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Sten
Mk. I, II, IIS, III, IV, V, VI Unit Cost $10 or £2.3 in 1942SpecificationsWeight 3.2 kg (7.1 lb) (Mk. II)Length 760 mm (30 in)Barrel length 196 mm (7.7 in)Cartridge 9×19mm
9×19mm
ParabellumAction Blowback-operated, Open boltRate of fire version dependent; ~500-600 round/minMuzzle velocity365 m/s (1,198 ft/s) 305 m/s (1,001 ft/s) (suppressed models)Effective firing range 100 mFeed system 32-round detachable box magazineSights fixed peep rear, post frontThe STEN (or Sten
Sten
gun) was a family of British submachine guns chambered in 9×19mm
9×19mm
and used extensively by British and Commonwealth forces throughout World War II
World War II
and the Korean War
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Woolwich
Woolwich
Woolwich
(/ˈwʊlɪtʃ, -ɪdʒ/) is a district of south-east London, England, within the Royal Borough of Greenwich. Originally a town in Kent, it has been part of the London
London
metropolitan area since the 19th century.[1] In 1965, most of the former Metropolitan Borough of Woolwich
Woolwich
became part of Greenwich
Greenwich
Borough, of which it remains the administrative centre. The town is a river crossing point, with the Woolwich Ferry
Woolwich Ferry
and the Woolwich foot tunnel
Woolwich foot tunnel
crossing to North Woolwich
North Woolwich
in the London Docklands. Throughout the 17th, 18th, 19th and most of the 20th century, Woolwich
Woolwich
was an important naval, military and industrial town
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Turkish Invasion Of Cyprus
Turkish victory[2]Fall of the junta in Cyprus
Cyprus
and Greek military junta
Greek military junta
in
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Muzzle Velocity
Muzzle velocity
Muzzle velocity
is the speed of a projectile at the moment it leaves the muzzle of a gun.[1] Muzzle velocities range from approximately 120 m/s (390 ft/s) to 370 m/s (1,200 ft/s) in black powder muskets,[2] to more than 1,200 m/s (3,900 ft/s)[3] in modern rifles with high-performance cartridges such as the .220 Swift
.220 Swift
and .204 Ruger, all the way to 1,700 m/s (5,600 ft/s)[4] for tank guns firing kinetic energy penetrator ammunition
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Rate Of Fire
Rate of fire is the frequency at which a specific weapon can fire or launch its projectiles. It is usually measured in rounds per minute (RPM or round/min), or rounds per second (RPS or round/s). Several different measurements are used. The fastest and most commonly quoted rate is the cyclical rate of fire. However, heat (possibly leading to weapon failure) and exhaustion of ammunition mean most automatic weapons are unlikely to sustain their cyclic rate of fire for a full minute
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Action (firearms)
In firearms terminology, an action is the mechanism that handles the ammunition (loads, locks, fires, extracts and ejects) or the method by which that mechanism works. Breech-loading weapons have actions; actions are technically not present on muzzleloaders, as all are single-shot weapons with a closed off breech. Actions can be categorized in several ways, including single action versus double action, break action versus bolt action, and others. The term action can also include short, long, and magnum if it is in reference to the length of the rifle’s receiver and the length of the bolt. The short action rifle usually can accommodate a cartridge length of 2.8 in (71 mm) or smaller
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Cartridge (firearms)
A cartridge is a type of firearm ammunition packaging a projectile (bullet, shots or slug), a propellant substance (usually either smokeless powder or black powder) and an ignition device (primer) in a metallic, paper or plastic cartridge that fits the barrel chamber of a breechloading gun, for the practical purpose of convenient transportation and shooting.[1] Although in popular usage the term "bullet" is often used to refer to a complete cartridge, it is correctly used only to refer to the projectile. Cartridges can be categorized by the type of their primers — a small charge of an impact- or electric-sensitive chemical mixture that is located at the center of the case head (centerfire), inside the rim of the case base (rimfire and the now obsolete cupfire), in a sideway projection that is shaped like pin (pinfire, now obsolete) or a lip (lipfire, now obsolete), or in a small nipple-like bulge at the case base (teat-fire, now obsolete). Military and commercial producers continue t
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Gun Barrel
A gun barrel is a crucial part of gun-type ranged weapons such as small firearms, artillery pieces and air guns. It is the straight shooting tube, usually made of rigid high-strength metal, through which a contained rapid expansion of high-pressure gas(es) is introduced (via propellant combustion or via mechanical compression) behind a projectile in order to propel it out of the front end (muzzle) at a high velocity. The hollow interior of the barrel is called the bore. The measurement of the diameter of the bore is called the caliber
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Battle Of Dunkirk
