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Spanish Renaissance
The Spanish Renaissance
Renaissance
refers to a movement in Spain, emerging from the Italian Renaissance
Renaissance
in
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Italy
Coordinates: 43°N 12°E / 43°N 12°E / 43; 12Italian Republic Repubblica Italiana  (Italian)FlagEmblemAnthem: Il Canto degli Italiani  (Italian) "The Song of the Italians"Location of  Italy  (dark green) – in Europe  (light green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (light green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Rome 41°54′N 12°29′E / 41.900°N 12.483°E / 41.900; 12.483Official languages ItalianaNative languages see full listReligion83.3% Christians 12.4% irreligious 3.7% Muslims 0.2% Buddhists 0.1% Hindus 0.3% other religions[1]Demonym ItalianGovernment Unitary constitutional parliamentary republic• PresidentSergio Mattarella• Prime MinisterPaolo Gentiloni• President of the SenateElisabetta Casellati•&
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Americas
The Americas
Americas
(also collectively called America; French: Amérique, Dutch: Amerika, Spanish and Portuguese: América) comprise the totality of the continents of North and South America.[5][6][7] Together, they make up most of the land in Earth's western hemisphere and comprise the New World. Along with their associated islands, they cover 8% of Earth's total surface area and 28.4% of its land area. The topography is dominated by the American Cordillera, a long chain of mountains that runs the length of the west coast. The flatter eastern side of the Americas
Americas
is dominated by large river basins, such as the Amazon, St. Lawrence River / Great Lakes
Great Lakes
basin, Mississippi, and La Plata
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Art
Art
Art
is a diverse range of human activities in creating visual, auditory or performing artifacts (artworks), expressing the author's imaginative or technical skill, intended to be appreciated for their beauty or emotional power.[1][2] In their most general form these activities include the production of works of art, the criticism of art, the study of the history of art, and the aesthetic dissemination of art. The oldest documented forms of art are visual arts, which include creation of images or objects in fields including today painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, and other visual media
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Literature
Literature, most generically, is any body of written works. More restrictively, literature refers to writing considered to be an art form or any single writing deemed to have artistic or intellectual value, often due to deploying language in ways that differ from ordinary usage. Its Latin root literatura/litteratura (derived itself from littera: letter or handwriting) was used to refer to all written accounts. The concept has changed meaning over time to include texts that are spoken or sung (oral literature), and non-written verbal art forms. Developments in print technology have allowed an ever-growing distribution and proliferation of written works, culminating in electronic literature. Literature
Literature
is classified according to whether it is fiction or non-fiction, and whether it is poetry or prose
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Quotation
A quotation is the repetition of one expression as part of another one, particularly when the quoted expression is well-known or explicitly attributed by citation to its original source, and it is indicated by (punctuated with) quotation marks. A quotation can also refer to the repeated use of units of any other form of expression, especially parts of artistic works: elements of a painting, scenes from a movie or sections from a musical composition.Contents1 Reasons for using quotations 2 Common quotation sources 3 Quotations and the Internet 4 United Kingdom
United Kingdom<

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Science
Science
Science
(from the Latin
Latin
word scientia, meaning "knowledge")[1] is a systematic
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Early Modern Warfare
Early modern warfare
Early modern warfare
is associated with the start of the widespread use of gunpowder and the development of suitable weapons to use the explosive, including artillery and firearms; for this reason the era is also referred to as the age of gunpowder warfare (a concept introduced by Michael Roberts in the 1950s). This entire period is contained within the Age of Sail, which characteristic dominated the era's naval tactics, including the use of gunpowder in naval artillery. All of the Great Powe
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Classical Antiquity
Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
(also the classical era, classical period or classical age) is the long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
Sea, comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome, collectively known as the Greco-Roman world. It is the period in which Greek and Roman society flourished and wielded great influence throughout Europe, North Africa
North Africa
and Western Asia. Conventionally, it is taken to begin with the earliest-recorded Epic Greek poetry of Homer
