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Steine House
Steine House
Steine House
is the former residence of Maria Fitzherbert, mistress and wife of the Prince Regent, in the centre of Brighton, part of the English city of Brighton
Brighton
and Hove. Designed in 1804 by William Porden, who was responsible for many buildings on the Prince's Royal Pavilion estate, it was used by Fitzherbert until her death 33 years later. Regular rebuilding has affected the appearance of the house since 1805, when it was damaged by a storm; more changes took place in 1884, when the YMCA
YMCA
bought it, and the building was "cruelly treated" by a refronting and extension in 1927. The YMCA
YMCA
continue to use the building, on Brighton's Old Steine
Old Steine
next to Marlborough House, as a 65-person hostel
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Old Steine
The Old Steine (/ˈstiːn/) is a thoroughfare in central Brighton, East Sussex, and is the southern terminus of the A23. The southern end leads to Marine Parade, the Brighton seafront and the Palace Pier. The Old Steine is also the site of a number of City Centre bus stops for Brighton buses. The Royal Pavilion is located immediately to the north of the Old Steine. History[edit] The Old Steyne was originally an open green with a stream running adjacent to the easternmost dwellings of Brighthelmstone. The area was used by local fishermen to lay out and dry their nets. When Brighton started to become fashionable in the late 18th century, the area became the centre for visitors. Building around the area started in 1760, and railings started to appear around the green area in the 1770s, reducing its size. This continued throughout the 19th century. The eastern lawns of the Royal Pavilion were also originally part of the Old Steine.[1] Dr
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Fretwork
Fretwork
Fretwork
is an interlaced decorative design that is either carved in low relief on a solid background, or cut out with a fretsaw, coping saw, jigsaw or scroll saw. Most fretwork patterns are geometric in design. The materials most commonly used are wood and metal.[1] Fretwork
Fretwork
is used to adorn furniture and musical instruments. The term is also used for tracery on glazed windows and doors. Fretwork
Fretwork
is also used to adorn/decorate architecture, where specific elements of decor are named according to their use such as eave bracket, gable fretwork or baluster fretwork, which may be of metal, especially cast iron or aluminum. Fretwork
Fretwork
patterns originally were ornamental designs used to decorate objects with a grid or a lattice. Designs have developed from the rectangular wave Greek fret to intricate intertwined patterns
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Social Club
A social club may be a group of people or the place where they meet, generally formed around a common interest, occupation, or activity. Examples include: anime clubs, book discussion clubs, charity work, chess clubs, country clubs, criminal headquarters (e.g., the Cage[1][2] or the Ravenite Social Club), final club, fishing, gentlemen's clubs (known as private clubs in the US), hunting clubs, military officers' clubs, politics clubs, science clubs, university clubs. This article covers only three distinct types of social clubs: the historic gentlemen's clubs, the modern activities clubs, and an introduction to fraternities and sororities. This article does not cover a variety of other types of clubs having some social characteristics.Contents1 History 2 Legalities2.1 England and Wales 2.2 United States of America3 Social activities clubs 4 Sororities and fraternities 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit]This section does not cite any sources
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Earl Of Barrymore
Earl
Earl
of Barrymore was a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created for David Barry, 6th Viscount
Viscount
Buttevant, in 1627/28.[1] Lord Barrymore held the subsidiary titles of Baron
Baron
Barry (created c. 1261) and Viscount
Viscount
Buttevant
Buttevant
(created 1541) in the County of Cork
County of Cork
in Ireland. After the death of the 8th Earl
Earl
in 1823, all these titles became extinct.[2] The Barrymore title was revived in 1902 in favour of Sir Arthur Smith-Barry, who was created Baron
Baron
Barrymore in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. He was the grandson of John Smith Barry, illegitimate son of James Hugh Smith Barry (died 1837), son of The Hon
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Bamboo
The bamboos /bæmˈbuː/ ( listen) are evergreen perennial flowering plants in the subfamily Bambusoideae of the grass family Poaceae. In bamboo, as in other grasses, the internodal regions of the stem are usually hollow and the vascular bundles in the cross section are scattered throughout the stem instead of in a cylindrical arrangement. The dicotyledonous woody xylem is also absent. The absence of secondary growth wood causes the stems of monocots, including the palms and large bamboos, to be columnar rather than tapering.[3] Bamboos include some of the fastest-growing plants in the world,[4] due to a unique rhizome-dependent system. Certain species of bamboo can grow 91 cm (36 in) within a 24-hour period, at a rate of almost 4 cm (1.6 in) an hour (a growth around 1 mm every 90 seconds, or 1 inch every 40 minutes).[5] Giant bamboos are the largest members of the grass family
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Stucco
Stucco
Stucco
or render is a material made of aggregates, a binder and water. Stucco
Stucco
is applied wet and hardens to a very dense solid. It is used as a decorative coating for walls and ceilings, and as a sculptural and artistic material in architecture. Stucco
Stucco
may be used to cover less visually appealing construction materials, such as metal, concrete, cinder block, or clay brick and adobe. In English, stucco usually refers to a coating for the outside of a building and plaster one for interiors; as described below, the material itself is often little different
