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St Donat's Castle
St Donat's Castle
Castle
(Welsh: Castell Sain Dunwyd), St Donats, Wales
Wales
is a medieval castle in the Vale of Glamorgan, about 16 miles (26 km) to the west of Cardiff. Founded in the 12th century, the castle was the home of the Stradling family for some four hundred years. After the death of the last Stradling in a duel, the castle's status and condition declined and by the early 19th century it was only partly habitable. In the 20th century it was restored by a colliery owner and then massively expanded by William Randolph Hearst. With a history of occupation extending from the late-13th century to the present St Donat's is among the oldest continuously inhabited castles in Wales. The present castle's origins date from the 1300s, when Peter de Stradling (or de Stratelinges) developed the castle. The Stradlings remained in ownership until 1738
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Welsh Language
All UK speakers: 700,000+ (2012)[1]Wales: 562,016 speakers (19.0% of the population of Wales),[2] (data from 2011 Census); All skills (speaking, reading, or writing): 630,062 language users[3] England: 110,000–150,000 (estimated) Argentina: 1,500-5,000[4][5](data not from 2011 census) Canada: L1,<3,885,[6] United States: ~2,235 (2009-2013) (2017)Language familyIndo-EuropeanCelticInsular CelticBrittonicWesternWelshEarly formsCommon BrittonicOld WelshMiddle WelshWriting systemLatin (Welsh alphabet) Welsh BrailleOfficial statusOfficial language inWalesRecognised minority language in United Kingdom
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English Civil War
Parliamentarian victoryExecution of King Charles I Exile of Charles II Establishment of the republican Commonwealth under Oliver CromwellBelligerentsEnglish, Scottish, Welsh and Irish Royalists English, Scottish, Welsh and Irish ParliamentariansCommanders and leadersKing Charles I   Prince Rupert
Prince Rupert
of the Rhine Charles IIEarl of Essex Thomas Fairfax Oliver CromwellCasualties and losses50,000[1] 34,000[1]127,000 noncombat deaths (including some 40,000 civilians)[a]v t eEnglish Civil WarFirst Second ThirdThe English Civil War
English Civil War
(1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's government
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Battle Of Agincourt
The Battle of Agincourt
Battle of Agincourt
(/ˈæʒɪnkʊr/; in French, Azincourt; French pronunciation: ​[azɛ̃kuʁ])[a] was a major English victory in the Hundred Years' War. The battle took place on 25 October 1415 (Saint Crispin's Day) in the County of Saint-Pol, Artois, some 40 km south of Calais
Calais
(now Azincourt
Azincourt
in northern France).[6][b] Along with the battles of Crécy (1346) and Poitiers (1356), it was one of the most important English triumphs in the conflict
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Edward III
Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was King of England and Lord of Ireland
Lord of Ireland
from 25 January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous and unorthodox reign of his father, Edward II. Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe. His long reign of 50 years was the second longest in medieval England and saw vital developments in legislation and government—in particular the evolution of the English parliament—as well as the ravages of the Black Death. Edward was crowned at age fourteen after his father was deposed by his mother, Isabella of France, and her lover Roger Mortimer. At age seventeen he led a successful coup against Mortimer, the de facto ruler of the country, and began his personal reign
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Bristol Channel
The Bristol
Bristol
Channel (Welsh: Môr Hafren) is a major inlet in the island of Great Britain, separating South Wales
South Wales
from Devon
Devon
and Somerset
Somerset
in South West England. It extends from the lower estuary of the River Severn
River Severn
(Welsh: Afon Hafren) to the North Atlantic Ocean
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Taliesin Williams
Taliesin Williams (bardic name Taliesin ab Iolo or Ab Iolo; 9 July 1787 – 16 February 1847) was a Welsh poet and author, and son of notable literary forger Iolo Morganwg.[1] He was born in Cardiff, went to school in Cowbridge, and became an assistant teacher at a boarding school run by Reverend David Davies in Neath. He gradually took over leading the proceedings of regional Gorseddau from 1814, when he was awarded the title of Druid. He worked as a stonemason with his father in 1815. In 1816 he opened a school in Merthyr Tydfil, where he worked as a schoolmaster until the end of his life. He assisted with the publication of his father's work Cyfrinach Beirdd Ynys Prydain ("Mystery of the bards of the island of Britain") in 1829. In 1834 he won the bardic chair at the Cardiff
Cardiff
Eisteddfod with an awdl entitled Y Derwyddon (The Druids)
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Bretons
The Bretons
Bretons
(Breton: Bretoned, Breton pronunciation: [breˈtɔ̃nɛt]) are an ethnic group located in the region of Brittany
Brittany
in France. They trace much of their heritage to groups of Brittonic speakers who immigrated from southwestern Great Britain, particularly Cornwall
Cornwall
