HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Stereoisomer
In stereochemistry, stereoisomers are isomeric molecules that have the same molecular formula and sequence of bonded atoms (constitution), but differ in the three-dimensional orientations of their atoms in space.[1][2] This contrasts with structural isomers, which share the same molecular formula, but the bond connections or their order differs. By definition, molecules that are stereoisomers of each other represent the same structural isomer.Contents1 Enantiomers 2 Diastereomers2.1 Cis–trans and E-Z isomerism3 Conformers 4 Anomers 5 Atropisomers 6 More definitions 7 Le Bel-van't Hoff rule 8 ReferencesEnantiomers[edit] Main articles: Chirality (chemistry)
Chirality (chemistry)
and Enantiomer Enantiomers, also known as optical isomers, are two stereoisomers that are related to each other by a reflection: they are mirror images of each other that are non-superimposable. Human hands are a macroscopic analog of this
[...More...]

"Stereoisomer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Absolute Configuration
An absolute configuration refers to the spatial arrangement of the atoms of a chiral molecular entity (or group) and its stereochemical description e.g. R or S,[1] referring to Rectus, or Sinister, respectively. Absolute configurations for a chiral molecule (in pure form) are most often obtained by X-ray crystallography. All enantiomerically pure chiral molecules crystallise in one of the 65 Sohncke groups (chiral space groups). Alternative techniques are optical rotatory dispersion, vibrational circular dichroism, use of chiral shift reagents in proton NMR and Coulomb explosion imaging.[2][3] When the absolute configuration is obtained the assignment of R or S is based on the Cahn–Ingold–Prelog priority rules. Absolute configurations are also relevant to characterization of crystals. Until 1951 it was not possible to obtain the absolute configuration of chiral compounds.[4] It was at some time decided that (+)-glyceraldehyde was the (R)-enantiomer
[...More...]

"Absolute Configuration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Glycine
Foloogical sci For other uses, see Glycine
Glycine
(other). "Gly" redirects here
[...More...]

"Glycine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Steric Strain
In chemistry, van der Waals strain is strain resulting from van der Waals repulsion when two substituents in a molecule approach each other with a distance less than the sum of their van der Waals radii. Van der Waals strain is also called van der Waals repulsion and is related to steric hindrance.[1] One of the most common forms of this strain is eclipsing hydrogen, in Alkanes. In rotational and pseudorotational mechanisms[edit] In molecules whose vibrational mode involves a rotational or pseudorotational mechanism (such as the Berry mechanism
[...More...]

"Steric Strain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Covalent Bond
A covalent bond, also called a molecular bond, is a chemical bond that involves the sharing of electron pairs between atoms
[...More...]

"Covalent Bond" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Transition State
The transition state of a chemical reaction is a particular configuration along the reaction coordinate. It is defined as the state corresponding to the highest potential energy along this reaction coordinate. At this point, assuming a perfectly irreversible reaction, colliding reactant molecules always go on to form products.[1] It is often marked with the double dagger ‡ symbol. As an example, the transition state shown below occurs during the SN2 reaction of bromoethane with a hydroxyl anion:The DFT-determined geometry for the transition state of the above reaction.[2] Distances are listed in angstroms
[...More...]

"Transition State" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cyclohexane Conformation
A cyclohexane conformation is any of several three-dimensional shapes that a cyclohexane molecule can assume while maintaining the integrity of its chemical bonds. The internal angles of a flat regular hexagon are 120°, while the preferred angle between successive bonds in a carbon chain is about 109.5°, the tetrahedral angle. Therefore, the cyclohexane ring tends to assume certain non-planar (warped) conformations, which have all angles closer to 109.5° and therefore a lower strain energy than the flat hexagonal shape
[...More...]