German tactical victorySuccess of Operation Dynamo Allies evacuate approx. 85% of stranded troopsTerritorial changes Allied forces withdraw to BritainBelligerents United Kingdom British India[1] France Morocco Poland  Belgium  Canada  Netherlands[2]  GermanyCommanders and leaders Lord Gort Maxime Weygand Georges Blanchard René Prioux J. M. Abrial[4] Gerd von Rundstedt Ewald von Kleist (Panzergruppe von Kleist)Strengthapprox. 400,000 338,226 evacuated[5] approx
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Berkshire
Berkshire
Berkshire
(/ˈbɑːrkʃər/, abbreviated Berks, in the 17th century sometimes spelled Barkeshire as it is pronounced) is a county in south east England, west of London
London
and is one of the home counties. It was recognised by the Queen as the Royal County of Berkshire
Berkshire
in 1957 because of the presence of Windsor Castle, and letters patent were issued in 1974.[2][3] Berkshire
Berkshire
is a county of historic origin and is a home county, a ceremonial county and a non-metropolitan county without a county council. The historic boundary to the north of Berkshire
Berkshire
follows the River Thames, from Buscot
Buscot
to Old Windsor
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Order Of The British Empire
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire
British Empire
is a British order of chivalry, rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the Civil service.[2] It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V, and comprises five classes across both civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male or dame if female.[3] There is also the related British Empire Medal, whose recipients are affiliated with, but not members of, the order. Recommendations for appointments to the Order of the British Empire were at first made on the nomination of the United Kingdom, the self-governing Dominions
Dominions
of the Empire (later Commonwealth) and the Viceroy of India
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Ministry Of Supply (UK)
The Ministry of Supply (MoS) was a department of the UK Government formed in 1939 to co-ordinate the supply of equipment to all three British armed forces, headed by the Minister of Supply. There was, however, a separate ministry responsible for aircraft production, and the Admiralty retained responsibilities for supplying the Royal Navy.[1] During the war years the MoS was based at Shell Mex House in The Strand, London. The Ministry of Supply also took over all army research establishments in 1939.[2] The Ministry of Aircraft Production was abolished in 1946, and the MoS took over its responsibilities for aircraft, including the associated research establishments. In the same year it also took on increased responsibilities for atomic weapons, including the H-bomb development programme. The Ministry of Supply was abolished in 1959 and its responsibilities passed to the Ministry of Aviation, the War Office and the Air Ministry
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Punjab Insurgency
The insurgency in Punjab originated in the late 1970s, as some Sikhs, including Khalistan proponents, turned to militancy. The roots of the insurgency were very complex with the main factors being inadequate recognition of Sikhism and the Punjabi language and mistreatment from the Indian Congress Government since its formation in 1947. With all schools in Punjab teaching Punjabi children Hindi even after Punjab's linguistic reorganisation, parents and community leaders started to become concerned.[3] The Punjabi Suba civil movement was started to address the language issue and restore Punjabi as the official language of Punjab
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Acronym
An acronym is a word or name formed as an abbreviation from the initial components in a phrase or a word, usually individual letters (as in NATO
NATO
or laser) and sometimes syllables (as in Benelux). There are no universal standards of the multiple names for such abbreviations and of their orthographic styling. In English and most other languages, such abbreviations historically had limited use, but they became much more common in the 20th century
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Indo-Pakistan Wars
Since the partition of British India in 1947 and creation of modern states of India and Pakistan, the two South Asian countries have been involved in four wars, including one undeclared war, and many border skirmishes and military stand-offs. The Kashmir issue has been the main cause, whether direct or indirect, of all major conflicts between the two countries with the exception of the Indo-Pakistani War of 1971 where conflict originated due to turmoil in erstwhile East Pakistan (now Bangladesh).Contents1 Background 2 Wars2.1 Indo-Pakistani War of 1947 2.2 Indo-Pakistani War of 1965 2.3 Indo-Pakistani War of 1971 2.4 Indo-Pakistani War of 19993 Other armed engagements3.1 Standing armed conflicts 3.2 Past skirmishes and standoffs4 Incidents 5 Nuclear-arms race 6 Annual celebrations 7 Involvement of other nations 8 In popular culture8.1 Indian films 8.2 Pakistani films 8.3 Pakistani miniseries and dramas9 See also 10 References 11 B
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