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Stars In My Pocket Like Grains Of Sand
Stars in My Pocket Like Grains of Sand
Stars in My Pocket Like Grains of Sand
(1984) is a science fiction novel by Samuel R. Delany. It was part of a planned duology ("diptych", in Delany's description) whose second half, The Splendor and Misery of Bodies, of Cities, remains unfinished.Contents1 Plot summary 2 Major themes2.1 Fractured Subjectivity 2.2 Cleansing3 Genre of Science Fiction 4 Connections to Delany's other work 5 The Splendor and Misery of Bodies, of Cities 6 Popular culture 7 Editions 8 ReferencesPlot summary[edit] The novel takes place in a distant future in which diverse human societies have developed on some 6000 planets. Many of these worlds are shared with intelligent nonhumans, although only one alien species (the mysterious Xlv) also possesses faster-than-light travel
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University Of Massachusetts Amherst
The University of Massachusetts
University of Massachusetts
Amherst (abbreviated UMass Amherst and colloquially referred to as UMass or Massachusetts) is a public research and land-grant university in Amherst, Massachusetts, United States, and the flagship campus of the University of Massachusetts system. With approximately 1,300 faculty members and more than 29,000 students, UMass Amherst is the largest public university in New England[10] and is tied for 27th best public university in the nation.[11] The university offers bachelor's degrees, master's degrees, and doctoral degrees in 111 undergraduate, 75 master's and 47 doctoral programs in nine schools and colleges.[5] The main campus is situated north of downtown Amherst. In a 2009 article for MSN.com, Amherst was ranked first in Best College Towns in the United States.[12] In 2012, U.S. News and World Report
U.S

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Science Fiction
Science
Science
fiction (often shortened to SF or sci-fi) is a genre of speculative fiction, typically dealing with imaginative concepts such as advanced science and technology, spaceflight, time travel, and extraterrestrial life. Science
Science
fiction often explores the potential consequences of scientific and other innovations, and has been called a "literature of ideas".[1] It usually avoids the supernatural, unlike the related genre of fantasy
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Splendor & Misery
Splendor & Misery is the second studio album by experimental hip hop group Clipping, released on September 9, 2016. The music video for "Baby Don't Sleep" was released on July 26, 2016.[5] The second single and music video "Air 'Em Out" was released on August 24, 2016.[6] The album, with a mix of futuristic and classical instrumentation, tells the story of an enslaved person, referred to as Cargo #2331, in the future in outer space. It is an example of afrofuturism. Some of the songs also feature guest vocals from gospel group Take 6
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Clipping (band)
Clipping (stylized as clipping.) is an American experimental hip hop group from Los Angeles, California. The group consists of rapper Daveed Diggs and producers William Hutson and Jonathan Snipes.[4]Contents1 History 2 Style and influences 3 Discography3.1 Albums 3.2 Extended plays 3.3 Mixtapes 3.4 Remix
Remix
Albums 3.5 Singles 3.6 Remixes4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Diggs and Hutson met in grade school, and Hutson and Snipes were college roommates.[6] The group began in 2009 as a remix project, with Hutson and Snipes taking a cappellas of mainstream rap artists and making power electronics and noise remixes of them to amuse themselves
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Telefone (mixtape)
Telefone is the debut mixtape by American hip hop recording artist Noname; it was released on July 31, 2016 as a free digital download. It features guest appearances from Saba, Raury, and Smino, among others. Pitchfork ranked opening track "Yesterday" as the 37th best track of 2016.[1]Contents1 Release and reception1.1 Accolades2 Track listing 3 Personnel 4 ReferencesRelease and reception[edit]Professional ratingsReview scoresSource RatingThe A.V. Club A–[2]Consequence of Sound B+[3]DIY [4]The Guardian [5]Pitchfork 8/10[6]Rolling Stone [7]Telefone was released to rave reviews from fans and critics. The Guardian called it "nostalgic, intricate coming-of-age hip-hop."[8] Pitchfork called it a "stunning debut" and gave the song "Diddy Bop" their "Best New Track" honor, with Jayson Greene writing:"Diddy Bop" is luxurious and easy and warm, a reminiscence about good times, or better ones
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Noname (rapper)
Fatimah Nyeema Warner (born September 18, 1991), better known by her stage name Noname, is an American rapper and poet. Warner is from the Bronzeville neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois, where she began rapping and performing slam poetry in Chicago
Chicago
in 2010.[1] In 2013, she gained wider recognition and critical acclaim following her appearance on the track "Lost" from Chance the Rapper's popular mixtape Acid Rap.[2] Noname released her debut mixtape, Telefone, on July 31, 2016, to widespread critical acclaim.[3][4][5]Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 2010–2015: Early works 2.2 2016–present2.2.1 Name change, success with Telefone mixtape3 Influences 4 Discography4.1 Mixtapes 4.2 Guest appearances5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Noname grew up in the Bronzeville neighborhood of Chicago
