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Starboard
Port and starboard
Port and starboard
are nautical and aeronautical terms for left and right, respectively. Port is the left-hand side of a vessel or aircraft, facing forward. Starboard is the right-hand side, facing forward. Since port and starboard never change, they are unambiguous references that are not relative to the observer.[2][3] The term starboard derives from the Old English steorbord, meaning the side on which the ship is steered. Before ships had rudders on their centrelines, they were steered with a steering oar at the stern of the ship and, because more people are right-handed, on the right-hand side of it.[2] Since the steering oar was on the right side of the boat, it would tie up at the wharf on the other side. Hence the left side was called port.[4] Formerly, larboard was used instead of port
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Bayeux Tapestry
The Bayeux
Bayeux
Tapestry
Tapestry
(UK: /baɪˈjɜːr/, US: /bɑːˈjuː, beɪ-/; French: Tapisserie de Bayeux, IPA: [tapisʁi də bajø], or La telle du conquest; Latin: Tapete Baiocense) is an embroidered cloth nearly 70 metres (230 ft) long and 50 centimetres (20 in) tall,[1][2][3] which depicts the events leading up to the Norman conquest of England concerning William, Duke of Normandy, and Harold, Earl of Wessex, later King of England, and culminating in the Battle of Hastings. It is thought to date to the 11th century, within a few years after the battle. It tells the story from the point of view of the conquering Normans. According to Sylvette Lemagnen, conservator of the tapestry, in her 2005 book La Tapisserie de Bayeux:The Bayeux
Bayeux
tapestry is one of the supreme achievements of the Norman Romanesque ...
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Cockpit (sailing)
A cockpit is a name for the location of controls of a vessel; while traditionally an open well in the deck of a boat outside any deckhouse or cabin,[1] in modern boats they may refer to an enclosed area.[2] Smaller boats typically have an aft cockpit, towards the stern of the boat, whereas larger vessels may provide a center cockpit with greater protection from weather.[2] On a recreational sailboat, the cockpit is considered the most safe external location for crew.[3] A bridge deck is a raised separation between an external cockpit and cabin or saloon, used to keep water from astern from entering from the cockpit, especially in following seas.[4] History[edit] In the Royal Navy, the term cockpit originally referred to the area where the coxswain was stationed. This led to the word being used to refer to the area towards the stern of a small decked vessel that houses the rudder controls
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Bilge
The bilge (IPA: /bɪldʒ/) is the lowest compartment on a ship or seaplane, below the waterline, where the two sides meet at the keel. The first known use of the word is from 1513.[1]Contents1 Bilge
Bilge
water 2 Bilge
Bilge
maintenance 3 Bilge
Bilge
alarm 4 See also 5 References 6 External links Bilge
Bilge
water[edit] The word is sometimes also used to describe the water that collects in this area. Water that does not drain off the side of the deck drains down through the ship into the bilge. This water may be from rough seas, rain, leaks in the hull or stuffing box, or other interior spillage. The collected water must be pumped out to prevent the bilge from becoming too full and threatening to sink the ship. Bilge
Bilge
water can be found aboard almost every vessel
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Bilgeboard
A bilgeboard is a lifting foil used in a sailboat, which resembles a cross between a centerboard and a leeboard. Bilgeboards are mounted between the centerline of the boat and the sides, and are almost always asymmetric foils mounted at an angle to maximize lateral lift while minimizing drag. They are most often found on racing scows. When sailing, the windward side bilgeboard is retracted into the hull of the boat, so that it produces no drag. The leeward side foil provides the lift to counter the lateral force of the sail, and converts it into forward motion
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Bitts
Bitts
Bitts
are paired vertical wooden or iron posts mounted either aboard a ship or on a wharf, pier or quay. The posts are used to secure mooring lines, ropes, hawsers, or cables.[1] Bitts
Bitts
aboard wooden sailing ships (sometime called cable-bitts) were large vertical timbers mortised into the keel and used as the anchor cable attachment point.[2] Bitts are carefully manufactured and maintained to avoid any sharp edges which might chafe and weaken the mooring lines.[3] Use[edit] Mooring lines may be laid around the bitts either singly or in a figure-8 pattern with the friction against tension increasing with each successive turn
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Boom Brake
A boom brake is a device designed to control the swing of the boom on a sailboat. The boom brake acts as a preventer when sailing downwind, and can also be used to jibe(US) or gybe(UK) the mainsail in a slow measured action. Uncontrolled jibes often damage elements of the rig, and can inflict serious and sometimes fatal injuries to crew in the path of the boom or the mainsheet and associated hardware. The brake usually rides on a line running perpendicular to the boom; when the boom brake is actuated, it grabs the line and either works as a preventer, or slows the boom’s speed while jibing. The brake is actuated by either tensioning the line upon which it rides or using a second line to tension the brake relative to the main line. References[edit]Mainsheet magazine, Vol
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Bowsprit
The bowsprit of a sailing vessel is a spar extending forward from the vessel's prow. It provides an anchor point for the forestay(s), allowing the fore-mast to be stepped farther forward on the hull.[1]Contents1 Origin 2 Small ships 3 Tall ships 4 Hang gliders 5 ReferencesOrigin[edit]The bowsprit of the Dar Pomorza
Dar Pomorza
carries a trapeze of safety nettingThe word bowsprit is thought to originate from the Middle Low German word bōchsprēt - bōch meaning bow and sprēt meaning pole.[2] Early ocean-going vessels tended to tilt the bowsprit, also known in centuries past as a boltsprit, at a high angle, and hung one or two square spritsails from yards. In the 17th century and early 18th century a vertical sprit topmast was added near the end of the bowsprit and another square sail added to it; this was not a particularly successful design however, the mast tending to carry away in heavy weather
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Capstan (nautical)
