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Spiro Agnew
Spiro Theodore "Ted" Agnew (/spɪroʊ ˈæɡnjuː/; November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) was the 39th Vice President of the United States, serving from 1969 to his resignation in 1973. He was the second and most recent vice president to resign the office, after John C. Calhoun
John C. Calhoun
in 1832, and the only one to resign in disgrace. Agnew was born in Baltimore, Maryland, to an American mother and a Greek immigrant father. He attended Johns Hopkins University
Johns Hopkins University
and graduated from the University of Baltimore
Baltimore
School of Law, and entered the United States
United States
Army in 1941. Agnew served as an officer during World War II, earning the Bronze Star, and was in 1951 recalled for service during the Korean War
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Schenectady, New York
Schenectady /skəˈnɛktədi/[3][4] is a city in Schenectady County, New York, United States, of which it is the county seat. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 66,135. The name "Schenectady" is derived from a Mohawk word skahnéhtati meaning "beyond the pines". The city was founded on the south side of the Mohawk River
Mohawk River
by Dutch colonists in the 17th century, many from the Albany area. They were prohibited from the fur trade by the Albany monopoly, which kept its control after the English takeover in 1664. Residents of the new village developed farms on strip plots along the river. Connected to the west via the Mohawk River
Mohawk River
and Erie Canal, the city developed rapidly in the 19th century as part of the Mohawk Valley trade, manufacturing and transportation corridor
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Democratic Party (United States)
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (GOP). Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest political party.[16] The Democrats' dominant worldview was once social conservatism and economic liberalism while populism was its leading characteristic in the rural South. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
ran as a third-party candidate in the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party, leading to a switch of political platforms between the Democratic and Republican Party and Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
being elected as the first fiscally progressive Democrat. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

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Captain (United States O-3)
In the United States Army
United States Army
(USA), U.S. Marine Corps (USMC), and U.S. Air Force (USAF), captain (abbreviated "CPT" in the USA and "Capt" in the USMC and USAF is a company grade officer rank, with the pay grade of O-3. It ranks above first lieutenant and below major. It is equivalent to the rank of lieutenant in the Navy/Coast Guard officer rank system
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World War II
Pacific WarChina Pacific Ocean South-East Asia South West Pacific Japan Manchuria & North Korea Mediterranean and Middle EastNorth Africa East Africa Mediterranean Sea Adriatic Malta Yugoslavia Iraq Syria–Lebanon Iran Italy Dodecanese Southern France Other campaignsAtlantic Arctic Strategic bombing Americas French West Africa Indian Ocean Madagascar Contemporaneous warsSoviet–Japanese border conflicts Franco-Thai War Ecuadorian–Peruvian War Ili Rebellion World War II Alphabetical indices A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0–9Navigation CampaignsCountriesEquipment TimelineOutlineLists PortalCategoryBibliography vte World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis
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Bronze Star Medal
The Bronze Star Medal, unofficially the Bronze Star, is a United States decoration awarded to members of the United States Armed Forces for either heroic achievement, heroic service, meritorious achievement, or meritorious service in a combat zone. Whenever the medal is awarded by the Army and Air Force for acts of valor in combat, the "V" Device
"V" Device
is authorized for wear on the medal, and whenever the medal is awarded by the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard for acts of valor or meritorious service in combat, the Combat "V" is authorized for wear on the medal. Officers from the other Uniformed Services of the United States are eligible to receive this award, as are foreign soldiers who have served with or alongside a service branch of the United States Armed Forces.[5][6] Civilians serving with U.S. military forces in combat are also eligible for the award
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Korean War
Military stalemateNorth Korean invasion of South Korea
South Korea
repelled Subsequent U.S.-led United Nations
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U.S. Representative
Majority (238)     Republican (238)Minority (193)     Democratic (193)Vacant (4)     Vacant (4)Length of termTwo yearsElectionsVoting systemFirst-past-the-post in most states; nonpartisan blanket primary with a majoritarian second round in 3 statesLast electionNovember 8, 2016Next electionNovember 6, 2018Redistricting State legislatures or redistricting commissions, varies by stateMeeting placeHouse of Representatives chamber United States
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James Devereux
James Patrick Sinnott Devereux (February 20, 1903 – August 5, 1988) was a United States
United States
Marine Corps general, Navy Cross recipient, and Republican congressman. He was the Commanding Officer of the 1st Defense Battalion during the defense of Wake Island
Wake Island
in December 1941. He was captured on Wake Island
Wake Island