"Cyclohexane Conformation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Atomic Number
The atomic number or proton number (symbol Z) of a chemical element is the number of protons found in the nucleus of an atom. It is identical to the charge number of the nucleus. The atomic number uniquely identifies a chemical element. In an uncharged atom, the atomic number is also equal to the number of electrons. The sum of the atomic number Z and the number of neutrons, N, gives the mass number A of an atom. Since protons and neutrons have approximately the same mass (and the mass of the electrons is negligible for many purposes) and the mass defect of nucleon binding is always small compared to the nucleon mass, the atomic mass of any atom, when expressed in unified atomic mass units (making a quantity called the "relative isotopic mass"), is within 1% of the whole number A. Atoms with the same atomic number Z but different neutron numbers N, and hence different atomic masses, are known as isotopes
[...More...]

"Atomic Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

E-Z Notation
E-Z configuration, or the E-Z convention, is the IUPAC
IUPAC
preferred method of describing the absolute stereochemistry of double bonds in organic chemistry
[...More...]

"E-Z Notation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Compendium Of Chemical Terminology
The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry
International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry
publishes many books, which contain its complete list of definitions. The definitions are divided into seven "colour books": Gold, Green, Blue, Purple, Orange, White, and Red.[1] There is also an eighth book—the "Silver Book".Contents1 The eight colour books1.1 Blue Book 1.2 Gold Book 1.3 Green Book 1.4 Orange Book 1.5 Purple Book 1.6 Red Book 1.7 Silver Book 1.8 White Book2 See also 3 References 4 External links4.1 Blue Book 4.2 Gold Book 4.3 Orange Book 4.4 Red Book 4.5 OthersThe eight colour books[edit] Blue Book[edit] Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry, commonly referred to by chemists as the Blue Book, is a collection of recommendations on organic chemical nomenclature published at irregular intervals by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC)
[...More...]

"Compendium Of Chemical Terminology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Union Of Pure And Applied Chemistry
The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry
Chemistry
(IUPAC) /ˈaɪjuːpæk/ or /ˈjuːpæk/ is an international federation of National Adhering Organizations that represents chemists in individual countries. It is a member of the International Council for Science (ICSU).[2] IUPAC is registered in Zürich, Switzerland, and the administrative office, known as the "IUPAC Secretariat", is in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, United States. This administrative office is headed by IUPAC's executive director,[3] currently Lynn Soby.[4] IUPAC was established in 1919 as the successor of the International Congress of Applied Chemistry
Chemistry
for the advancement of chemistry. Its members, the National Adhering Organizations, can be national chemistry societies, national academies of sciences, or other bodies representing chemists
[...More...]

"International Union Of Pure And Applied Chemistry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mirror Image
A mirror image (in a plane mirror) is a reflected duplication of an object that appears almost identical, but is reversed in the direction perpendicular to the mirror surface. As an optical effect it results from reflection off of substances such as a mirror or water
[...More...]

"Mirror Image" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chiral Derivatizing Agent
A chiral derivatizing agent (CDA) also known as a chiral resolving reagent, is a chiral auxiliary used to convert a mixture of enantiomers into diastereomers in order to analyze the quantities of each enantiomer present within the mix. Analysis can be conducted by spectroscopy or by chromatography. The use of chiral derivatizing agents has declined with the popularization of chiral HPLC. Besides analysis, chiral derivatization is also used for chiral resolution, the actual physical separation of the enantiomers
[...More...]

"Chiral Derivatizing Agent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Polarized Light
Polarization (also polarisation) is a property applying to transverse waves that specifies the geometrical orientation of the oscillations.[1][2][3][4][5] In a transverse wave, the direction of the oscillation is transverse to the direction of motion of the wave, so the oscillations can have different directions perpendicular to the wave direction.[4] A simple example of a polarized transverse wave is vibrations traveling along a taut string (see image); for example, in a musical instrument like a guitar string. Depending on how the string is plucked, the vibrations can be in a vertical direction, horizontal direction, or at any angle perpendicular to the string
[...More...]

"Polarized Light" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.