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Spurius Lucretius Tricipitinus
Spurius Lucretius Tricipitinus is a semi-legendary figure in early Roman history. He was the first Suffect Consul
Suffect Consul
of Rome and was also the father of Lucretia, whose rape by Sextus Tarquinius, followed by her suicide, resulted in the dethronement of King Lucius Tarquinius Superbus, therefore directly precipitating the founding of the Roman Republic. It is believed that Lucretius and his accomplishments are at least partly mythical and most ancient references to him were penned by Livy
Livy
and Plutarch.Contents1 Founding of the Republic 2 Early Republic 3 Suffect-Consulship 4 See also 5 ReferencesFounding of the Republic[edit] Main article: Overthrow of the Roman monarchy While the king of Rome was away at the siege of Ardea, his son, Sextus Tarquinius, raped Lucretia, the wife of the king's nephew. Sextus returned to camp
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Suffect Consul
A consul held the highest elected political office of the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), and ancient Romans considered the consulship the highest level of the cursus honorum (an ascending sequence of public offices to which politicians aspired). Each year, the citizens of Rome elected two consuls to serve jointly for a one-year term. The consuls alternated in holding imperium each month, and a consul's imperium extended over Rome, Italy, and the provinces
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Oath Of Vengeance
Oath of Vengeance is a 1944 American western film directed by Sam Newfield. Shot at Corriganville Movie Ranch, the film was released by Producers Releasing Corporation as one of the studio's Billy the Kid film series.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Quotes 4 External linksPlot[edit] Fuzzy decides to give up the cowboy life after a calf he unsuccessfully hogtied gets her revenge by dragging Fuzzy through the prairie by his own lasso. Fuzzy purchases a general store figuring by buying things low and selling things at a higher price he'll be rich. Sadly Fuzzy's dreams come to a long pause when he discovers all his customers purchase their goods by credit, paying them back when their harvests or cattle sales come through. Adding to Fuzzy's woes are the fact that he shares his store with an angry postmistress. Meanwhile two villains see their chance to become rich by playing the cattlemen, led by female boss Dale Kirby, and the farmers represented by Dan Harper against each other
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Parallel Lives
Plutarch's Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans, commonly called Parallel Lives
Parallel Lives
or Plutarch's Lives, is a series of biographies of famous men, arranged in tandem to illuminate their common moral virtues or failings, probably written at the beginning of the second century AD.[1] The surviving Parallel Lives
Parallel Lives
(Greek: Βίοι Παράλληλοι, Bíoi Parállēloi) comprises 23 pairs of biographies, each pair consisting of one Greek and one Roman, as well as four unpaired, single lives
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Ab Urbe Condita Libri (Livy)
Livy's History of Rome, sometimes referred to as Ab Urbe Condita,[i] is a monumental history of ancient Rome, written in Latin, between 27 and 9 BC.[ii] by the historian Titus Livius, or "Livy", as he is usually known in English
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Ab Urbe Condita (book)
Livy's History of Rome, sometimes referred to as Ab Urbe Condita,[i] is a monumental history of ancient Rome, written in Latin, between 27 and 9 BC.[ii] by the historian Titus Livius, or "Livy", as he is usually known in English
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Suffect Consul
A consul held the highest elected political office of the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), and ancient Romans considered the consulship the highest level of the cursus honorum (an ascending sequence of public offices to which politicians aspired). Each year, the citizens of Rome elected two consuls to serve jointly for a one-year term. The consuls alternated in holding imperium each month, and a consul's imperium extended over Rome, Italy, and the provinces
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Battle Of Silva Arsia
The Battle of Silva Arsia was a battle in 509 BC between the republican forces of ancient Rome
Rome
and Etruscan forces of Tarquinii
Tarquinii
and Veii
Veii
led by the deposed Roman king Lucius Tarquinius Superbus. The battle took place near the Silva Arsia (the Arsian forest) in Roman territory, and resulted in victory to Rome
Rome
