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Sportswriter
Sports journalism
Sports journalism
is a form of writing that reports on sporting topics and competitions. Basically physical educators who have a talent for writings may opt a career as a sports journalist Sports journalism
Sports journalism
is the essential element of many news media organizations
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Journalism
Journalism
Journalism
is the production and the distribution of reports on recent events. The word journalism applies to the occupation (professional or not), the methods of gathering information, and the organizing literary styles. Journalistic media include: print, television, radio, Internet, and, in the past, newsreels. Concepts of the appropriate role for journalism vary between countries. In some nations, the news media is controlled by a government intervention, and is not a fully independent body.[1] In others, the news media is independent from the government but the profit motive is in tension with constitutional protections of freedom of the press. Access to freely available information gathered by independent and competing journalistic enterprises with transparent editorial standards can enable citizens to effectively participate in the political process
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Interpretive Journalism
Interpretive (or Interpretative) journalism or interpretive reporting requires a journalist to go beyond the basic facts related to an event and provide more in-depth news coverage. The lack of precise borders accompanied with diverse theoretical approaches related to what interpretative journalism is in the modern world results in the practice of interpretative journalism overlapping with various other genres of journalism, and furthermore operationalization of interpretative journalism becomes largely blurred. [1] Interpretive journalists must have atypical awareness with and comprehension of a subject with their work involving looking for systems, rationale and influences that explain what they are reporting.[2] The impact of interpretive journalism is when the reporting results in trend-setting articles, powerful think-pieces and further straying into the field of investigative reporting which has become the hallmark of good print journalism
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Broadcast Journalism
Broadcast journalism
Broadcast journalism
is the field of news and journals which are "broadcast", that is, published by electrical methods instead of the older methods, such as printed newspapers and posters. Broadcast methods include radio (via air, cable, and Internet), television (via air, cable, and Internet) and the World Wide Web. Such media disperse pictures (static and moving), visual text and sounds. Scripts for broadcast tend to be written differently from text to be read by the public. For instance, the former is generally less complex and more conversational
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Citizen Journalism
The concept of citizen journalism (also known as "public", "participatory", "democratic",[1] "guerrilla"[2] or "street" journalism[3]) is based upon public citizens "playing an active role in the process of collecting, reporting, analyzing, and disseminating news and information."[4] Similarly, Courtney C
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Civic Journalism
' Civic journalism
Civic journalism
(also known as journalism) is the idea of integrating journalism into the democratic process. The media not only informs the public, but it also works towards engaging citizens and creating public debate. The civic journalism movement is an attempt to abandon the notion that journalists and their audiences are spectators in political and social processes. In its place, the civic journalism movement seeks to treat readers and community members as participants. With a small but committed following, civic journalism has become as much of a philosophy as it is a practice.Contents1 History 2 Definition 3 Main tenets 4 Structure 5 Key proponents 6 Case studies 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] In the 1920s, before the notion of public journalism was developed, there was the famous debate between Walter Lippmann
Walter Lippmann
and John Dewey over the role of journalism in a democracy
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Collaborative Journalism
Collaborative journalism
Collaborative journalism
is a mode of journalism where multiple reporters or news organizations, without affiliation to a common parent organization, report on and contribute news items to a news story together.[1] It is practiced by both professional and amateur reporters. It is not to be mixed up with citizen journalism.Contents1 Further definition 2 History2.1 Panama Papers3 Football Leaks (2016/2017) 4 Differentiation from other styles of journalism 5 Link journalism 6 Implementation 7 Criticism 8 See also 9 ReferencesFurther definition[edit] Collaborative journalism
Collaborative journalism
involves the aggregation of information from numerous individuals or organizations into a single news story. Information is gathered through research or reporting, or added when readers examine, comment and build upon existing stories. Stories from the mainstream media are often built upon
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Comics Journalism
Comics
Comics
journalism, or Graphic journalism, is a form of journalism that covers news or non-fiction events using the framework of comics – a combination of words and drawn images. Although visual narrative storytelling has existed for thousands of years, the use of the comics medium to cover real-life events for news organizations, publications or publishers (in graphic novel format) is currently at an all-time peak. Historically, pictorial representation (typically engravings) of news events were commonly used before the proliferation of photography in publications such as The Illustrated London News
