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Stencil
Stencilling produces an image or pattern by applying pigment to a surface over an intermediate object with designed gaps in it which create the pattern or image by only allowing the pigment to reach some parts of the surface. The stencil is both the resulting image or pattern and the intermediate object; the context in which stencil is used makes clear which meaning is intended. In practice, the (object) stencil is usually a thin sheet of material, such as paper, plastic, wood or metal, with letters or a design cut from it, used to produce the letters or design on an underlying surface by applying pigment through the cut-out holes in the material. The key advantage of a stencil is that it can be reused to repeatedly and rapidly produce the same letters or design. Although aerosol or painting stencils can be made for one-time use, typically they are made with the intention of being reused
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Art Deco
Art Deco, sometimes referred to as Deco, is a style of visual arts, architecture and design that first appeared in France just before World War I.[1] Art Deco
Art Deco
influenced the design of buildings, furniture, jewelry, fashion, cars, movie theatres, trains, ocean liners, and everyday objects such as radios and vacuum cleaners.[2] It took its name, short for Arts Décoratifs, from the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes (International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts) held in Paris
Paris
in 1925.[3] It combined modernist styles with fine craftsmanship and rich materials. During its heyday, Art Deco represented luxury, glamour, exuberance, and faith in social and technological progress. Art Deco
Art Deco
was a pastiche of many different styles, sometimes contradictory, united by a desire to be modern
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Anarcho-punk
Anarcho-punk
Anarcho-punk
(or anarchist punk)[1] is punk rock that promotes anarchism. The term "anarcho-punk" is sometimes applied exclusively to bands that were part of the original anarcho-punk movement in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in the late 1970s and early 1980s
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DualShock
The DualShock
DualShock
(originally Dual Shock; trademarked as DUALSHOCK or DUAL SHOCK) is a line of gamepads with vibration-feedback developed by Sony Interactive Entertainment for PlayStation
PlayStation
consoles and devices.[1] The DualShock
DualShock
was introduced in Japan
Japan
in late 1997 and launched in the North American market in May 1998. First introduced as a secondary peripheral for the original PlayStation, an updated version of the PlayStation
PlayStation
console included the controller. Sony
Sony
subsequently phased out the digital controller that was originally included with the console, as well as the Sony
Sony
Dual Analog Controller
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Textile
A textile[1] is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres (yarn or thread). Yarn
Yarn
is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool, flax, cotton, hemp, or other materials to produce long strands.[2] Textiles are formed by weaving, knitting, crocheting, knotting, or felting. The related words fabric[3] and cloth[4] are often used in textile assembly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking) as synonyms for textile. However, there are subtle differences in these terms in specialized usage. A textile is any material made of interlacing fibres, including carpeting and geotextiles. A fabric is a material made through weaving, knitting, spreading, crocheting, or bonding that may be used in production of further goods (garments, etc.)
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Art Nouveau
Art Nouveau
Art Nouveau
(/ˌɑːrt nuːˈvoʊ, ˌɑːr/; French: [aʁ nuvo]) is an international style of art, architecture and applied art, especially the decorative arts, that was most popular between 1890 and 1910.[1] A reaction to the academic art of the 19th century, it was inspired by natural forms and structures, particularly the curved lines of plants and flowers. English uses the French name Art Nouveau
Art Nouveau
(new art)
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Collotype
Collotype is a dichromate-based photographic process invented by Alphonse Poitevin in 1856,[1][2] and used for large-volume mechanical printing before the introduction of cheaper offset lithography. It can produce results difficult to distinguish from metal-based photographic prints because of its microscopically fine reticulations which compose the image. Many old postcards are collotypes. Its possibilities for fine art photography were first employed in the United States by Alfred Stieglitz. The collotype plate is made by coating a plate of glass or metal with a substrate composed of gelatin or other colloid and hardening it. Then it is coated with a thick coat of dichromated gelatin and dried carefully at a controlled temperature (a little over 50 degrees Celsius) so it 'reticulates' or breaks up into a finely grained pattern when washed later in approximately 16 °C water
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The Allman Brothers Museum
Coordinates: 32°50′45.63″N 83°39′21.15″W / 32.8460083°N 83.6558750°W / 32.8460083; -83.6558750The Big House, 2009 The Allman Brothers Band
The Allman Brothers Band
Museum, also known as The Big House, is a museum in Macon, Georgia, United States. It was the home to The Allman Brothers Band's original members, their families, and various friends from 1970 to 1973. The Big House was renovated by The Big House Foundation and opened in November 2009 as an interactive museum dedicated to identifying and preserving the history of The Allman Brothers Band. [1] History[edit]Duane Allman's bedroom in 2010, decorated similarly to the way it was in 1970 (by Linda Oakley, then and now)In 1970 The Big House was rented from Day Realty for $225 a month by Linda Oakley, Berry Oakley's wife. The house is near Capricorn Records, which was The Allman Brothers recording studio
