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State Street (Manhattan)
State Street is a short street in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City. It runs from west Whitehall Street as a continuation of Water Street, then turns north at Battery Park
Battery Park
to become its eastern border. Passing Pearl and Bridge Streets, it terminates at the northeast corner of the park, at Bowling Green, where the roadway continues north as Broadway and west as Battery Place. State Street approximates the original waterline of the island before landfill expanded it. History[edit] According to the Castello Plan
Castello Plan
of 1660, the original fort built by Dutch settlers for New Amsterdam, Fort Amsterdam, was located where State Street is now. In 1790, the State House or Government House was built on the site of the fort. The street was originally called "Copsey Street" after the Native American village of Kopsee, which had been located nearby
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New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
Coordinates: 40°42′47″N 74°00′14″W / 40.71295°N 74.00377°W / 40.71295; -74.00377The demolition of Pennsylvania Station was a key moment in the preservationist movement, which led to the creation of the CommissionThe New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
(LPC) is the New York City agency charged with administering the city's Landmarks Preservation Law. The Commission was created in April 1965 by Mayor Robert F. Wagner, Jr.[1] following the destruction of Pennsylvania Station the previous year to make way for the construction of the current Madison Square Garden. The Commission is responsible for protecting New York City's architecturally, historically, and culturally significant buildings and sites by granting them landmark or historic district status, and regulating them once they're designated
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Henry Hudson
Henry Hudson
Henry Hudson
(c. 1565–1611) was an English sea explorer and navigator during the early 17th century, best known for his explorations of present-day Canada
Canada
and parts of the northeastern United States.[4] In 1607 and 1608, Hudson made two attempts on behalf of English merchants to find a rumored Northeast Passage
Northeast Passage
to Cathay
Cathay
(present-day China) via a route above the Arctic
Arctic
Circle
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Lighthouse
A lighthouse is a tower, building, or other type of structure designed to emit light from a system of lamps and lenses and to serve as a navigational aid for maritime pilots at sea or on inland waterways. Lighthouses mark dangerous coastlines, hazardous shoals, reefs, and safe entries to harbors; they also assist in aerial navigation
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RMS Titanic
RMS Titanic
Titanic
(/taɪˈtænɪk/) was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton
Southampton
to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff
Harland and Wolff
shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.[2] Titanic
Titanic
was under the command of Edward Smith, who also went down with the ship
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Eggers & Higgins
Higgins
Higgins
may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Places 3 Other 4 See alsoPeople[edit] Higgins
Higgins
(surname), including list of people with the surname (see also Ó hUiginn)Places[edit]


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South Street Seaport
72000883[1] South Street Seaport
South Street Seaport
Historic DistrictU.S. National Register of Historic PlacesLocation Roughly bounded by East River, Brooklyn Bridge, Fletcher Alley, and Pearl and South Streets, Manhattan, New York City, United StatesArea 41 acres (17 ha)Architectural style Greek Revival, RomanesqueNRHP reference # 78001884[1]Added to NRHP December 12, 1978Added to NRHP October 18, 1972The South Street Seaport
South Street Seaport
is a historic area in the New York City borough of Manhattan, centered where Fulton Street meets the East River, and adjacent to the Financial District. The Seaport is a designated historic district, and is distinct from the neighboring Financial District
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Emery Roth
Emery Roth
Emery Roth
(Hungarian: Róth Imre, 1871 – August 20, 1948) was an American architect of Jewish
Jewish
descent who designed many of the definitive New York City
New York City
hotels and apartment buildings of the 1920s and 1930s, incorporating Beaux-Arts and Art Deco
Art Deco
details. His sons continued in the family enterprise, largely expanding the firm under the name Emery Roth
Emery Roth
& Sons.Contents1 Life and career 2 Buildings designed 3 Emery Roth
Emery Roth
& Sons 4 Work by Emery Roth
Emery Roth
& Sons 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksLife and career[edit]This World Columbian Exposition pavilion was designed by the young Roth alone. It housed a temporary shop for the Menier Chocolate Company
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Curtain Wall (architecture)
A curtain wall system is an outer covering of a building in which the outer walls are non-structural, utilized to keep the weather out and the occupants in. Since the curtain wall is non-structural, it can be made of lightweight materials, thereby reducing construction costs. When glass is used as the curtain wall, an advantage is that natural light can penetrate deeper within the building. The curtain wall façade does not carry any structural load from the building other than its own dead load weight. The wall transfers lateral wind loads that are incident upon it to the main building structure through connections at floors or columns of the building
