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Southern Review
The Southern Review
The Southern Review
is a quarterly literary magazine that was established by Robert Penn Warren
Robert Penn Warren
in 1935 at the behest of Charles W. Pipkin and funded by Huey Long
Huey Long
as a part of his investment in Louisiana State University.[1] It publishes fiction, poetry, critical essays, and excerpts from novels in progress by established and emerging writers and includes reproductions of visual art. The Southern Review continues to follow Warren's articulation of the mission when he said that it gives "writers decent company between the covers, and [concentrates] editorial authority sufficiently for the journal to have its own distinctive character and quality".Contents1 History1.1 Reception 1.2 Timeline2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksHistory[edit] The initial staff consisted of editor-in-chief Charles W
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JSTOR
JSTOR
JSTOR
(/ˈdʒeɪstɔːr/ JAY-stor;[3] short for Journal Storage) is a digital library founded in 1995. Originally containing digitized back issues of academic journals, it now also includes books and primary sources, and current issues of journals.[4] It provides full-text searches of almost 2,000 journals.[5] As of 2013, more than 8,000 institutions in more than 160 countries had access to JSTOR;[5] most access is by subscription, but some older public domain content is freely available to anyone.[6] JSTOR's revenue was $69 million in 2014.[7]Contents1 History 2 Content 3 Access3.1 Aaron Swartz
Aaron Swartz
incident 3.2 Limitations 3.3 Increasing public access4 Use 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] William G
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Novel
A novel is a relatively long work of narrative fiction, normally in prose, which is typically published as a book. The genre has been described as having "a continuous and comprehensive history of about two thousand years,"[1] with its origins in classical Greece and Rome, in medieval and early modern romance, and in the tradition of the novella. The latter, an Italian word for a short story to distinguish it from a novel, has been used in English since the 18th century for a work that falls somewhere in between. Ian Watt, in The Rise of the Novel, suggested in 1957 that the novel first came into being in the early 18th century. Miguel de Cervantes
Miguel de Cervantes
author of Don Quixote
Don Quixote
(the first part of which was published in 1605), is frequently cited as the first significant European novelist of the modern era.[2] The romance is a closely related long prose narrative
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Ford Madox Ford
Ford Madox Ford
Ford Madox Ford
(born Ford Hermann Hueffer (/ˈhɛfər/ HEF-ər);[1] 17 December 1873 – 26 June 1939) was an English novelist, poet, critic and editor whose journals, The English Review and The Transatlantic Review, were instrumental in the development of early 20th-century English literature. Ford is now remembered for his novels The Good Soldier
The Good Soldier
(1915), the Parade's End tetralogy (1924–28) and The Fifth Queen
The Fifth Queen
trilogy (1906–08)
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Randall Jarrell
Randall Jarrell (May 6, 1914 – October 14, 1965) was an American poet, literary critic, children's author, essayist, novelist, and the 11th Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, a position that now bears the title Poet Laureate.Contents1 Biography1.1 Youth and education 1.2 Career 1.3 Depression and death2 Legacy 3 Writing3.1 Poetry 3.2 Criticism 3.3 Fiction, translations, and children's books4 Bibliography 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Youth and education[edit] Jarrell was a native of Nashville, Tennessee. He attended Hume-Fogg High School where he "practiced tennis, starred in some school plays, and began his career as a critic with satirical essays in a school magazine."[1] He received his B.A
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John Crowe Ransom
John Crowe Ransom
John Crowe Ransom
(April 30, 1888 – July 3, 1974) was an American educator, scholar, literary critic, poet, essayist and editor. He is considered to be a founder of the New Criticism school of literary criticism. As a faculty member at Kenyon College, he was the first editor of the widely regarded Kenyon Review
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All The King's Men (1949 Film)
Kings
Kings
or King's may refer to:Monarchs: The Sovereign Heads of states and/or nations, with the male being kings One of several works known as the "Book of Kings":The Books of Kings
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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James Olney
James Fred Olney (1 August 1914 – 14 September 1944) was an English professional footballer who played in the Football League for Birmingham and Swindon Town.[1][2] Olney was born in Greet, Birmingham
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Editor-in-Chief