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André Edouard Marty
André Édouard Marty or A. É. Marty (April 16, 1882 – August 1974) was a Parisian artist who worked mainly in the classic Art Deco
Art Deco
style.Contents1 Career 2 Illustrated books 3 Related artists 4 References 5 External links5.1 Biographies 5.2 Examples of Marty illustrationsCareer[edit] Marty studied at the École des Beaux-Arts
École des Beaux-Arts
and Atelier Fernand Cormon in Montmartre, Paris
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Woodcut
Woodcut
Woodcut
is a relief printing technique in printmaking. An artist carves an image into the surface of a block of wood—typically with gouges—leaving the printing parts level with the surface while removing the non-printing parts. Areas that the artist cuts away carry no ink, while characters or images at surface level carry the ink to produce the print. The block is cut along the wood grain (unlike wood engraving, where the block is cut in the end-grain). The surface is covered with ink by rolling over the surface with an ink-covered roller (brayer), leaving ink upon the flat surface but not in the non-printing areas. Multiple colors can be printed by keying the paper to a frame around the woodblocks (using a different block for each color)
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Old Master Print
An old master print is a work of art produced by a printing process within the Western tradition. The term remains current in the art trade, and there is no easy alternative in English to distinguish the works of "fine art" produced in printmaking from the vast range of decorative, utilitarian and popular prints that grew rapidly alongside the artistic print from the 15th century onwards. Fifteenth-century prints are sufficiently rare that they are classed as old master prints even if they are of crude or merely workmanlike artistic quality. A date of about 1830 is usually taken as marking the end of the period whose prints are covered by this term. The main techniques used, in order of their introduction, are woodcut, engraving, etching, mezzotint and aquatint, although there are others. Different techniques are often combined in a single print. With rare exceptions printed on textiles, such as silk, or on vellum, old master prints are printed on paper
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Edo Period
The Edo
Edo
period (江戸時代, Edo
Edo
jidai) or Tokugawa period (徳川時代) is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyō. The period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, "no more wars", and popular enjoyment of arts and culture. The shogunate was officially established in Edo
Edo
on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu
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Nanotechnology
Nanotechnology
Nanotechnology
("nanotech") is manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology[1][2] referred to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macroscale products, also now referred to as molecular nanotechnology. A more generalized description of nanotechnology was subsequently established by the National Nanotechnology
Nanotechnology
Initiative, which defines nanotechnology as the manipulation of matter with at least one dimension sized from 1 to 100 nanometers
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Singapore
Singapore (/ˈsɪŋ(ɡ)əpɔːr/ ( listen)), officially the Republic of Singapore, is a sovereign city-state and island country in Southeast Asia. It lies one degree (137 kilometres or 85 miles) north of the equator, at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, with Indonesia's Riau Islands to the south and Peninsular Malaysia to the north. Singapore's territory consists of one main island along with 62 other islets. Since independence, extensive land reclamation has increased its total size by 23% (130 square kilometres or 50 square miles). Stamford Raffles founded colonial Singapore in 1819 as a trading post of the British East India Company; after the latter's collapse in 1858, the islands were ceded to the British Raj as a crown colony. During the Second World War, Singapore was occupied by Japan
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Berlin Wall
The Berlin
Berlin
Wall (German: Berliner Mauer, pronounced [bɛʁˈliːnɐ ˈmaʊ̯ɐ] ( listen)) was a guarded concrete barrier that physically and ideologically divided Berlin
Berlin
from 1961 to 1989.[1] Constructed by the German Democratic Republic (GDR, East Germany), starting on 13 August 1961, the Wall cut off (by land) West Berlin from virtually all of surrounding East Germany
East Germany
and East Berlin
East Berlin
until government officials opened it in November 1989.[2] Its demolition officially began on 13 June 1990 and finished in 1992.[3] The barrier included guard towers placed along large concrete walls,[4] accompanied by a wide area (later known as the "death strip") that contained anti-vehicle trenches, "fakir beds" and other defenses
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Anti-war
An anti-war movement (also antiwar) is a social movement, usually in opposition to a particular nation's decision to start or carry on an armed conflict, unconditional of a maybe-existing just cause. The term can also refer to pacifism, which is the opposition to all use of military force during conflicts. Many activists distinguish between anti-war movements and peace movements
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