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Standard Time Act
The Standard Time Act
Standard Time Act
of 1918, also known as the Calder Act, was the first United States
United States
federal law implementing Standard time and Daylight saving time in the United States.[2] It authorized the Interstate Commerce Commission
Interstate Commerce Commission
to define each time zone. The section concerning daylight saving time was repealed by the act titled An Act For the repeal of the daylight-saving law, Pub.L. 66–40, 41 Stat. 280, enacted August 20, 1919, over President Woodrow Wilson's veto. Section 264 of the act mistakenly placed most of the state of Idaho (south of Salmon River (Idaho)) in UTC−06:00 CST Central Standard Time, but was amended in 2007 by Congress to UTC−07:00 MST Mountain Standard Time.[3] MST was observed prior to the correction. References[edit]^ The Uniform Time Act
Uniform Time Act
of 1966. Pub.L
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Interstate Commerce Commission
The Interstate Commerce Commission
Interstate Commerce Commission
(ICC) was a regulatory agency in the United States created by the Interstate Commerce Act of 1887. The agency's original purpose was to regulate railroads (and later trucking) to ensure fair rates, to eliminate rate discrimination, and to regulate other aspects of common carriers, including interstate bus lines and telephone companies. Congress expanded ICC authority to regulate other modes of commerce beginning in 1906. The agency was abolished in 1995, and its remaining functions were transferred to the Surface Transportation Board. The Commission's five members were appointed by the President with the consent of the United States Senate
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Law Of The United States
The law of the United States
United States
comprises many levels[1] of codified and uncodified forms of law, of which the most important is the United States Constitution, the foundation of the federal government of the United States. The Constitution sets out the boundaries of federal law, which consists of acts of Congress,[2] treaties ratified by the Senate,[3] regulations promulgated by the executive branch,[4] and case law originating from the federal judiciary.[5] The United States Code is the official compilation and codification of general and permanent federal statutory law. Federal law and treaties, so long as they are in accordance with the Constitution, preempt conflicting state and territorial laws in the 50 U.S. states and in the territories.[6] However, the scope of federal preemption is limited because the scope of federal power is not universal
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Mountain Standard Time
The Mountain Time Zone
Mountain Time Zone
of North America
North America
keeps time by subtracting seven hours from Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC) when standard time is in effect, and by subtracting six hours during daylight saving time (UTC−6). The clock time in this zone is based on the mean solar time at the 105th meridian west
105th meridian west
of the Greenwich Observatory. In the United States, the exact specification for the location of time zones and the dividing lines between zones is set forth in the Code of Federal Regulations at 49 CFR 71.[a] cor In the United States
United States
and Canada, this time zone is generically called Mountain Time (MT)
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UTC−07
UTC−07:00 is a time offset that subtracts 7 hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). In North America, it is observed in the Mountain Time Zone during standard time, and in the Pacific Time Zone
Pacific Time Zone
during the other 8 months (see Daylight saving time). A few places use it year-round.Contents1 As standard time (Northern Hemisphere winter)1.1 North America2 As daylight saving time (Northern Hemisphere summer)2.1 North America3 As standard time (all year round)3.1 North AmericaAs standard time (Northern Hemisphere winter)[edit] Principal cities: Calgary, Denver North America[edit] Canada
Canada
- Mountain Time
Mountain Time
ZoneAlberta British Columbia
British Columbia
(Creston, Cranbrook and Fort St
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Central Standard Time
The North American Central Time Zone
Central Time Zone
(CT) is a time zone in parts of Canada, the United States, Mexico, Central America, some Caribbean Islands, and part of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Central Standard Time (CST) is six hours behind Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)
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UTC−06
UTC−06:00 is a time offset that subtracts six hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). In North America, it is observed in the Central Time Zone during standard time, and in the Mountain Time
Mountain Time
Zone during the other eight months (see Daylight saving time)
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Salmon River (Idaho)
The Salmon River is located in Idaho
Idaho
in the northwestern United States. The Salmon is also known as The River of No Return. It flows for 425 miles (684 km) through central Idaho, draining a rugged, thinly populated watershed of 14,000 square miles (36,260 km2) and dropping more than 7,000 feet (2,130 m) between its headwaters, near Galena Summit