Homer
(8th–7th century BC), and continues through the emergence of Christianity
Christianity
and the decline of the Roman Empire (5th century AD)
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Judaism
Judaism
Judaism
(originally from Hebrew יהודה‬, Yehudah, "Judah";[1][2] via Latin
Latin
and Greek) is an ancient, monotheistic, Abrahamic religion with the Torah
Torah
as its foundational text.[3] It encompasses the religion, philosophy and culture of the Jewish people.[4] Judaism
Judaism
is considered by religious Jews
Jews
to be the expression of the covenant that God
God
established with the Children of Israel.[5] Judaism
Judaism
includes a wide corpus of texts, practices, theological positions, and forms of organization. The Torah
Torah
is part of the larger text known as the Tanakh or the Hebrew Bible, and supplemental oral tradition represented by later texts such as the Midrash
Midrash
and the Talmud
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Grammar
In linguistics, grammar (from Greek: γραμματική) is the set of structural rules governing the composition of clauses, phrases, and words in any given natural language. The term refers also to the study of such rules, and this field includes phonology, morphology, and syntax, often complemented by phonetics, semantics, and pragmatics. Speakers of a language have a set of internalized rules[1] for using that language and these rules constitute that language's grammar. The vast majority of the information in the grammar is — at least in the case of one's native language—acquired not by conscious study or instruction, but by observing other speakers
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Spain
Coordinates: 40°N 4°W / 40°N 4°W / 40; -4Kingdom of SpainReino de España  (Spanish) 4 other official names[a][b] Catalan:Regne d'EspanyaBasque:Espainiako ErresumaGalician:Reino de EspañaOccitan:Reiaume d'Espanha Flag Coat of arms Motto: "Plus ultra" (Latin) "Further Beyond"Anthem: "Marcha Real" (Spanish)[2] "Royal March" Show globeShow map of EuropeLocation of .mw-parser-output .nobold font-weight:normal Spain (dark green)– in Europe (green & dark grey)– in the European Union (green)Capitaland largest cityMadrid40°26′N 3°42′W / 40.433°N 3.700°W / 40.433; -3.700Official language and national languageSpanish[c]Ethnic groups (2019)[4]89.67% Spaniards10.33% othersReligion (2019)[5]67.0% Catholicism27.2% No religion3.1% Other religionsDemonym(s)S
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Gramática De La Lengua Castellana
Gramática de la lengua castellana
Gramática de la lengua castellana
(" Grammar
Grammar
of the Castilian Language", originally titled in Latin: Grammatica Antonii Nebrissensis) is a book written by Antonio de Nebrija
Antonio de Nebrija
and published in 1492. It was the first work dedicated to the Spanish language
Spanish language
and its rules, and the first grammar of a modern European language to be published
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Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor
Charles V (Spanish: Carlos; German: Karl; Italian: Carlo; Latin: Carolus; Dutch: Karel; French: Charles, [a] 24 February 1500 – 21 September 1558) was ruler of both the Spanish Empire
Spanish Empire
as Charles I from 1516 and the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
as Charles V from 1519, as well as of the lands of the former Duchy of Burgundy
Duchy of Burgundy
from 1506. He voluntarily stepped down from these and other positions by a series of abdications between 1554 and 1556. Through inheritance, he brought together under his rule extensive territories in western, central, and southern Europe, and the Spanish viceroyalties in the Americas and Asia
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Titian
Tiziano Vecelli or Tiziano Vecellio (pronounced [titˈtsjaːno veˈtʃɛlljo]; c. 1488/1490[1] – 27 August 1576),[2] known in English as Titian
Titian
/ˈtɪʃən/, was an Italian painter, the most important member of the 16th-century Venetian school. He was born in Pieve di Cadore, near Belluno
Belluno
(in Veneto, Republic of Venice).[3] During his lifetime he was often called da Cadore, taken from the place of his birth. Recognized by his contemporaries as "The Sun Amidst Small Stars" (recalling the famous final line of Dante's Paradiso), Titian
Titian
was one of the most versatile of Italian painters, equally adept with portraits, landscape backgrounds, and mythological and religious subjects
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Paolo Da San Leocadio
Pablo da San Leocadio or Paolo da Reggio (10 September 1447 – c. 1520) was an Italian painter from Reggio Emilia, who was mostly active in Spain.Contents1 Biography 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] In the 1450s or 1460 he moved to Ferrara, where he was influenced by local painters such as Bono da Ferrara
Ferrara
and Ercole de' Roberti. In 1472 he sailed from Ostia to Valencia, for Cardinal Rodrigo Borgia, the future Pope Alexander VI. He painted, in 1506, in conjunction with Francesco Pagano, the doors of the high altar of the cathedral of Valencia, with subjects from the Life of the Virgin
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