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Mansard Roof
A mansard or mansard roof (also called a French roof or curb roof) is a four-sided gambrel-style hip roof characterized by two slopes on each of its sides with the lower slope, punctured by dormer windows, at a steeper angle than the upper.[1][2][3] The steep roof with windows creates an additional floor of habitable space[4] (a garret), and reduces the overall height of the roof for a given number of habitable stories. The upper slope of the roof may not be visible from street level when viewed from close proximity to the building. The earliest known example of a mansard roof is credited to Pierre Lescot on part of the Louvre
Louvre
built around 1550
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Pilaster
The pilaster is an architectural element in classical architecture used to give the appearance of a supporting column and to articulate an extent of wall, with only an ornamental function. It consists of a flat surface raised from the main wall surface, usually treated as though it were a column, with a capital at the top, plinth (base) at the bottom, and the various other elements. In contrast to a pilaster, an engaged column or buttress can support the structure of a wall and roof above.Contents1 Definition 2 Gallery 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesDefinition[edit] In discussing Leon Battista Alberti's use of pilasters, which Alberti reintroduced into wall-architecture, Rudolf Wittkower
Rudolf Wittkower
wrote, "The pilaster is the logical transformation of the column for the decoration of a wall
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Corbel
In architecture a corbel is a structural piece of stone, wood or metal jutting from a wall to carry a superincumbent weight, a type of bracket.[1] A corbel is a solid piece of material in the wall, whereas a console is a piece applied to the structure
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Architrave
An architrave (/ˈɑːrkɪtreɪv/; from Italian: architrave "chief beam", also called an epistyle; from Greek ἐπίστυλον epistylon "door frame") is the lintel or beam that rests on the capitals of the columns. It is an architectural element in Classical architecture. The term can also be applied to all sides, including the vertical members, of a frame with mouldings around a door or window
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Pier (architecture)
A pier, in architecture, is an upright support for a structure or superstructure such as an arch or bridge. Sections of structural walls between openings (bays) can function as piers.Contents1 Description 2 Bridge
Bridge
piers 3 Examples3.1 St Peter's Basilica4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] The simplest cross section of the pier is square, or rectangular, but other shapes are also common. In medieval architecture, massive circular supports called drum piers, cruciform (cross-shaped) piers, and compound piers are common architectural elements. Columns are a similar upright support, but stand on a round base
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Dormer
A dormer is a roofed structure, often containing a window, that projects vertically beyond the plane of a pitched roof.[1] It is also known as rooftop window. Dormers are commonly used to increase the usable space in a loft and to create window openings in a roof plane.[2] The term "dormer" is commonly used to refer to a "dormer window" although a dormer does not necessarily contain a window. A dormer is often one of the primary elements of a loft conversion. As a prominent element of many buildings, different types of dormer have evolved to complement different styles of architecture
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Baluster
A baluster—also called spindle or stair stick[citation needed]—is a moulded shaft, square or of lathe-turned form, cut from a rectangular or square plank, one of various forms of spindle in woodwork, made of stone or wood and sometimes of metal,[1] standing on a unifying footing, and supporting the coping of a parapet or the handrail of a staircase.[2] Multiplied in this way, they form a balustrade.[3] Individually, a baluster shaft may describe the turned form taken by a brass or silver candlestick, an upright furniture support, or the stem of a brass chandelier, etc.A balustradeSwelling form of the half-open flower of Punica granatum, in Italian balaustraContents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Profiles and style changes 4 Modern materials used 5 Banisters 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksEtymology[edit] According to OED, "baluster" is derived through the French: balustre, from Italian: balaustro, from balaustra, "pomegranate flower" [from
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John Wilson Croker
John Wilson Croker (20 December 1780 – 10 August 1857) was an Irish statesman and author.Contents1 Life 2 Parliamentary career 3 Literary career 4 Legacy 5 Books and articles about Croker 6 References 7 External linksLife[edit] He was born in Galway, the only son of John Croker, the surveyor-general of customs and excise in Ireland. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he graduated in 1800. Immediately afterwards he entered Lincoln's Inn, and in 1802 he was called to the Irish bar.[1] His interest in the French Revolution led him to collect a large number of valuable documents on the subject, which are now in the British Museum. In 1804 he published anonymously Familiar Epistles to J. F
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Historic England
Historic England
Historic England
(officially the Historic Buildings and Monuments Commission for England) is an executive non-departmental public body of the British Government sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS)
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