and Devon, to expand their territory onto the continent. They also descend in some parts from Vikings. They migrated in waves from the 3rd to 9th century (most heavily from 450–600) into Armorica, which was subsequently named Brittany
Brittany
after them.[7] The main traditional language of Brittany
Brittany
is Breton (Brezhoneg), spoken in Lower Brittany
Brittany
(i.e
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Mallt-y-Nos
Mallt-y-Nos (Matilda of the Night), also known as the Night Mallt,[1] is a crone in Welsh mythology
Welsh mythology
who rides with Arawn and the hounds (Cŵn Annwn) of the Wild Hunt, chasing sorrowful, lost souls to Annwn. The
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Edward Stradling (1528/29–1609)
Sir Edward Stradling (c.1529–1609) was an English politician, antiquary and literary patron.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Legacy 4 NotesLife[edit] The eldest son of Sir Thomas Stradling, he studied at the University of Oxford, but left without graduating, and travelled on the continent, spending some time at Rome. With an old family connection with the Arundels, he was elected in April 1554 Member of Parliament for Steyning, and in 1557–8 for Arundel. He succeeded to the estates in 1573, was knighted in 1575, was sheriff of Glamorganshire for 1573, 1581, and 1593, and was appointed in 1578 one of the county commissioners for the suppression of piracy
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Twelve Knights Of Glamorgan
The Twelve Knights of Glamorgan
Glamorgan
were a legendary group followers of Robert Fitzhamon
Robert Fitzhamon
(d.1107), the Norman conqueror of Glamorgan. Although Fitzhamon was an actual historical figure, 16th century historians, in particular Sir Edward Stradling, built upon the legend of a group of knights who ruled over the county in his stead. The fact that many of the knights existed during the period gave the legend credence.Contents1 Background 2 List of the Twelve Knights 3 References 4 External linksBackground[edit] The legend of the Twelve Knights of Glamorgan
Glamorgan
was founded by the antiquarian Sir Edward Stradling (d. 1609) of St. Donat's Castle
St

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Siôn Dafydd Rhys
Siôn Dafydd Rhys, in Latin
Latin
Joannes David Rhaesus, also called John David Rhys, or John Davies (1534 – c. 1609), was a Welsh physician and grammarian. He wrote the first Welsh grammar in Latin
Latin
(the first Welsh grammar in Latin, but not the first Welsh grammar at all, compare Gruffydd Robert), published in 1592.Contents1 Life 2 Writings 3 Publications 4 Notes 5 SourcesLife[edit] Siôn Dafydd Rhys
Siôn Dafydd Rhys
was born in 1534 in Llanfaethlu, Anglesey.[1] His family had modest means but traced its origins from uchelwyr, or minor nobility.[2] The family legend was that his father, Dafydd Rhys, was son of Rhys Llwyd Brydydd of Glamorganshire. Dafydd Rhys came to Anglesey as gardener to Sir William Gruffydd of Penrhyn, who married Jane Stradling of St Donats, Glamorganshire. Dafydd married one of the bride's attendants
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Cavalier
The term Cavalier
Cavalier
(/ˌkævəˈlɪər/) was first used by Roundheads as a term of abuse for the wealthier Royalist supporters of King Charles I and his son Charles II of England
Charles II of England
during the English Civil War, the Interregnum, and the Restoration (1642 – c. 1679). It was later adopted by the Royalists themselves. Although it referred originally to political and social attitudes and behaviour, of which clothing was a very small part, it has subsequently become strongly identified with the fashionable clothing of the court at the time
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Charles I Of England
Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649)[a] was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. Charles was born into the House of Stuart
House of Stuart
as the second son of King James VI
James VI
of Scotland, but after his father inherited the English throne in 1603, he moved to England, where he spent much of the rest of his life. He became heir apparent to the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland on the death of his elder brother, Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales, in 1612. An unsuccessful and unpopular attempt to marry him to the Spanish Habsburg
Spanish Habsburg
princess Maria Anna culminated in an eight-month visit to Spain in 1623 that demonstrated the futility of the marriage negotiations
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J. M. W. Turner
Joseph Mallord William Turner RA (23 April 1775 – 19 December 1851), known as J. M. W. Turner
J. M. W. Turner
and contemporarily as William Turner,[a] was an English Romantic painter, printmaker and watercolourist, known for his expressive colourisation, imaginative landscapes and turbulent, often violent marine paintings. Turner was born in Maiden Lane, Covent Garden, London, to a modest lower middle-class family. He lived in London
London
all his life, retaining his Cockney accent
Cockney accent
and assiduously avoiding the trappings of success and fame. A child prodigy, Turner studied at the Royal Academy
Royal Academy
of Arts from 1789, enrolling when he was 14, and exhibited his first work there at 21. During this period, he also served as an architectural draftsman
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