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Steele Prize
The Leroy P. Steele Prizes are awarded every year by the American Mathematical Society, for distinguished research work and writing in the field of mathematics. Since 1993 there has been a formal division into three categories. The prizes have been given since 1970, from a bequest of Leroy P. Steele, and were set up in honor of George David Birkhoff, William Fogg Osgood and William Caspar Graustein. The way the prizes are awarded was changed in 1976 and 1993, but the initial aim of honoring expository writing as well as research has been retained. The prizes of $5,000 are not given on a strict national basis, but relate to mathematical activity in the USA, and writing in English (originally, or in translation).Contents1 Steele Prize for Lifetime Achievement 2 Steele Prize for Mathematical Exposition 3 Steele Prize for Seminal Contribution to Research 4 Leroy P
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American Mathematical Society
The American Mathematical Society
American Mathematical Society
(AMS) is an association of professional mathematicians dedicated to the interests of mathematical research and scholarship, and serves the national and international community through its publications, meetings, advocacy and other programs. The society is one of the four parts of the Joint Policy Board for Mathematics
Mathematics
and a member of the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences.Contents1 History 2 Meetings 3 Fellows 4 Publications 5 Prizes 6 Typesetting 7 Presidents7.1 1888–1900 7.2 1901–1950 7.3 1951–2000 7.4 2001–present8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] The AMS was founded in 1888 as the New York Mathematical Society, the brainchild of Thomas Fiske, who was impressed by the London Mathematical Society on a visit to England
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Donal O'Shea
Donal O'Shea
Donal O'Shea
is a Canadian mathematician, who is also noted for his bestselling books.[1] He is currently the fifth president of New College of Florida in Sarasota, a position to which he was named on July 1, 2012
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Ralph S. Phillips
Ralph Saul Phillips (23 June 1913 – 23 November 1998) was an American mathematician and academic known for his contributions to functional analysis, scattering theory, and servomechanisms. He served as a Professor of mathematics at Stanford University. He made major contributions to acoustical scattering theory in collaboration with Peter Lax, proving remarkable results on local energy decay and the connections between poles of the scattering matrix and the analytic properties of the resolvent. With Lax, he coauthored the widely referred book on scattering theory titled Scattering Theory for Automorphic Functions. Phillips received the 1997 Leroy P. Steele Prize for Lifetime Achievement.[2]Contents1 Education and career 2 Books 3 References 4 External linksEducation and career[edit] Phillips was born in Oakland on 23 June 1913. He received his bachelor's degree from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) in 1935 and his Ph.D
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Goro Shimura
Goro Shimura (志村 五郎, Shimura Gorō, born 23 February 1930) is a Japanese mathematician, and currently a professor emeritus of mathematics (former Michael Henry Strater Chair) at Princeton University.Contents1 Life and career 2 See also 3 Works3.1 Mathematical books 3.2 Non-fiction 3.3 Collected papers4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Shimura was a colleague and a friend of Yutaka Taniyama. They wrote a book (the first book treatment) on the complex multiplication of abelian varieties, an area which in collaboration they had opened up. Shimura then wrote a long series of major papers, extending the phenomena found in the theory of complex multiplication and modular forms to higher dimensions (amongst other results). This work (and other developments it provoked) provided some of the 'raw data' later incorporated into the Langlands program
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John T. Tate
John Torrence Tate Jr. (born March 13, 1925) is an American mathematician, distinguished for many fundamental contributions in algebraic number theory, arithmetic geometry and related areas in algebraic geometry. He is professor emeritus at Harvard University. He was awarded the Abel Prize
Abel Prize
in 2010.Contents1 Biography 2 Mathematical work 3 Awards and honors 4 Selected publications 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Tate was born in Minneapolis. His father, John Tate
John Tate
Sr., was a professor of physics at the University of Minnesota, and a longtime editor of Physical Review. His mother, Lois Beatrice Fossler, was a high school English teacher. Tate Jr. received his bachelor's degree in mathematics from Harvard University, and entered the doctoral program in physics at Princeton University. He later transferred to the mathematics department and received his PhD in 1950 as a student of Emil Artin
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Louis Nirenberg
Louis Nirenberg
Louis Nirenberg
(born 28 February 1925) is a Canadian American mathematician, considered one of the outstanding analysts of the 20th century.[1] He has made fundamental contributions to linear and nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) and their application to complex analysis and geometry
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Eugene B. Dynkin
Eugene Borisovich Dynkin (Russian: Евге́ний Бори́сович Ды́нкин; 11 May 1924 – 14 November 2014) was a Soviet and American mathematician.[1] He has made contributions to the fields of probability and algebra, especially semisimple Lie groups, Lie algebras, and Markov processes
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Martin Aigner
Martin Aigner
Martin Aigner
