HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Stephanus Of Byzantium
Stephen of Byzantium, also known as Stephanus Byzantinus (Greek: Στέφανος Βυζάντιος; fl. 6th century AD), was the author of an important geographical dictionary entitled Ethnica (Ἐθνικά). Of the dictionary itself only meagre fragments survive, but we possess an epitome compiled by one Hermolaus, not otherwise identified.Contents1 Life 2 The Ethnica 3 Editions 4 References 5 Sources 6 Further readingLife[edit] Byzantium
Byzantium
during Stephanus lifetimeNothing is known about the life of Stephanus, except that he was a grammarian at Constantinople, and lived after the time of Arcadius
Arcadius
and Honorius, and before that of Justinian II
[...More...]

"Stephanus Of Byzantium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
[...More...]

"Greek Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

William Smith (lexicographer)
Sir William Smith (20 May 1813 – 7 October 1893)[1] was an English lexicographer. He also made advances in the teaching of Greek and Latin in schools.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Publications3 Honours and death 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Smith was born in Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist
Nonconformist
parents. He attended the Madras House school of John Allen in Hackney.[2] Originally destined for a theological career, he instead was articled to a solicitor. In his spare time he taught himself classics, and when he entered University College London
University College London
he carried off both the Greek and Latin prizes
[...More...]

"William Smith (lexicographer)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Augustus Meineke
Johann Albrecht Friedrich August Meineke
August Meineke
(also Augustus Meineke; German: [ˈmaɪnəkə]; 8 December 1790 – 12 December 1870), German classical scholar, was born at Soest in the Duchy of Westphalia. He was father-in-law to philologist Theodor Bergk.[1] He obtained his education at the University of Leipzig
University of Leipzig
as a student of Johann Gottfried Jakob Hermann. After holding an educational post at Danzig (now Gdańsk, Poland), he was director of the Joachimsthal Gymnasium in Berlin
Berlin
from 1826 to 1856.[2] In 1830 he became a member of the Berlin
Berlin
Academy
[...More...]

"Augustus Meineke" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aldus Manutius
Aldus
Aldus
Pius Manutius also known as Aldo Manuzio (Italian: Aldo Pio Manuzio; ca. 1452 – February 6, 1515) was a Venetian humanist, scholar, and educator. He became a printer and publisher in his forties when he helped found the Aldine Press
Aldine Press
in Venice. Manutius is known for publishing rare manuscripts in their original Greek and Latin
Latin
form. Before Manutius, publishers rarely printed volumes in Greek. Manutius commissioned type cutters to create fonts in Greek and Latin
Latin
resembling humanist handwriting of his time. Manutius' fonts would be the first known instance of italic type
[...More...]

"Aldus Manutius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Claudius Salmasius
Claudius Salmasius
Claudius Salmasius
is the Latin
Latin
name of Claude Saumaise (15 April 1588 – 3 September 1653), a French classical scholar.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Legacy 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit]Claudius SalmasiusSalmasius was born at Semur-en-Auxois
Semur-en-Auxois
in Burgundy. His father, a counsellor of the parlement of Dijon, sent him, at the age of sixteen, to Paris, where he became intimate with Isaac Casaubon
Isaac Casaubon
(1559–1614). In 1606 he went to the University of Heidelberg, where he studied under the jurist Denis Godefroy,[1] and devoted himself to the classics, influenced by the librarian Jan Gruter.[2] Here he embraced Protestantism, the religion of his mother. Returning to Burgundy, Salmasius qualified for the succession to his father's post, which he eventually lost on account of his religion
[...More...]

"Claudius Salmasius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lucas Holstenius
Lucas Holstenius, born Lukas Holste (1596 – February 2, 1661), was a German Catholic
Catholic
humanist, geographer and historian. Life[edit] Born at Hamburg
Hamburg
in 1596, he studied at the gymnasium of Hamburg, and later at Leyden University, where he was closely acquainted with some of the most famous scholars of the age, including Johannes Meursius, Daniel Heinsius
Daniel Heinsius
and Philip Cluverius, whom in 1618 he accompanied on his travels in Italy and Sicily, thus giving him a taste for the study of geography
[...More...]