News
and Harper's Magazine. More recent writers/journalists and illustrators have attempted to increase validity of the genre by bringing journalism to the field in more direct ways. This includes coverage of foreign and local affairs where word balloons are actual quotes and sources are actual people featured in each story
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Community Journalism
Community
Community
journalism is locally-oriented, professional news coverage that typically focuses on city neighborhoods, individual suburbs or small towns, rather than metropolitan, state, national or world news. If it covers wider topics, community journalism concentrates on the effect they have on local readers. Community
Community
newspapers, often but not always publish weekly, and also tend to cover subjects larger news media do not. Some examples of topics are students on the honor roll at the local high school, school sports, crimes such as vandalism, zoning issues and other details of community life
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Data Journalism
Data journalism
Data journalism
is a journalism specialty reflecting the increased role that numerical data is used in the production and distribution of information in the digital era. It reflects the increased interaction between content producers (journalist) and several other fields such as design, computer science and statistics. From the point of view of journalists, it represents "an overlapping set of competencies drawn from disparate fields".[1] Data journalism
Data journalism
has been widely used to unite several concepts and link them to journalism. Some see these as levels or stages leading from the simpler to the more complex uses of new technologies in the journalistic process.[2] Designers are not always part of the process. According to author and data journalism trainer Henk van Ess,[3] "Datajournalism can be based on any data that has to be processed first with tools before a relevant story is possible
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Database Journalism
Database
Database
journalism or structured journalism is a principle in information management whereby news content is organized around structured pieces of data, as opposed to news stories
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Gonzo Journalism
Gonzo journalism is a style of journalism that is written without claims of objectivity, often including the reporter as part of the story via a first-person narrative. The word "gonzo" is believed to have been first used in 1970 to describe an article by Hunter S. Thompson, who later popularized the style. It is an energetic first-person participatory writing style in which the author is a protagonist, and it draws its power from a combination of social critique and self-satire.[1] It has since been applied to other subjective artistic endeavors. Gonzo journalism involves an approach to accuracy that concerns the reporting of personal experiences and emotions, in contrast to traditional journalism, which favors a detached style and relies on facts or quotations that can be verified by third parties
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Immersion Journalism
Immersion journalism
Immersion journalism
or immersionism is a style of journalism similar to gonzo journalism. In the style, journalists immerse themselves in a situation and with the people involved. The final product tends to focus on the experience, not the writer.Contents1 Overview 2 Examples2.1 Print 2.2 Film 2.3 Television and radio3 Notable figures3.1 Elizabeth Jane Cochrane 3.2 Jon Franklin 3.3 David S Pollack4 Criticism 5 ReferencesOverview[edit] Like Gonzo, immersionism details an individual's experiences from a deeply personal perspective. An individual will choose a situation, and immerse themselves in the events and people involved. Unlike Gonzo, however, it is less focused on the writer's life, and more about the writer's specific experiences
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Investigative Journalism
Investigative journalism
Investigative journalism
is a form of journalism in which reporters deeply investigate a single topic of interest, such as serious crimes, political corruption, or corporate wrongdoing. An investigative journalist may spend months or years researching and preparing a report. Investigative journalism
Investigative journalism
is a primary source of information. Most investigative journalism is conducted by newspapers, wire services, and freelance journalists
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Analytic Journalism
Analytic journalism
Analytic journalism
is a field of journalism that seeks to make sense of complex reality in order to create public understanding. It combines aspects of investigative journalism and explanatory reporting. Analytic journalism
Analytic journalism
can be seen as a response to professionalized communication from powerful agents, information overload, and growing complexity in a globalised world. It aims to create evidence-based interpretations of reality, often confronting dominant ways of understanding a specific phenomenon. It is distinctive in terms of research practices and journalistic product.[1] At times, it uses methods from social science research.[2] The journalist gains expertise on a particular topic, to identify a phenomenon that is not readily obvious. At its best, investigative journalism is deeply analytic, but its intent is primarily to expose. Analytic journalism's primary aim is to explain
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Creative Nonfiction
Creative nonfiction
Creative nonfiction
(also known as literary nonfiction or narrative nonfiction) is a genre of writing that uses literary styles and techniques to create factually accurate narratives
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