HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

State Emblem Of The Soviet Union
An emblem is an abstract or representational pictorial image that represents a concept, like a moral truth, or an allegory, or a person, like a king or saint.[1]Contents1 Emblems vs. symbols 2 Other terminology 3 Emblems in history 4 Emblems in speech4.1 Emblems vs. sign language5 Emblems in culture 6 See also 7 References7.1 Further reading8 Notes 9 External linksEmblems vs. symbols[edit] Although the words emblem and symbol are often used interchangeably, an emblem is a pattern that is used to represent an idea or an individual. An emblem crystallizes in concrete, visual terms some abstraction: a deity, a tribe or nation, or a virtue or vice.[clarification needed] An emblem may be worn or otherwise used as an identifying badge or patch. For example, in America, police officers' badges refer to their personal metal emblem whereas their woven emblems on uniforms identify members of a particular unit
[...More...]

picture info

Emblems (album)
Emblems is the fifth album by Matt Pond PA, released in 2004.Professional ratingsAggregate scoresSource RatingMetacritic 70/100 linkReview scoresSource RatingAllmusic linkTrack listing[edit]"KC" – 2:53 "Closest (Look Out)" – 4:48 "Lily Two" – 4:03 "Bring on the Ending" – 4:14 "The Butcher" – 4:15 "New Hampshire" – 4:50 "Claire" – 3:03 "Summer (Butcher Two)" – 4:27 "East Coast E." – 4:00 "Last Song" – 4:06 "Grave's Disease" – 4:23 "Close (KC Two)" – 4:49v t eMatt Pond PAMatt Pond Chris Hansen Leslie Sisson George Souleidis Dan Crowell Cait CigrandStudio albums Deer Apartments
[...More...]

picture info

Red Cross
The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement
International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement
is an international humanitarian movement with approximately 97 million volunteers, members and staff worldwide[2] which was founded to protect human life and health, to ensure respect for all human beings, and to prevent and alleviate human suffering. The movement consists of several distinct organizations that are legally independent from each other, but are united within the movement through common basic principles, objectives, symbols, statutes and governing organisations. The movement's parts are:The International Committee of the Red Cross
International Committee of the Red Cross
(ICRC) is a private humanitarian institution founded in 1863 in Geneva, Switzerland, in particular by Henry Dunant
Henry Dunant
and Gustave Moynier
[...More...]

picture info

Boar
The wild boar (Sus scrofa), also known as the wild swine[3] Eurasian wild pig,[4] or simply wild pig,[5] is a suid native to much of Eurasia, North Africa, and the Greater Sunda Islands. Human intervention has spread its distribution further, making the species one of the widest-ranging mammals in the world, as well as the most widely spread suiform.[4] Its wide range, high numbers, and adaptability mean that it is classed as least concern by the IUCN[1] and it has become an invasive species in part of its introduced range. The animal probably originated in Southeast Asia during the Early Pleistocene,[6] and outcompeted other suid species as it spread throughout the Old World.[7] As of 1990, up to 16 subspecies are recognized, which are divided into four regional groupings based on skull height and lacrimal bone length.[2] The species lives in matriarchal societies consisting of interrelated females and their young (both male and female)
[...More...]

picture info

Richard III Of England
Richard III (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485) was King of England from 1483 until his death at the Battle of Bosworth Field. He was the last king of the House of York
House of York
and the last of the Plantagenet dynasty. His defeat at Bosworth Field, the last decisive battle of the Wars of the Roses, marked the end of the Middle Ages in England. He is the protagonist of Richard III, one of William Shakespeare's history plays. When his brother King Edward IV
King Edward IV
died in April 1483, Richard was named Lord Protector
Lord Protector
of the realm for Edward's eldest son and successor, the 12-year-old Edward V. Arrangements were made for Edward's coronation on 22 June 1483; but, before the young king could be crowned, the marriage of his parents was declared bigamous and therefore invalid, making their children officially illegitimate and barring them from inheriting the throne
[...More...]

picture info

Armillary Sphere
An armillary sphere (variations are known as spherical astrolabe, armilla, or armil) is a model of objects in the sky (on the celestial sphere), consisting of a spherical framework of rings, centred on Earth
Earth
or the Sun, that represent lines of celestial longitude and latitude and other astronomically important features, such as the ecliptic. As such, it differs from a celestial globe, which is a smooth sphere whose principal purpose is to map the constellations. It was invented separately in ancient Greece and ancient China, with later use in the Islamic world
Islamic world
and Medieval Europe. With the Earth
Earth
as center, an armillary sphere is known as Ptolemaic. With the Sun
Sun
as center, it is known as Copernican.[1] The flag of Portugal
Portugal
features an armillary sphere
[...More...]

