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St. Ann's College
St Ann's College is a co-residential college in North Adelaide, South Australia. In its early decades, the college had only female boarders. Today it houses 185 tertiary students, both sexes, in single rooms; rooms in the new buildings have ensuites and all rooms have airconditioning. Residents at St Ann's College have a diverse background with most coming from either rural Australia or overseas.[2] Members of the College attend three universities in South Australia, University of Adelaide, the University of South Australia and Flinders University. St Ann's College is privately owned and run, and is not funded by government, church or university. The current Principal of the College is Dr
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St Ann's College
St Ann's College is a co-residential college in North Adelaide, South Australia. In its early decades, the college had only female boarders. Today it houses 185 tertiary students, both sexes, in single rooms; rooms in the new buildings have ensuites and all rooms have airconditioning. Residents at St Ann's College have a diverse background with most coming from either rural Australia or overseas.[2] Members of the College attend three universities in South Australia, University of Adelaide, the University of South Australia and Flinders University. St Ann's College is privately owned and run, and is not funded by government, church or university. The current Principal of the College is Dr
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President
The president is a common title for the head of state in most republics. In politics, president is a title given to leaders of republican states. The functions exercised by a president vary according to the form of government. In parliamentary and semi-presidential republics, they are limited to those of the head of state, and are thus largely ceremonial. In presidential republics, the role of the president is more prominent, encompassing also (in most cases) the functions of the head of government
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Table Tennis
Table tennis, also known as ping pong, is a sport in which two or four players hit a lightweight ball back and forth across a table using small bats. The game takes place on a hard table divided by a net. Except for the initial serve, the rules are generally as follows: players must allow a ball played toward them to bounce one time on their side of the table, and must return it so that it bounces on the opposite side at least once. A point is scored when a player fails to return the ball within the rules. Play is fast and demands quick reactions. Spinning the ball alters its trajectory and limits an opponent's options, giving the hitter a great advantage. Table tennis
Table tennis
is governed by the worldwide organization International Table Tennis
Tennis
Federation (ITTF), founded in 1926
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Hockey
Hockey
Hockey
is a sport in which two teams play against each other by trying to maneuver a ball or a puck into the opponent's goal using a hockey stick
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Volleyball
Volleyball
Volleyball
is a team sport in which two teams of six players are separated by a net. Each team tries to score points by grounding a ball on the other team's court under organized rules.[1] It has been a part of the official program of the Summer Olympic Games
Olympic Games
since 1964. The complete rules are extensive, but simply, play proceeds as follows: a player on one of the teams begins a 'rally' by serving the ball (tossing or releasing it and then hitting it with a hand or arm), from behind the back boundary line of the court, over the net, and into the receiving team's court. The receiving team must not let the ball be grounded within their court. The team may touch the ball up to 3 times but individual players may not touch the ball twice consecutively
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Athletics (track And Field)
Track and field
Track and field
is a sport which includes athletic contests established on the skills of running, jumping, and throwing.[1] The name is derived from the sport's typical venue: a stadium with an oval running track enclosing a grass field where the throwing and jumping events take place. Track and field
Track and field
is categorized under the umbrella sport of athletics, which also includes road running, cross country running, and race walking. The foot racing events, which include sprints, middle- and long-distance events, race walking and hurdling, are won by the athlete with the fastest time. The jumping and throwing events are won by the athlete who achieves the greatest distance or height. Regular jumping events include long jump, triple jump, high jump and pole vault, while the most common throwing events are shot put, javelin, discus and hammer
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Social
Living organisms including humans are social when they live collectively in interacting populations, whether they are aware of it, and whether the interaction is voluntary or involuntary.Contents1 Etymology 2 Definition 3 Social
Social
theorists 4 In socialism 5 Modern uses 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The word "Social" derives from the Latin word socii ("allies")
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Sport
Sport
Sport
(British English) or sports (American English) includes all forms of competitive physical activity or games which,[1] through casual or organised participation, aim to use, maintain or improve physical ability and skills while providing enjoyment to participants, and in some cases, entertainment for spectators.[2] Usually the contest or game is between two sides, each attempting to exceed the other. Some sports allow a tie game; others provide tie-breaking methods, to ensure one winner and one loser. A number of such two-sided contests may be arranged in a tournament producing a champion. Many sports leagues make an annual champion by arranging games in a regular sports season, followed in some cases by playoffs. Hundreds of sports exist, from those between single contestants, through to those with hundreds of simultaneous participants, either in teams or competing as individuals
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Vice-president
A vice president (in British English: vice-president for governments and director for businesses) is an officer in government or business who is below a president (managing director) in rank. It can also refer to executive vice presidents, signifying that the VP is on the executive branch of the government, university or company. The name comes from the Latin
Latin
vice meaning "in place of".[1] In some countries, the vice president is called the deputy president. In everyday speech, the abbreviation VP can be used.Contents1 In government 2 In business2.1 Hierarchy of vice presidents 2.2 Expanded use3 Usage in other organizations 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksIn government[edit] See also: List of current vice presidents In government, a vice president is a person whose primary responsibility is to act in place of the president on the event of the president's death, resignation or incapacity
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Netball
Netball
Netball
is a ball sport played by two teams of seven players. Its development, derived from early versions of basketball, began in England
England
in the 1890s. By 1960, international playing rules had been standardised for the game, and the International Federation of Netball and Women's Basketball
Basketball
(later renamed the International Netball Federation (INF)) was formed. As of 2011, the INF comprises more than 60 national teams organized into five global regions. Games are played on a rectangular court with raised goal rings at each end. Each team attempts to score goals by passing a ball down the court and shooting it through its goal ring. Players are assigned specific positions, which define their roles within the team and restrict their movement to certain areas of the court
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Treasurer
A treasurer is the person responsible for running the treasury of an organization. The adjective for a treasurer is normally "tresorial." The adjective "treasurial" normally means pertaining to a treasury, rather than the treasurer. The significant core functions of a corporate treasurer include cash and liquidity management, risk management, and corporate finance.[1]Contents1 Government 2 In the Inns of Court 3 Volunteer organizations 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksGovernment[edit] The Treasury
Treasury
of a country is the department responsible for the country's economy, finance and revenue. The Treasurer
Treasurer
is generally the head of the Treasury, although, in some countries (such as the U.K. or the U.S.) the treasurer reports to a Secretary of the Treasury, or Chancellor of the Exchequer
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Secretary
A secretary or personal assistant is a person whose work consists of supporting management, including executives, using a variety of project management, communication, or organizational skills. These functions may be entirely carried out to assist one other employee or may be for the benefit of more than one. In other situations a secretary is an officer of a society or organization who deals with correspondence, admits new members, and organizes official meetings and events.[1][2][3]Contents1 Duties and functions 2 Etymology 3 Origin 4 Modern developments 5 Contemporary employment 6 Training by country6.1 Belgium 6.2 United States7 Executive assistant7.1 Civilian 7.2 Military8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksDuties and functions[edit]This section possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed
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Tutor
A tutor is an instructor who gives private lessons. Shadow education is a name for private supplementary tutoring that is offered outside the mainstream education system. Typically, a tutor provides academic assistance to one or more students on certain subject areas
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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