An editor-in-chief, also known as lead editor, chief editor, managing or executive editor, is a publication's editorial leader who has final responsibility for its operations and policies.[1][2]Contents1 Description 2 References 3 Further reading 4 External linksDescription[edit] The editor-in-chief heads all departments of the organization and is held accountable for delegating tasks to staff members and managing them. The term is often used at newspapers, magazines, yearbooks, and television news programs. The editor-in-chief is commonly the link between the publisher or proprietor and the editorial stafplied to academic journals, where the editor-in-chief gives the ultimate decision whether a submitted manuscript will be published
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Aldous Huxley
Aldous Leonard Huxley (/ˈɔːldəs ˈhʌksli/; 26 July 1894 – 22 November 1963) was an English writer, novelist, philosopher,[1][2][3][4] and prominent member of the Huxley family. He graduated from Balliol College at the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
with a first class honours degree in English literature. The author of nearly fifty books,[5][6] he was best known for his novels including Brave New World, set in a dystopian future; for nonfiction works, such as The Doors of Perception, which recalls experiences when taking a psychedelic drug; and a wide-ranging output of essays. Early in his career Huxley edited the magazine Oxford Poetry and published short stories and poetry. Mid career and later, he published travel writing, film stories, and scripts. He spent the later part of his life in the United States, living in Los Angeles from 1937 until his death
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Visual Art
The visual arts are art forms such as ceramics, drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, design, crafts, photography, video, filmmaking, and architecture. Many artistic disciplines (performing arts, conceptual art, textile arts) involve aspects of the visual arts as well as arts of other types. Also included within the visual arts[1] are the applied arts[2] such as industrial design, graphic design, fashion design, interior design and decorative art.[3] Current usage of the term "visual arts" includes fine art as well as the applied, decorative arts and crafts, but this was not always the case. Before the Arts and Crafts Movement
Arts and Crafts Movement
in Britain and elsewhere at the turn of the 20th century, the term 'artist' was often restricted to a person working in the fine arts (such as painting, sculpture, or printmaking) and not the handicraft, craft, or applied art media
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Essay
An essay is, generally, a piece of writing that gives the author's own argument — but the definition is vague, overlapping with those of a paper, an article, a pamphlet, and a short story. Essays have traditionally been sub-classified as formal and informal. Formal essays are characterized by "serious purpose, dignity, logical organization, length," whereas the informal essay is characterized by "the personal element (self-revelation, individual tastes and experiences, confidential manner), humor, graceful style, rambling structure, unconventionality or novelty of theme," etc.[1] Essays are commonly used as literary criticism, political manifestos, learned arguments, observations of daily life, recollections, and reflections of the author. Almost all modern essays are written in prose, but works in verse have been dubbed essays (e.g., Alexander Pope's An Essay on Criticism
An Essay on Criticism
and An Essay
Essay
on Man)
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Poetry
Poetry
Poetry
(the term derives from a variant of the Greek term, poiesis, "making") is a form of literature that uses aesthetic and rhythmic[1][2][3] qualities of language—such as phonaesthetics, sound symbolism, and metre—to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning. Poetry
Poetry
has a long history, dating back to the Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh. Early poems evolved from folk songs such as the Chinese Shijing, or from a need to retell oral epics, as with the Sanskrit Vedas, Zoroastrian Gathas, and the Homeric epics, the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey. Ancient attempts to define poetry, such as Aristotle's Poetics, focused on the uses of speech in rhetoric, drama, song and comedy
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Fiction
Fiction
Fiction
is a story or setting that is derived from imagination—in other words, not based strictly on history or fact.[1][2][3] Fiction can be expressed in a variety of formats, including writings, live performances, films, television programs, animations, video games, and role-playing games, though the term originally and most commonly refers to the narrative forms of literature (see literary fiction),[4] including novels, novellas, short stories, and plays. Fiction
Fiction
is occasionally used in its narrowest sense to mean simply any "literary narrative".[5] A work of fiction is an act of creative imagination, so its total faithfulness to the real-world is not typically assumed by its audience.[6] Therefore, fiction is not commonly expected to present only characters who are actual people or descriptions that are factually accurate
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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