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AIA Guide To New York City
The AIA Guide to New York City
New York City
by Norval White, Elliot Willensky, and Fran Leadon is an extensive catalogue with descriptions, critique and photographs of significant and noteworthy architecture throughout the five boroughs of New York City.[1] Originally published in 1967, the fifth edition, with new co-author Fran Leadon, was published in 2010.[2][3] See also[edit]American Institute of Architects Architecture
Architecture
of New York CityReferences[edit] Notes^ White, Norval, Willensky, Elliot and Leadon, Fran. AIA Guide to New York City (5th edition) New York:Oxford University Press, 2010 ISBN 978-0-19-538385-0 (hardcover) ISBN 978-0-19-538386-7 (paperback) ^ New York Times, April 19, 2009 The Grand Cornice-and-Pediment Tour ^ AIA preview 2010 editionExternal links[edit]Fifth edition on Google Books Fourth edition on Google BooksThis article about a reference book is a stub
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Peter Minuit Plaza
The Whitehall Terminal is a ferry terminal in South Ferry section of Lower Manhattan, New York City, at the corner of South Street and Whitehall Street. It is used by the Staten Island Ferry, which connects the island boroughs of Manhattan and Staten Island. The Whitehall Terminal is one of the ferry's terminals, the other being St. George Terminal on Staten Island. The Whitehall Terminal originally opened in 1903 as a new transportation hub for the Staten Island Ferry, which was in the process of being acquired by the city government. It was renovated from 1953 to 1956 at the cost of $3 million, but by the 1980s, was in a state of deterioration
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Netherlands
The Netherlands
The Netherlands
(/ˈnɛðərləndz/ ( listen); Dutch: Nederland [ˈneːdərˌlɑnt] ( listen)), also known informally as Holland, is a country in Western Europe
Europe
with a population of seventeen million
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Ben Van Berkel
A&W Architect
Architect
of the Year 2017 KUBUS Award 2016 Honorary Fellowship AIA 2013 RIBA International Fellowship 2009 Charles Jencks Award 2007 1822-Kunstpreis 2003 Charlotte Köhler Award 1991 Eileen Gray Award 1983Practice UNStudioBuildings Moebius House Erasmus Bridge Mercedes-Benz Museum Gelleria Center City (Cheonan-si,South Korea) Ben van Berkel
Ben van Berkel
(born 1957) is a Dutch architect; founder and principal architect of the architectural practice UNStudio
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Warren & Wetmore
Warren and Wetmore
Warren and Wetmore
was an architecture firm in New York City
New York City
which was a partnership between Whitney Warren
Whitney Warren
(1864–1943) and Charles Delevan Wetmore (June 10, 1866[1] – May 8, 1941), that had one of the most extensive practices of its time and was known for the designing of large hotels.Contents1 Partners 2 Commissions 3 References 4 External linksPartners[edit] Whitney Warren
Whitney Warren
was a cousin of the Vanderbilts and spent ten years at the École des Beaux Arts. There he met fellow architecture student Emmanuel Louis Masqueray, who would, in 1897 join the Warren and Wetmore firm. He began practice in New York City
New York City
in 1887. Warren's partner, Charles Delevan Wetmore (usually referred to as Charles D. Wetmore), was a lawyer by training
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Caroline Bos
Caroline Bos (born 1959, Rotterdam) is a Dutch architect. She is a co-founder of UNStudio, a large award-winning architecture firm in Amsterdam. Bos writes, lectures and teaches architecture at various schools.[1] Her architectural drawings and models are shown at museums like MoMA.[2]Contents1 Education 2 Work 3 References 4 External linksEducation[edit] Bos received a bachelor of arts in art history from Birkbeck, University of London in 1991.[1] She later obtained a master's degree in architecture at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. It was in London that she first met her husband, Ben van Berkel.[3] Work[edit]Mercedes-Benz Museum at nightBos first worked as a journalist with husband, Ben van Berkel[4] on publications such as Forum (1985–86) and "Diagram Works" (1988).[5] Bos and van Berkel, founded Berkel & Bos Architectuurbureau in Amsterdam in 1988
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LED
A light-emitting diode (LED) is a two-lead semiconductor light source. It is a p–n junction diode that emits light when activated.[5] When a suitable current is applied to the leads,[6][7] electrons are able to recombine with electron holes within the device, releasing energy in the form of photons. This effect is called electroluminescence, and the color of the light (corresponding to the energy of the photon) is determined by the energy band gap of the semiconductor. LEDs
LEDs
are typically small (less than 1 mm2) and integrated optical components may be used to shape the radiation pattern.[8] Appearing as practical electronic components in 1962, the earliest LEDs
LEDs
emitted low-intensity infrared light.[9] Infrared
Infrared
LEDs
LEDs
are still frequently used as transmitting elements in remote-control circuits, such as those in remote controls for a wide variety of consumer electronics
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