but the death of one of her consuls, Lucius Junius Brutus. The battle was one of a number of attempts by Tarquin to regain the throne, and can also be seen as part of the ongoing conflict between the Etruscan cities and the expanding Roman state. The battle forms part of Rome's early history, which is probably in part legendary.Contents1 Background 2 Battle 3 Aftermath 4 ReferencesBackground[edit] In 509 BC the Roman monarchy was overthrown, and the Roman Republic was established with the election of the first consuls
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Lucretia
According to Roman tradition, Lucretia
Lucretia
(/lʊˈkriːʃə/) or Lucrece (Latin: Lucretia; died c. 510 BC) was a noblewoman in ancient Rome whose rape by Sextus Tarquinius
Sextus Tarquinius
(Tarquin), an Etruscan king's son, was the cause of a rebellion that overthrew the Roman monarchy and led to the transition of Roman government from a kingdom to a republic. There were no contemporary sources; information regarding Lucretia, her rape and suicide, and the consequence of this being the start of the Roman Republic, come from the later accounts of Roman historian Livy
Livy
and Greek-Roman historian Dionysius of Halicarnassus. The incident kindled the flames of dissatisfaction over the tyrannical methods of the last king of Rome, Lucius Tarquinius
Tarquinius
Superbus
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Roman Consul
A consul held the highest elected political office of the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), and ancient Romans considered the consulship the highest level of the cursus honorum (an ascending sequence of public offices to which politicians aspired). Each year, the citizens of Rome
Rome
elected two consuls to serve jointly for a one-year term. The consuls alternated in holding imperium each month, and a consul's imperium extended over Rome, Italy, and the provinces
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Roman Republic
The Roman Republic
Republic
(Latin: Res publica Romana; Classical Latin: [ˈreːs ˈpuːb.lɪ.ka roːˈmaː.na]) was the era of classical Roman civilization beginning with the overthrow of the Roman Kingdom, traditionally dated to 509 BC, and ending in 27 BC with the establishment of the Roman Empire. It was during this period that Rome's control expanded from the city's immediate surroundings to hegemony over the entire Mediterranean
Mediterranean
world. Roman government was headed by two consuls, elected annually by the citizens and advised by a senate composed of appointed magistrates. As Roman society was very hierarchical by modern standards, the evolution of the Roman government was heavily influenced by the struggle between the patricians, Rome's land-holding aristocracy, who traced their ancestry to the founding of Rome, and the plebeians, the far more numerous citizen-commoners
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Ardea, Lazio
Ardea (IPA: /ar'dɛa/ or /'ardea/) is an ancient town and comune in the Metropolitan City of Rome, 35 kilometres (22 miles) south of Rome and about 4 kilometres (2 miles) from today's Mediterranean
Mediterranean
coast. The economy is mostly based on agriculture, although, starting from the 1970s, industry has had an increasingly important role.City gate.Contents1 History 2 Main sights 3 International relations 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksHistory[edit] Ardea is one of the most ancient towns in western Europe, founded during the 8th century BC
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Plutarch
Plutarch
Plutarch
(/ˈpluːtɑːrk/; Greek: Πλούταρχος, Ploútarkhos, Koine Greek: [plǔːtarkʰos]; c. CE 46 – CE 120),[1] later named, upon becoming a Roman citizen, Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus, (Λούκιος Μέστριος Πλούταρχος)[a] was a Greek biographer and essayist, known primarily for his Parallel Lives
Parallel Lives
and Moralia.[2] He is classified[3] as a Middle Platonist
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Livy
Titus Livius Patavinus (Classical Latin: [ˈtɪ.tʊs ˈliː.wi.ʊs]; 64 or 59 BC – AD 12 or 17) – often rendered as Livy
Livy
/ˈlɪvi/ in English language
English language
sources – was a Roman historian. He wrote a monumental history of Rome
Rome
and the Roman people – Ab Urbe Condita Libri (Books from the Foundation of the City) – covering the period from the earliest legends of Rome
Rome
before the traditional foundation in 753 BC through the reign of Augustus
Augustus
in Livy's own lifetime
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King Of Rome
The King of Rome
The King of Rome
(Latin: Rex Romae) was the chief magistrate of the Roman Kingdom.[1] According to legend, the first king of Rome
Rome
was Romulus, who founded the city in 753 BC upon the Palatine Hill. Seven legendary kings are said to have ruled Rome
Rome
until 509 BC, when the last king was overthrown. These kings ruled for an average of 35 years. The kings after Romulus
Romulus
were not known to be dynasts and no reference is made to the hereditary principle until after the fifth king Tarquinius Priscus
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