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Southeastern Conference
The Southeastern Conference
Southeastern Conference
(SEC) is an American college athletic conference whose member institutions are located primarily in the Southern part of the United States. Its fourteen members include the flagship public universities of eleven states, two additional public land grant universities, and one private research university. The conference is headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama
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Arkansas
Arkansas
Arkansas
(/ˈɑːrkənsɔː/ AR-kən-saw)[c] is a state in the southeastern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2017.[7][8] Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians.[9] The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas
Arkansas
Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and the Arkansas
Arkansas
Delta. Arkansas
Arkansas
is the 29th largest by area and the 33rd most populous of the 50 United States. The capital and most populous city is Little Rock, located in the central portion of the state, a hub for transportation, business, culture, and government
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South Carolina
South Carolina
South Carolina
(/ˌkærəˈlaɪnə/ ( listen)) is a U.S. state in the southeastern region of the United States. The state is bordered to the north by North Carolina, to the south and west by Georgia, across the Savannah River, and to the east by the Atlantic Ocean. South Carolina
South Carolina
became the eighth state to ratify the U.S. Constitution, on May 23, 1788. South Carolina
South Carolina
became the first state to vote in favor of secession from the Union on December 20, 1860. After the American Civil War, it was readmitted into the United States on June 25, 1868. South Carolina
South Carolina
is the 40th most extensive and 23rd most populous U.S. state. Its GDP
GDP
as of 2013 was $183.6 billion, with an annual growth rate of 3.13%.[6] South Carolina
South Carolina
is composed of 46 counties
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East South Central States
The East South Central states constitute one of the nine Census Bureau Divisions of the United States.A map of the United States Census Bureau Region 3, Division 6, "East South Central", consisting of the states of Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Tennessee.Four states make up the division: Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Tennessee. The division is one of three that together make up the larger Census Bureau Region known as the South (the other two of which are the South Atlantic states and the West South Central states). The East South Central States form the core of Old Dixie,[citation needed] one of the nine moral regions identified by James Patterson and Peter Kim in their acclaimed 1991 geopolitical best-seller, The Day America Told The Truth. Demographics[edit] As of 2010, the East South Central states had a combined population of 18,022,810
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South Atlantic States
The South Atlantic United States
United States
form one of the nine Census Bureau Divisions within the United States
United States
that are recognized by the United States Census Bureau.The South Atlantic States, U.S. Census Bureau Region
Census Bureau Region
3, Division 5, consisting of the states of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and the District of Columbia.The South Atlantic States, U.S. Census Bureau Region
Census Bureau Region
3, Division 5, consisting of the states of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and the District of Columbia
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Mississippi
Mississippi
Mississippi
(/ˌmɪsɪˈsɪpi/ ( listen)) is a state in the Southern United States, with part of its southern border formed by the Gulf of Mexico. Its western border is formed by the Mississippi
Mississippi
River. The state has a population of approximately 3 million. It is the 32nd most extensive and the 32nd most populous of the 50 United States. Located in the center of the state, Jackson is the state capital and largest city, with a population of approximately 175,000 people. The state is heavily forested outside of the Mississippi Delta
Mississippi Delta
area, between the Mississippi
Mississippi
and Yazoo rivers. Before the American Civil War, most development in the state was along riverfronts, where slaves worked on cotton plantations. After the war, the bottomlands to the interior were cleared, mostly by freedmen
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Midwestern United States
The Midwestern United States, also referred to as the American Midwest, Middle West, or simply the Midwest, is one of four geographic regions defined by the United States
United States
Census Bureau. It occupies the northern central part of the United States
United States
of America.[2] It was officially named the North Central region by the Census Bureau until 1984.[3] It is located between the Northeastern U.S.
Northeastern U.S.
and the Western U.S., with Canada
Canada
to its north and the Southern U.S.