(born February 28, 1942 in Linz) is an Austrian mathematician, professor at Freie Universität Berlin
Freie Universität Berlin
since 1974, with interests in combinatorial mathematics and graph theory.[1][2] He received Ph.D from the University of Vienna. His book Proofs from THE BOOK (co-written with Günter M. Ziegler) has been translated into 12 languages.[3] He is a recipient of a 1996 Lester R. Ford Award from the MAA for his expository article Turán's Graph Theorem.[4] In 2018 he will receive the Leroy P. Steele Prize for Mathematical Exposition (jointly with Günter M. Ziegler).[5] Bibliography[edit] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.Combinatorial Theory (1997 reprint: ISBN 3-540-61787-6, 1979: ISBN 3-540-90376-3; ) (with Günter M
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Günter M. Ziegler
Günther or Gunther and variants, Günter or Gunter, are Germanic names derived from Gunthere, Gunthari, composed of *gunþiz "battle" ( Old Norse
Old Norse
gunnr) and heri, hari "army"
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Dusa McDuff
BMS Morning Speaker[1] Satter Prize
Satter Prize
(1991) Fellow of the Royal Society Corresponding Fellow of the Royal Society
Fellow of the Royal Society
of Edinburgh
Edinburgh
(2008) Speaker at International Congress of Mathematicians BMC Plenary Speaker[2]Scientific careerFields MathematicsInstitutions University of Cambridge University of York University of Warwick Massachusetts Institute of Technology Institute for Advanced Study Stony Brook University Barnard CollegeDoctoral advisor George A. Reid[3]Doctoral students Katrin Wehrheim Dusa McDuff
Dusa McDuff
FRS Corr FRSE
FRSE
(born 18 October 1945) is an English mathematician who works on symplectic geometry
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David A. Cox
David Archibald Cox (born September 23, 1948 in Washington, D.C.)[1] is an American mathematician, working in algebraic geometry. Cox graduated from Rice University
Rice University
with a bachelor's degree in 1970 and his Ph.D. in 1975 at Princeton University, under the supervision of Eric Friedlander
Eric Friedlander
(Tubular Neighborhoods in the Etale Topology).[2] From 1974 to 1975, he was assistant professor at Haverford College
Haverford College
and at Rutgers University
Rutgers University
from 1975 to 1979. In 1979, he became assistant professor and in 1988 professor at Amherst College. He studies, among other things, étale homotopy theory, elliptic surfaces, computer-based algebraic geometry (such as Gröbner basis), Torelli sets and toric varieties, and history of mathematics. He is also known for several textbooks
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Robert Lazarsfeld
Robert Kendall Lazarsfeld (born April 15, 1953) is an American mathematician, currently a professor at Stony Brook University.[1] He was previously the Raymond L Wilder Collegiate Professor of Mathematics
Mathematics
at the University of Michigan.[2] He is the son of sociologist Paul Lazarsfeld. His research focuses on algebraic geometry and from 2012–2013 he served as the Managing Editor of the Michigan Mathematical Journal.[3] Lazarsfeld went to Harvard for Undergrad and earned his doctorate from Brown University
Brown University
in 1980, under supervision of William Fulton.[4] In 2006 Lazarsfeld was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[5] In 2012 he became a fellow of the American Mathematical Society.[6] In 2015 he was awarded the AMS Leroy P. Steele Prize for Mathematical Exposition.[7] Selected works[edit]Lazarsfeld, Robert (2004). Positivity in algebraic geometry, Vol. I. Berlin: Springer
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Isadore M. Singer
Isadore Manuel Singer (born May 3, 1924) is an American mathematician. He is an Institute Professor
Institute Professor
in the Department of Mathematics
Mathematics
at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is noted for his work with Michael Atiyah
Michael Atiyah
proving the Atiyah–Singer index theorem in 1962, which paved the way for new interactions between pure mathematics and theoretical physics.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Awards and honors 3 Works 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] Singer was born in Detroit, Michigan, and received his undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan
University of Michigan
in 1944.[2] After obtaining his M.S. and Ph.D
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Yuri Burago
Yuri Dmitrievich Burago (Russian: Ю́рий Дми́триевич Бура́го) (born 1936) is a Russian mathematician. He works in differential and convex geometry.Contents1 Education and career 2 Works 3 Students 4 Footnotes 5 External linksEducation and career[edit] Burago studied at Leningrad University, where he obtained his Ph.D. and Habilitation degrees. His advisors were Victor Zalgaller
Victor Zalgaller
and Aleksandr Aleksandrov. Burago is the head of the Laboratory of Geometry and Topology that is part of the St. Petersburg Department of Steklov Institute of Mathematics.[1] He took part in a report for the United States Civilian Research and Development Foundation for the Independent States of the former Soviet Union.[2] Works[edit]Burago, Dmitri; Yuri Burago; Sergei Ivanov (2001-06-12) [1984]. A Course in Metric Geometry
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John Guckenheimer
John Mark Guckenheimer (born 1945) joined the Department of Mathematics at Cornell University
Cornell University
in 1985. He was previously at the University of California at Santa Cruz
University of California at Santa Cruz
(1973-1985). He was a Guggenheim fellow in 1984, and was elected president of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) and served as president 1997-1998.[1] Guckenheimer received his B.A. from Harvard University in 1966 and his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley
University of California at Berkeley
in 1970.[2] His Ph.D
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