picture info

Manuel I Of Portugal
Dom Manuel I[a] (European Portuguese: [mɐnuˈɛɫ]; 31 May 1469 – 13 December 1521), the Fortunate (Port. o Afortunado), King of Portugal and the Algarves, was the son of Ferdinand, Duke of Viseu, by his wife, the Infanta Beatrice of Portugal. His name is associated with a period of Portuguese civilization that was distinguished by significant achievements both in political affairs and the arts
[...More...]

picture info

Medal
A medal or medallion is a small portable artistic object, a thin disc, normally of metal, carrying a design, usually on both sides. They typically have a commemorative purpose of some kind, and many are given as awards. They may be intended to be worn, suspended from clothing or jewellery in some way. They are traditionally struck like a coin by dies. A medal may be awarded to a person or organization as a form of recognition for sporting, military, scientific, cultural, academic, or various other achievements. Military awards and decorations
Military awards and decorations
are more precise terms for certain types of state decoration. Medals may also be created for sale to commemorate particular individuals or events, or as works of artistic expression in their own right
[...More...]

picture info

Obverse And Reverse
Obverse and its opposite, reverse, refer to the two flat faces of coins and some other two-sided objects, including paper money, flags, seals, medals, drawings, old master prints and other works of art, and printed fabrics. In this usage, obverse means the front face of the object and reverse means the back face. The obverse of a coin is commonly called heads, because it often depicts the head of a prominent person, and the reverse tails. In fields of scholarship outside numismatics, the term front is more commonly used than obverse, while usage of reverse is widespread. The equivalent terms used in codicology, manuscript studies, print studies and publishing are "recto" and "verso".Contents1 Identification 2 Modern coins 3 Specific currencies3.1 Coins of the European Union 3.2 Coins of Japan 3.3 Coins of the United Kingdom 3.4 Coins of the United States4 See also 5 ReferencesIdentification[edit]This section does not cite any sources
[...More...]

picture info

Diplomatic Gift
A diplomatic gift is a gift given by a diplomat, politician or leader when visiting a foreign country. Usually the gift is reciprocated by the host. The use of diplomatic gifts dates back to the ancient world and givers have competed to outdo each other in the lavishness of their gifts
[...More...]

picture info

Pisanello
Pisanello
Pisanello
(c. 1395 – c. 1455), known professionally as Antonio di Puccio Pisano or Antonio di Puccio da Cereto, also erroneously called Vittore Pisano by Giorgio Vasari, was one of the most distinguished painters of the early Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance
and Quattrocento
[...More...]

picture info

Christian Cross
The Christian cross, seen as a representation of the instrument of the crucifixion of Jesus, is the best-known symbol of Christianity.[1] It is related to the crucifix (a cross that includes a usually three-dimensional representation of Jesus' body) and to the more general family of cross symbols. The basic forms of the cross are the Latin cross
Latin cross
(✝) and the Greek cross (✚), with numerous variants used in text, visual art, heraldry, and in various confessional contexts.Contents1 History of use1.1 Pre-Christian 1.2 Instrument of execution 1.3 Early Christian2 In contemporary Christianity 3 Exclusion 4 Notable individual crosses 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory of use[edit] Pre-Christian[edit] Main article: CrossThis section may stray from the topic of the article. Please help improve this section or discuss this issue on the talk page
[...More...]

picture info

Crucifixion
Crucifixion
Crucifixion
is a method of capital punishment in which the victim is tied or nailed to a large wooden beam and left to hang for several days until eventual death from exhaustion and asphyxiation.[1][2][3] The crucifixion of Jesus is a central narrative in Christianity, and the cross (sometimes depicting Jesus nailed onto it) is the main religious symbol for many Christian
[...More...]

picture info

International Red Cross And Red Crescent Movement
The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement
International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement
is an international humanitarian movement with approximately 97 million volunteers, members and staff worldwide[2] which was founded to protect human life and health, to ensure respect for all human beings, and to prevent and alleviate human suffering. The movement consists of several distinct organizations that are legally independent from each other, but are united within the movement through common basic principles, objectives, symbols, statutes and governing organisations. The movement's parts are:The International Committee of the Red Cross
International Committee of the Red Cross
(ICRC) is a private humanitarian institution founded in 1863 in Geneva, Switzerland, in particular by Henry Dunant
Henry Dunant
and Gustave Moynier
[...More...]

picture info

Salamander (legendary Creature)
The salamander is an amphibian of the order Urodela which, as with many real creatures, often has been ascribed fantastic and sometimes occult qualities by pre-modern authors (as in the allegorical descriptions of animals in medieval bestiaries) not possessed by the real organism
[...More...]

picture info

Crescent
A crescent shape (/ˈkrɛsənt/, British English
British English
also /ˈkrɛzənt/[1]) is a symbol or emblem used to represent the lunar phase in the first quarter (the "sickle moon"), or by extension a symbol representing the Moon
Moon
itself. It is used as the astrological symbol for the Moon, and hence as the alchemical symbol for silver. It was also the emblem of Diana/Artemis, and hence represented virginity
[...More...]

.