Southern U.S.
to its south. The Census Bureau's definition consists of 12 states in the north central United States: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin
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West North Central States
The West North Central states form one of the nine geographic subdivisions within the United States that are officially recognized by the U.S. Census Bureau. Seven states compose the division: Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota, and it makes up the western half of the United States Census Bureau's larger region of the Midwest, the eastern half of which consists of the East North Central states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin
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Knoxville, Tennessee
Knoxville
Knoxville
is a city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Tennessee, and the county seat of Knox County.[13] The city had an estimated population of 186,239 in 2016[7] and a population of 178,874 as of the 2010 census, making it the state's third largest city after Nashville and Memphis.[14] Knoxville
Knoxville
is the principal city of the Knoxville Metropolitan Statistical Area, which, in 2016, was 868,546, up 0.9 percent, or 7,377 people, from to 2015.[15] The KMSA is, in turn, the central component of the Knoxville-Sevierville-La Follette Combined Statistical Area, which, in 2013, had a population of 1,096,961. First settled in 1786, Knoxville
Knoxville
was the first capital of Tennessee. The city struggled with geographic isolation throughout the early 19th century
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Kentucky
Kentucky
Kentucky
(/kənˈtʌki/ ( listen) kən-TUK-ee), officially the Commonwealth of Kentucky, is a state located in the east south-central region of the United States. Although styled as the "State of Kentucky" in the law creating it,[5] Kentucky
Kentucky
is one of four U.S. states constituted as a commonwealth (the others being Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts). Originally a part of Virginia, in 1792 Kentucky
Kentucky
became the 15th state to join the Union. Kentucky
Kentucky
is the 37th most extensive and the 26th most populous of the 50 United States. Kentucky
Kentucky
is known as the "Bluegrass State", a nickname based on the bluegrass found in many of its pastures due to the fertile soil
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Border States (American Civil War)
In the context of the American Civil War
American Civil War
(1861–65), the border states were slave states that did not declare a secession from the Union and did not join the Confederacy. To their north they bordered free states of the Union and to their south they bordered Confederate slave states. Of the 34 U.S. states
U.S. states
in 1861, nineteen were free states and fifteen were slave states. Four slave states never declared a secession: Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Four others did not declare secession until after the Battle of Fort Sumter
Battle of Fort Sumter
and were briefly considered to be border states: Arkansas, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia—after this, they were less frequently called “border states”
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Athens, Georgia
Athens
Athens
(formally known as Athens-Clarke County) is a consolidated city–county and American college town in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Georgia, about 60 miles northeast from Downtown Atlanta. The University of Georgia, the state's flagship university and a Tier I research institution, is located in Athens
Athens
and contributed to its initial growth
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National Collegiate Athletic Association
The National Collegiate Athletic Association
National Collegiate Athletic Association
(NCAA)[a] is a non-profit organization which regulates athletes of 1,281 institutions and conferences. It also organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States
United States
and Canada, and helps more than 480,000 college student-athletes who compete annually in college sports. The organization is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana. In its 2016-17 fiscal year the NCAA took in $1.06 billion dollars in revenue, over 82% of which was generated by the Division I Men's Basketball
Basketball
Tournament
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Missouri
Missouri
Missouri
is a state in the Midwestern
Midwestern
United States.[5] With over six million residents, it is the 18th-most populous state of the Union. The largest urban areas are Kansas
Kansas
City, St. Louis, Springfield, and Columbia; the capital is Jefferson City, located on the Missouri River. The state is the 21st-most extensive in area. In the South are the Ozarks, a forested highland, providing timber, minerals, and recreation. The Mississippi River
Mississippi River
forms the eastern border of the state. Humans have inhabited the land now known as Missouri
Missouri
for at least 12,000 years. The Mississippian culture
Mississippian culture
built cities and mounds, before declining in the 1300s. When European explorers arrived in the 1600s they encountered the Osage and Missouria
Missouria
nations
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Georgia (U.S. State)
Georgia (/ˈdʒɔːrdʒə/ ( listen) JOR-jə) is a state in the Southeastern United States. It began as a British colony in 1733, the last of the original Thirteen Colonies.[5] Named after King George II of Great Britain,[6] the Province of Georgia
Province of Georgia
covered the area from South Carolina
South Carolina
down to Spanish Florida
Spanish Florida
and New France
New France
along Louisiana (New France), also bordering to the west towards the Mississippi River. Georgia was the fourth state to ratify the United States Constitution, on January 2, 1788.[7] In 1802–1804, western Georgia was split to the Mississippi
Mississippi
Territory, which later split to form Alabama
Alabama
with part of former West Florida
West Florida
in 1819
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