as a prisoner of war, along with his men, after a 15-day battle with the Japanese. After his release in September 1945, he concluded his military career in 1948 and represented the second congressional district of the state of Maryland in the United States House of Representatives
United States House of Representatives
for four terms from 1951–1959
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United States Attorney For The District Of Maryland
The U.S. Attorney for the District of Maryland is the chief federal law enforcement officer for the State of Maryland. Robert K. Hur is the United States Attorney
United States Attorney
for the District.[1] The United States District Court for the District of Maryland has jurisdiction over all cases prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney.Contents1 Organization 2 Former U.S. Attorneys for the District of Maryland 3 References 4 External linksOrganization[edit] The Office is organized into divisions handling civil, criminal, and civil rights matters. Former U.S. Attorneys for the District of Maryland[edit] Richard Potts
Richard Potts
1789–1792 Zebulon Hollingsworth 1792–1806 John Stephen 1806–1810 Thomas B. Dorsey 1810–1812 Elias Glenn 1812–1824 Nathaniel Williams 1824–1841 Zaccheus Collins Lee 1841–1845 William L
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America Flag Coat of arms Motto: "In God
God
We Trust"[1][a] .mw-parser-ou
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Conspiracy (crime)
In criminal law, a conspiracy is an agreement between two or more persons to commit a crime at some time in the future.[1] Criminal law
Criminal law
in some countries or for some conspiracies may require that at least one overt act be undertaken in furtherance of that agreement, to constitute an offense. There is no limit on the number participating in the conspiracy and, in most countries, no requirement that any steps have been taken to put the plan into effect (compare attempts which require proximity to the full offense). For the purposes of concurrence, the actus reus is a continuing one and parties may join the plot later and incur joint liability and conspiracy can be charged where the co-conspirators have been acquitted or cannot be traced
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Extortion
Extortion
Extortion
(also called shakedown, outwrestling and exaction) is a criminal offense of obtaining money, property, or services from an individual or institution, through coercion. It is sometimes euphemistically referred to as a "protection racket" since the racketeers often phrase their demands as payment for "protection" from (real or hypothetical) threats from unspecified other parties; though often, and almost always, the person or organization offering "protection" is the same one willing to cause harm if the money is not paid, and such is implied in the "protection" offer. Extortion
Extortion
is commonly practiced by organized crime groups. The actual obtainment of money or property is not required to commit the offense. Making a threat of violence which refers to a requirement of a payment of money or property to halt future violence is sufficient to commit the offense
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Tax Fraud
Tax
Tax
evasion is the illegal evasion of taxes by individuals, corporations, and trusts. Tax
Tax
evasion often entails taxpayers deliberately misrepresenting the true state of their affairs to the tax authorities to reduce their tax liability and includes dishonest tax reporting, such as declaring less income, profits or gains than the amounts actually earned, or overstating deductions. Tax
Tax
evasion is an activity commonly associated with the informal economy. One measure of the extent of tax evasion (the "tax gap") is the amount of unreported income, which is the difference between the amount of income that should be reported to the tax authorities and the actual amount reported. In contrast, tax avoidance is the legal use of tax laws to reduce one's tax burden
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Nolo Contendere
Nolo contendere is a legal term that comes from the Latin
Latin
phrase for "I do not wish to contend" and it is also referred to as a plea of no contest. In criminal trials in certain United States jurisdictions, it is a plea where the defendant neither admits nor disputes a charge, serving as an alternative to a pleading of guilty or not guilty. A no-contest plea, while not technically a guilty plea, has the same immediate effect as a guilty plea and is often offered as a part of a plea bargain.[1] In many jurisdictions a plea of nolo contendere is not a typical right and carries various restrictions on its use.Contents1 United States1.1 Residual effects 1.2 Alaska 1.3 California 1.4 Florida 1.5 Michigan 1.6 Texas 1.7 Virginia2 Commonwealth 3 See also 4 ReferencesUnited States[edit] In the United States, State law determines whether, and under what circumstances, a defendant may plead no contest in state criminal cases
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Tax Evasion
Tax
Tax
evasion is the illegal evasion of taxes by individuals, corporations, and trusts. Tax
Tax
evasion often entails taxpayers deliberately misrepresenting the true state of their affairs to the tax authorities to reduce their tax liability and includes dishonest tax reporting, such as declaring less income, profits or gains than the amounts actually earned, or overstating deductions. Tax
Tax
evasion is an activity commonly associated with the informal economy. One measure of the extent of tax evasion (the "tax gap") is the amount of unreported income, which is the difference between the amount of income that should be reported to the tax authorities and the actual amount reported. In contrast, tax avoidance is the legal use of tax laws to reduce one's tax burden
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