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Squatter
Squatting
Squatting
is the action of occupying an abandoned or unoccupied area of land or a building, usually residential,[1] that the squatter does not own, rent or otherwise have lawful permission to use. Author Robert Neuwirth
Robert Neuwirth
suggested in 2004 that there were one billion squatters globally
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Dual Power
"Dual Power" (Russian: Двоевластие, tr. Dvoyevlastiye) was a term first used by Vladimir Lenin,[1][2][3] although conceptually first outlined by Pierre-Joseph Proudhon,[4] which described a situation in the wake of the February Revolution
February Revolution
in which two powers, the workers councils (or Soviets, particularly the Petrograd Soviet) and the official state apparatus of the Provisional Government coexisted with each other and competed for legitimacy. Lenin argued that this essentially unstable situation constituted a unique opportunity for the Soviets to seize power by smashing the Provisional Government and establishing themselves as the basis of a new form of state power
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Antimilitarism
Antimilitarism
Antimilitarism
(also spelt anti-militarism) is a doctrine that opposes war, relying heavily on a critical theory of imperialism and was an explicit goal of the First and Second International. Whereas pacifism is the doctrine that disputes (especially between countries) should be settled without recourse to violence, Paul B
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Social Anarchism
Social anarchism
Social anarchism
(sometimes referred to as socialist anarchism or anarcho-socialism)[1] is a non-state form of socialism[2] and is considered to be the branch of anarchism that sees individual freedom as being dependent upon mutual aid.[3] Social anarchist thought emphasizes community and social equality as complementary to autonomy and personal freedom.[3] They also advocate the conversion of present-day private property into social property or the commons, while retaining respect for personal property.[4] The term is used to describe those who—contra anarchist individualism—place
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Anarcho-syndicalism
Anarcho-syndicalism
Anarcho-syndicalism
(also referred to as revolutionary syndicalism)[1] is a theory of anarchism that views revolutionary industrial unionism or syndicalism as a method for workers in capitalist society to gain control of an economy and, with that control, influence broader society. Syndicalists consider their economic theories a strategy for facilitating worker self-activity and as an alternative co-operative economic system with democratic values and production centered on meeting human needs. The basic principles of anarcho-syndicalism are solidarity, direct action (action undertaken without the intervention of third parties such as politicians, bureaucrats, and arbitrators) and direct democracy, or workers' self-management
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Synthesis Anarchism
Synthesis anarchism, synthesist anarchism, synthesism or synthesis federations is a form of anarchist organization which tries to join anarchists of different tendencies under the principles of anarchism without adjectives.[1] In the 1920s this form found as its main proponents the anarcho-communists Voline
Voline
and Sébastien Faure, bringing together anarchists of three main tendencies: individualist anarchism, communist anarchism, and anarcho-syndicalism.[1][2] It is the main principle behind the anarchist federations grouped around the contemporary global International of
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Veganarchism
The anarchist philosophical and political movement has some connections to elements of the animal liberation movement. Many anarchists are vegetarian or vegan (or veganarchists) and have played a role in combating perceived injustices against animals. They usually describe the struggle for the liberation of non-human animals as a natural outgrowth of the struggle for human freedom.[2]Contents1 Origins1.1 Veganism
Veganism
and anarchism2 Direct action 3 Convictions 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOrigins[edit] Leo Tolstoy
Leo Tolstoy
(1828–1910) was a vegetarian, pacifist and Christian anarchist. In On Civil Disobedience he wrote: "A man can live and be healthy without killing animals for food; therefore, if he eats meat, he participates in taking animal life merely for the sake of his appetite
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Anarchism Without Adjectives
Anarchism
Anarchism
without adjectives (from the Spanish "anarquismo sin adjetivos"), in the words of historian George Richard Esenwein, "referred to an unhyphenated form of anarchism, that is, a doctrine without any qualifying labels such as communist, collectivist, mutualist, or individualist. For others, ..
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Anarchy
Anarchy
Anarchy
is the condition of a society, entity, group of people, or a single person that rejects hierarchy.[1][2] Colloquially, it can also refer to a society experiencing widespread turmoil and collapse. The word originally meant leaderlessness, but in 1840 Pierre-Joseph Proudhon adopted the term in his treatise What Is Property? to refer to a new political philosophy: anarchism, which advocates stateless societies based on voluntary associations. In practical terms, anarchy can refer to the curtailment or abolition of traditional forms of government and institutions
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Anarchist Black Cross
The Anarchist Black Cross
Anarchist Black Cross
(ABC, formerly the Anarchist Red Cross) is an anarchist support organization. The group is notable for its efforts at providing prisoners with political literature, but it also organizes material and legal support for class struggle prisoners worldwide
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Anationalism
Anationalism
Anationalism
(Esperanto: sennaciismo) is a term originating from the community of Esperanto
Esperanto
speakers
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Anti-authoritarianism
Anti-authoritarianism
Anti-authoritarianism
is opposition to authoritarianism, which is defined as "a form of social organisation characterised by submission to authority",[1] "favoring complete obedience or subjection to authority as opposed to individual freedom"[2] and to authoritarian government.[3] Anti-authoritarians usually believe in full equality before the law and strong civil liberties
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Affinity Group
An affinity group is a group formed around a shared interest or common goal, to which individuals formally or informally belong. Affinity groups are generally precluded from being under the aegis of any governmental agency, and their purposes must be primarily non-commercial. Examples of affinity groups include private social clubs, fraternities, writing or reading circles, hobby clubs, and groups engaged in political activism. Some affinity groups are organized in a non-hierarchical manner, often using consensus decision making, and are frequently made up of trusted friends. They provide a method of organization that is flexible and decentralized
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Anarcho-primitivism
Anarcho-primitivism
Anarcho-primitivism
is an anarchist critique of the origins and progress of civilization. According to anarcho-primitivism, the shift from hunter-gatherer to agricultural subsistence gave rise to social stratification, coercion, alienation, and overpopulation. Anarcho-primitivists advocate a return of non-"civilized" ways of life through deindustrialization, abolition of the division of labor or specialization, and abandonment of large-scale organization technologies. Many traditional anarchists reject the critique of civilization while some, such as Wolfi Landstreicher, endorse the critique but do not consider themselves anarcho-primitivists
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Classless Society
Classless society
Classless society
refers to a society in which no one is born into a social class. Such distinctions of wealth, income, education, culture, or social network might arise and would only be determined by individual experience and achievement in such a society. Codere defines social class as a segment of the community, the members of which show a common social position in a hierarchical ranking.[1] Codere suggest that a true class-organized society is one in which the hierarchy of prestige and status is divisible into groups each with its own social, economic, attitudinal and cultural characteristics and each having differential degrees of power in community decision.[1] However class organised societies rarely follow this structure, suggesting that a classless society might be better. Since determination of life outcome by birth class has proved historically difficult to avoid, advocates, such as anarchists, communists, etc
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Class Conflict
Class conflict, frequently referred to as class warfare or class struggle, is the tension or antagonism which exists in society due to competing socioeconomic interests and desires between people of different classes. The view that the class struggle provides the lever for radical social change for the majority is central to the work of communist Karl Marx
Karl Marx
and the anarchist Mikhail Bakunin. Class conflict
Class conflict
can take many different forms: direct violence, such as wars fought for resources and cheap labor; indirect violence, such as deaths from poverty, starvation, illness or unsafe working conditions; coercion, such as the threat of losing a job or the pulling of an important investment; or ideologically, such as with books and articles
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