A capstan is a vertical-axled rotating machine developed for use on sailing ships to multiply the pulling force of seamen when hauling ropes, cables, and hawsers. The principle is similar to that of the windlass, which has a horizontal axle.Contents1 History1.1 Early form 1.2 Later form 1.3 Modern form2 Similar machines 3 Use on land 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The word, connected with the Old French
Old French
capestan or cabestan(t), from Old Provençal cabestan, from capestre "pulley cord," from Latin capistrum, -a halter, from capere, to take hold of, seems to have come into English (14th century) from Portuguese or Spanish shipmen at the time of the Crusades.[1] Both device and word are considered Spanish inventions.[2] Early form[edit]A capstan on a sailing ship
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Cathead
A cathead is a large wooden beam located on either side of the bow of a sailing ship, and angled forward at roughly 45 degrees. The beam is used to support the ship's anchor when raising it (weighing anchor) or lowering it (letting go), and for carrying the anchor on its stock-end when suspended outside the ship's side. It is furnished with sheaves at the outer end, and the inner end (which is called the cat's-tail) fits down on the cat-beam. The cat stopper also fastens the anchor on. The purpose of the cathead is to provide both a heavy enough beam to support the massive weight of the anchor, and to hold the metal anchor away from the wooden side of the ship to prevent damage. In common practice, the projecting end of the beam was carved to resemble the face of a lion or cat
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Centreboard
A centreboard or centerboard (US) is a retractable keel which pivots out of a slot in the hull of a sailboat, known as a centreboard trunk (UK) or centerboard case (US). The retractability allows the centreboard to be raised to operate in shallow waters, to move the centre of lateral resistance (offsetting changes to the sailplan that move the centre of effort aft), to reduce drag when the full area of the centreboard is not needed, or when removing the boat from the water, as when trailering. A centreboard which consists of just a pivoting metal plate is called a centerplate. A daggerboard is similar but slides vertically rather than pivoting. The analog in a scow is a bilgeboard: these are fitted in pairs and used one at a time. Lt. John Schank
John Schank
(c. 1740 – 6 February 1823) was an officer of the British Royal Navy and is credited with the invention of the centerboard
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Chains (nautical)
The chains were small platforms, built on either side of the hull of a ship, used to provide a wide purchase for the shrouds, and to assist in the practice of depth sounding. The chains provided a platform for a 'leadsman', the sailor assigned to swing the sounding line, or 'lead' into the water.[1] The term originated from the practice of the sailor standing between the shrouds when casting the line, which were attached to the hull by chainplates, or, in earlier sailing ships, to lengths of chain along the ship's side. A length of chain was usually fixed at waist height to the stanchions above the chains, as an added safety measure.[1] The chains were common on large sailing vessels, but the role of leadsman and swinging the lead to obtain depth soundings declined with developments in echo sounding, and ships are rarely now equipped with chains.[1] Notes[edit]^ a b c Kemp (ed.). The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea. p. 150. References[edit]Peter Kemp, ed. (1976)
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Crow's Nest
A crow's nest is a structure in the upper part of the main mast of a ship or a structure that is used as a lookout point. This position ensured the best view for lookouts to spot approaching hazards, other ships, or land. It was the best device for this purpose until the invention of radar. In the early 19th century, it was simply a barrel or a basket lashed to the tallest mast. Later, it became a specially designed platform with protective railing. The barrel crow's nest was invented in 1807 by the Arctic explorer William Scoresby, Sr.[1] A statue in Whitby, North Yorkshire commemorates the event.[citation needed] It should not be confused with the top, the platform in the upper part of each lower mast of a square-rigged sailing ship. The first recorded appearance of the term was in 1807, used to describe William Scoresby's barrel crows nest platform
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Longship
Longships were a type of ship invented and used by the Norsemen (commonly known as the Vikings) for commerce, exploration, and warfare during the Viking Age. The longship's design evolved over many centuries, beginning in the Stone Age with the invention of the umiak and continuing up until the 6th century with clinker-built ships like Nydam and Kvalsund. The longship appeared in its complete form between the 9th and 13th centuries. The character and appearance of these ships have been reflected in Scandinavian boat-building traditions until today
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Daggerboard
A daggerboard is a retractable centreboard used by various sailing craft. While other types of centreboard may pivot to retract, a daggerboard slides in a casing. The shape of the daggerboard converts the forward motion into a windward lift, countering the leeward push of the sail. The theoretical centre of lateral resistance is on the trailing edge of the daggerboard.Contents1 General1.1 Purpose 1.2 How it works 1.3 History2 Boats with daggerboards 3 References 4 External linksGeneral[edit] A daggerboard is a removable vertical keel that is inserted through a "trunk" in the center of a vessel's hull, usually amidships. Daggerboards are usually found in small sailing craft such as day sailers, which are easily handled by a single person. Daggerboards are not usually ballasted but are locked in place by a clip or pin
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Deck (ship)
A deck is a permanent covering over a compartment or a hull[1] of a ship. On a boat or ship, the primary or upper deck is the horizontal structure that forms the "roof" of the hull, strengthening it and serving as the primary working surface. Vessels often have more than one level both within the hull and in the superstructure above the primary deck, similar to the floors of a multi-story building, that are also referred to as decks, as are certain compartments and decks built over specific areas of the superstructure. Decks for some purposes have specific names.Contents1 Structure 2 Common names for decks 3 Construction3.1 Methods in wood 3.2 Methods in metal 3.3 Methods in fiberglass 3.4 Rules of thumb to determine the deck scantlings4 Notes 5 External linksStructure[edit] The main purpose of the upper or primary deck is structural, and only secondarily to provide weather-tightness and support people and equipment
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