Galena Summit
above the Sawtooth Valley
Sawtooth Valley
in the Sawtooth National Recreation Area, and its confluence with the Snake River. Measured at White Bird, its average discharge is 11,060 cubic feet (310 m3) per second.[5] It is one of the largest rivers in the continental United States
United States
without a single dam on its mainstem.[6] Cities located along the Salmon River include Stanley, Clayton, Challis, Salmon, Riggins, and White Bird
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Idaho
Idaho
Idaho
(/ˈaɪdəhoʊ/ ( listen)) is a state in the northwestern region of the United States. It borders the state of Montana
Montana
to the east and northeast, Wyoming
Wyoming
to the east, Nevada
Nevada
and Utah
Utah
to the south, and Washington and Oregon
Oregon
to the west. To the north, it shares a small portion of the Canadian border with the province of British Columbia. With a population of around 1.6 million and an area of 83,569 square miles (216,440 km2), Idaho
Idaho
is the 14th largest, the 12th least populous and the 7th least densely populated of the 50 U.S. states. The state's capital and largest city is Boise. Idaho
Idaho
prior to European settlement was inhabited by Native American peoples, some of whom still live in the area
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America Flag Coat of arms Motto: "In God
God
We Trust"[1][a] .mw-parser-outpu
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Woodrow Wilson
President of the United StatesPresidencyFirst Term1912 campaignElection1st InaugurationWomen's suffrage Suffrage
Suffrage
paradeThe New Freedom Silent Sentinels Federal Reserve Act Clayton Antitrust
A

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New York (state)
New York is a state in the Northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.54 million residents in 2018,[6] it is the fourth most populous state. In order to distinguish the state from the city with the same name, it is sometimes referred to as New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City, makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.[9] The state and city were both named for the 17th century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
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Republican Party (United States)
The Republican Party, commonly referred to as the GOP (abbreviation for Grand Old Party), is one of the two major political parties in the United States, the other being its historic rival, the Democratic Party. The party is named after republicanism, the dominant value during the American Revolution. Founded by anti-slavery activists, economic modernizers, ex Whigs and ex Free Soilers in 1854, the Republicans dominated politics nationally and in the majority of northern states for most of the period between 1860 and 1932.[16] The Republican Party originally championed classical liberal ideas, including anti-slavery and economic reforms.[17][18] The party was usually dominant over the Democrats during the Third Party System
Third Party System
and Fourth Party System. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
formed the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party after being rejected by the GOP and ran as a candidate
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William M. Calder
William Musgrave Calder I (March 3, 1869 – March 3, 1945) was an American politician from New York.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] He was born in Brooklyn
Brooklyn
on March 3, 1869 to Susan (Ryan) Calder and Alexander G. Calder, a carpenter and building contractor.[2] He trained as a carpenter, attended night classes at Cooper Union, and went into business as a building contractor. In 1893 he married Catherine E. Harloe. His children were Elsie Calder who married to Rear Admiral
Rear Admiral
Robert C. Lee; and William M. Calder
William M. Calder
II. He served as the Borough of Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Building Commissioner from 1902 to 1903. He represented New York as a Republican in the United States House of Representatives from 1905 until 1915. In 1914, he lost the Republican primary for U.S. Senator
U.S

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Title 15 Of The United States Code
Title 15 of the United States Code
United States Code
outlines the role of commerce and trade in the United States Code.[1] Notable legislation in the title includes the Federal Trade Commission Act, the Clayton Antitrust Act, the Sherman Antitrust Act, the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Consumer Product Safety Act, and the CAN-SPAM Act of 2003.15 U.S.C. ch. 1—Monopolies and Combinations in Restraint of Trade 15 U.S.C. ch. 2—Federal Trade Commission; Promotion Of Export Trade And Prevention Of Unfair Methods uk Competition 15 U.S.C. ch. 2a—Securities And Trust Indentures 15 U.S.C. ch. 2b—Securities Exchanges 15 U.S.C. ch. 2b-1—Securities Investor Protection 15 U.S.C. ch. 2c—Public Utility Holding Companies 15 U.S.C. ch. 2d—Investment Companies And Advisers 15 U.S.C. ch. 2e—Omnibus Small Business Capital Formation 15 U.S.C. ch. 3—Trade-Marks 15 U.S.C. ch. 4—China Trade 15 U.S.C. ch. 5—Statistical and Commercial Information 15 U.S.C
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