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Opus III (band)
Opus III was an English electronic music group who had success on the UK Singles Chart
UK Singles Chart
and on the U.S. Dance charts. The group consisted of vocalist Kirsty Hawkshaw
Kirsty Hawkshaw
and producers/musicians Kevin Dodds, Ian Munro and Nigel Walton. The group members promoted a strong environmental and feminist message through their lyrics, album liner notes and photo and video imagery.Contents1 Biography 2 Discography2.1 Studio albums 2.2 Singles3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Prior to the forming of Opus III, Dodds, Munro, and Walton, who were members of the Spiral Tribe, signed with MCA Records UK under the name A.S.K. The act released their first single, "Dream," in 1990, peaking at number 85 on the UK singles chart.[1] It was also the same year that they noticed a rave dancer that they would add to the act as their visual dancer and afterwards become their lead singer, Kirsty Hawkshaw
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Les Fleurs Du Mal
Les Fleurs du mal
Les Fleurs du mal
(French pronunciation: ​[le flœʁ dy mal]; English: The Flowers of Evil) is a volume of French poetry by Charles Baudelaire. First published in 1857 (see 1857 in poetry), it was important in the symbolist and modernist movements
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Charles Baudelaire
Charles Pierre Baudelaire (/ˌboʊdəlˈɛər/;[1] French: [ʃaʁl bodlɛʁ] ( listen); April 9, 1821 – August 31, 1867) was a French poet who also produced notable work as an essayist, art critic, and pioneering translator of Edgar Allan Poe. His most famous work, Les Fleurs du mal
Les Fleurs du mal
(The Flowers of Evil), expresses the changing nature of beauty in modern, industrializing Paris during the 19th century. Baudelaire's highly original style of prose-poetry influenced a whole generation of poets including Paul Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud
Arthur Rimbaud
and Stéphane Mallarmé
Stéphane Mallarmé
among many others
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Cruising For Sex
Cruising for sex, or cruising, is walking or driving about a locality in search of a sex partner, usually of the anonymous, casual, one-time variety.[1][2] The term is also used when technology is used to find casual sex, such as using an Internet site or a telephone service.[3][4]Contents1 Origin and historical usage 2 Regional usage variants 3 Historic examples of usage 4 In popular culture 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOrigin and historical usage[edit] According to historian and author Tim Blanning, the term cruising originates from the Dutch equivalent kruisen.[5] In a specifically sexual context, the term "cruising" originally emerged as an argot "code word" in gay slang, by which those "in the know" would understand the speaker's unstated sexual intent, whereas most heterosexuals, on hearing the same word in the same context, would normally misread the speaker's intended meaning in the word's more common (and presumably less threatening) nonsexual sense
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Faster-than-light
Faster-than-light
Faster-than-light
(also superluminal or FTL) communication and travel refer to the theoretical propagation of information or matter faster than the speed of light. The special theory of relativity implies that only particles with zero rest mass may travel at the speed of light. Tachyons, particles whose speed exceeds that of light, have been hypothesized but the existence of such particles would violate causality and the consensus of physicists is that such particles cannot exist. On the other hand, what some physicists refer to as "apparent" or "effective" FTL[1][2][3][4] depends on the hypothesis that unusually distorted regions of spacetime might permit matter to reach distant locations in less time than light could in normal or undistorted spacetime
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Library Of Congress Classification
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification (LCC) is a system of library classification developed by the Library of Congress. It is used by most research and academic libraries in the U.S
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Dewey Decimal Classification
The Dewey Decimal Classification
Dewey Decimal Classification
(DDC), or Dewey Decimal System, is a proprietary library classification system first published in the United States by Melvil Dewey
Melvil Dewey
in 1876.[1] It has been revised and expanded through 23 major editions, the latest issued in 2011, and has grown from a four-page pamphlet in 1876. It is also available in an abridged version suitable for smaller libraries. It is currently maintained by the Online Computer Library Center
Online Computer Library Center
(OCLC), a non-profit cooperative that serves libraries. OCLC
OCLC
licenses access to an online version for catalogers called WebDewey. The Decimal Classification introduced the concepts of relative location and relative index which allow new books to be added to a library in their appropriate location based on subject
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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