"Lucas Holstenius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Karl Wilhelm Dindorf
Karl Wilhelm Dindorf (Latin: Guilielmus Dindorfius; 2 January 1802 – 1 August 1883) was a German classical scholar. He was born and died at Leipzig. From his earliest years he showed a strong taste for classical studies, and after completing F Invernizi's edition of Aristophanes
Aristophanes
at an early age, and editing several grammarians[1] and rhetoricians,[2] was in 1828 appointed extraordinary professor of literary history in his native city. Disappointed at not obtaining the ordinary professorship when it became vacant in 1833, he resigned his post in the same year, and devoted himself entirely to study and literary work. His attention had at first been chiefly given to Athenaeus, whom he edited in 1827, and to the Greek dramatists, all of whom he edited separately and combined in his Poetae scenici Graeci (1830 and later editions)
[...More...]

"Karl Wilhelm Dindorf" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5] Other works are actively dedicated
[...More...]

"Public Domain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
[...More...]

"Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dictionary Of Greek And Roman Biography And Mythology
The Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology
Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology
(1849, originally published 1844 under a slightly different title) is an encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. Edited by William Smith, the dictionary spans three volumes and 3,700 pages. It is a classic work of 19th-century lexicography. The work is a companion to Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities and Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography.[1]Contents1 Authors and scope 2 Use and availability today 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksAuthors and scope[edit]Excerpt from Philolaus
Philolaus
Pythagoras book, (Charles Peter Mason, 1870)The work lists thirty-five authors in addition to the editor, who is also an author for some definitions and articles
[...More...]

"Dictionary Of Greek And Roman Biography And Mythology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pierre Séguier
Pierre Séguier
Pierre Séguier
(French: [pjɛʁ seɡje]; 28 May 1588 – 28 January 1672) was a French statesman, chancellor of France from 1635.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early years 1.2 Career2 Culture 3 ReferencesBiography[edit] Early years[edit] Séguier was born in Paris
Paris
to a prominent legal family originating in Quercy. His grandfather, Pierre Séguier
Pierre Séguier
(1504–1580), was président à mortier in the parlement of Paris
Paris
from 1554 to 1576, and the chancellor's father, Jean Séguier, a seigneur d'Autry, was civil lieutenant of Paris
Paris
at the time of his death in 1596. Pierre was brought up by his uncle, Antoine Séguier, president and mortier in the parlement, and became master of requests in 1620. From 1621 to 1624 he was intendant of Guyenne, where he became closely allied with the duc d'Épernon
[...More...]

"Pierre Séguier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Edward Herbert Bunbury
Sir Edward Herbert Bunbury, 9th Baronet (8 July 1811 – 5 March 1895), known as Edward Bunbury until 1886, was an English Barrister and a British Liberal Party politician.Contents1 Biography 2 Work 3 Notes 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksBiography[edit] Bunbury was the second son of Sir Henry Bunbury, 7th Baronet, and the grandson of Henry Bunbury. His mother was Louisa Emilia, daughter of General the Hon. Henry Edward Fox, younger son of Henry Fox, 1st Baron Holland, and his wife Lady Caroline Lennox, the eldest of the famous Lennox sisters. Through the latter he was a descendant of Charles II. He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge.[1] He was called to the bar by the Inner Temple
Inner Temple
in 1841. In 1847 Bunbury was elected to the House of Commons for Bury St Edmunds, a seat he held until 1852
[...More...]

"Edward Herbert Bunbury" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
[...More...]

"Library Of Congress Control Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
[...More...]

"International Standard Name Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

LIBRIS
LIBRIS (Library Information System) is a Swedish national union catalogue maintained by the National Library of Sweden
Sweden
in Stockholm.[1] It is possible to freely search about 6.5 million titles nationwide.[2] In addition to bibliographic records, one for each book or publication, LIBRIS also contains an authority file of people
[...More...]

"LIBRIS" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.