popular Mechanics
Popular Mechanics
was first published by Henry Haven Windsor, January 11, 1902. It has been owned since 1958 by Hearst Communications. There are nine[3] international editions, including a now-defunct Latin American version that had been published for decades, and a newer South African edition. The Russian edition of Popular Mechanics has been issued since 2002
[...More...]

"Popular Mechanics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Redbook
Redbook
Redbook
is an American women's magazine published by the Hearst Corporation.[2] It is one of the "Seven Sisters", a group of women's service magazines.Contents1 History 2 Coverage 3 Condensed novels 4 Writers 5 Bibliography 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Redbook
Redbook
in 1913The magazine was first published in May 1903[2][3] as The Red Book Illustrated by Stumer, Rosenthal and Eckstein, a firm of Chicago retail merchants. The name was changed to The Red Book Magazine shortly thereafter.[4] Its first editor, from 1903 to 1906, was Trumbull White, who wrote that the name was appropriate because, "Red is the color of cheerfulness, of brightness, of gaiety." In its early years, the magazine published short fiction by well-known authors, including many women writers, along with photographs of popular actresses and other women of note
[...More...]

"Redbook" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Seventeen (American Magazine)
Seventeen is an American teen magazine. The magazine's reader-base is 13-to-19-year-old females.[2] It began as a publication geared toward inspiring teen girls to become model workers and citizens.[3] Soon after its debut, Seventeen took a more fashion- and romance-oriented approach in presenting its material while promoting self-confidence in young women. It was first published in September 1944[4] by Walter Annenberg's Triangle Publications.Contents1 Seventeen's early history 2 International editions 3 Seventeen in other media3.1 America's Next Top Model 3.2 Cyberbu//y 3.3 Controversy4 Editors 5 Changes in United States
United States
cover price 6 References 7 External linksSeventeen's early history[edit] The first editor of Seventeen, Helen Valentine, provided teenage girls with working woman role models and information about their development. Seventeen enhanced the role of teenagers as consumers of popular culture
[...More...]

"Seventeen (American Magazine)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Town & Country (magazine)
Town & Country, formerly the Home Journal and The National Press, is a monthly American lifestyle magazine. It is the oldest continually published general interest magazine in the United States.Contents1 History1.1 Early history 1.2 Modern history 1.3 Spin-off2 References 3 External linksHistory[edit] Early history[edit] It was founded by poet and essayist Nathaniel Parker Willis
Nathaniel Parker Willis
and New York Evening Mirror newspaper editor George Pope Morris, as The National Press in 1846.[2] Eight months later, it was renamed The Home Journal.[3] After 1901, the magazine title became "Town & Country" and it has retained that name ever since. Throughout most of the 19th century, this weekly magazine featured poetry, essays, and fiction. As more influential people began reading it, the magazine began to include society news and gossip in its pages
[...More...]

"Town & Country (magazine)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Crafts
A craft or trade is a pastime or a profession that requires particular skills and knowledge of skilled work. In a historical sense, particularly the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and earlier, the term is usually applied to people occupied in small-scale production of goods, or their maintenance, for example by tinkers. The traditional terms craftsman and craftswoman are nowadays often replaced by artisan and rarely by craftsperson (craftspeople). Historically, the more specialized crafts with high value products tended to concentrate in urban centers and formed guilds. The skill required by their professions and the need to be permanently involved in the exchange of goods often demanded a generally higher level of education, and craftsmen were usually in a more privileged position than the peasantry in societal hierarchy
[...More...]

"Crafts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cuisine
A cuisine is a style of cooking characterized by distinctive ingredients, techniques and dishes, and usually associated with a specific culture or geographic region. A cuisine is primarily influenced by the ingredients that are available locally or through trade. Religious food laws, such as Hindu, Islamic and Jewish dietary laws, can also exercise a strong influence on cuisine
[...More...]

"Cuisine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Asheville, North Carolina
Asheville is a city and the county seat of Buncombe County, North Carolina, United States.[6] It is the largest city in Western North Carolina, and the 12th-most populous city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of North Carolina. The city's population was 89,121 according to the 2016 estimates.[7] It is the principal city in the four-county Asheville metropolitan area, with a population of 424,858 in 2010.[8] Asheville is home to the National Centers For Environmental Information (NCEI), the world's largest active archive of environmental data. Many tourists come to Asheville for its breweries and restaurants
[...More...]

"Asheville, North Carolina" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Crosswords
A crossword is a word puzzle that usually takes the form of a square or a rectangular grid of white-and black-shaded squares. The game's goal is to fill the white squares with letters, forming words or phrases, by solving clues, which lead to the answers. In languages that are written left-to-right, the answer words and phrases are placed in the grid from left to right and from top to bottom
[...More...]

"Crosswords" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Good Housekeeping
Good Housekeeping
Good Housekeeping
is a women's magazine owned by the Hearst Corporation, featuring articles about women's interests, product testing by The Good Housekeeping
Good Housekeeping
Institute, recipes, diet, and health, as well as literary articles. It is well known for the "Good Housekeeping Seal", popularly known as the " Good Housekeeping
Good Housekeeping
Seal of Approval".[citation needed]Contents1 History and profile 2 Good Housekeeping
Good Housekeeping
Research Institute 3 International editions 4 American editors 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory and profile[edit] On May 2, 1885 (132 years ago) (1885-05-02), Clark W
[...More...]

"Good Housekeeping" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chess
Chess
Chess
is a two-player strategy board game played on a chessboard, a checkered gameboard with 64 squares arranged in an 8×8 grid.[1] The game is played by millions of people worldwide. Each player begins with 16 pieces: one king, one queen, two rooks, two knights, two bishops, and eight pawns. Each of the six piece types moves differently, with the most powerful being the queen and the least powerful the pawn. The objective is to checkmate[note 1] the opponent's king by placing it under an inescapable threat of capture. To this end, a player's pieces are used to attack and capture the opponent's pieces, while supporting each other. In addition to checkmate, the game can be won by voluntary resignation of the opponent, which typically occurs when too much material is lost or checkmate appears inevitable
[...More...]

"Chess" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kakuro
Kakuro
Kakuro
or Kakkuro (Japanese: カックロ) is a kind of logic puzzle that is often referred to as a mathematical transliteration of the crossword. Kakuro
Kakuro
puzzles are regular features in many math-and-logic puzzle publications across the world. In 1966,[1] Canadian Jacob E. Funk, an employee of Dell Magazines, came up with the original English name Cross Sums [2] and other names such as Cross Addition have also been used, but the Japanese name Kakuro, abbreviation of Japanese kasan kurosu (加算クロス, addition cross), seems to have gained general acceptance and the puzzles appear to be titled this way now in most publications
[...More...]

"Kakuro" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.