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Southeast University School Of Architecture
Architecture
Architecture
is both the process and the product of planning, designing, and constructing buildings or any other structures.[3] Architectural works, in the material form of buildings, are often perceived as cultural symbols and as works of art. Historical civilizations are often identified with their surviving architectural achievements. The term architecture is also used metaphorically to refer to the design of organizations and other abstract concepts
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Architect
An architect is a person who plans, designs, and reviews the construction of buildings. To practice architecture means to provide services in connection with the design of buildings and the space within the site surrounding the buildings, that have as their principal purpose human occupancy or use.[1] Etymologically, architect derives from the Latin architectus, which derives from the Greek (arkhi-, chief + tekton, builder), i.e., chief builder.[2] Professionally, an architect's decisions affect public safety, and thus an architect must undergo specialized training consisting of advanced education and a practicum (or internship) for practical experience to earn a license to practice architecture
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Oscar Niemeyer
Oscar Ribeiro de Almeida Niemeyer Soares Filho (December 15, 1907 – December 5, 2012), known as Oscar Niemeyer
Oscar Niemeyer
(Brazilian Portuguese: [ˈoskaʁ ni.e'majeʁ]), was a Brazilian architect considered to be one of the key figures in the development of modern architecture. Niemeyer was best known for his design of civic buildings for Brasília, a planned city that became Brazil's capital in 1960, as well as his collaboration with other architects on the headquarters of the United Nations
United Nations
in New York
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Charles Barry
Sir Charles Barry
Charles Barry
FRS RA (23 May 1795 – 12 May 1860) was an English architect, best known for his role in the rebuilding of the Palace of Westminster
Westminster
(also known as the Houses of Parliament) in London during the mid-19th century, but also responsible for numerous other buildings and gardens. He is known for his major contribution to the use of Italianate architecture
Italianate architecture
in Britain,[1] especially the use of the Palazzo as basis for the design of country houses, city mansions and public buildings
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Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin
Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (/ˈpjuːdʒɪn/ PEW-jin; 1 March 1812 – 14 September 1852) was an English architect, designer, artist, and critic who is principally remembered for his pioneering role in the Gothic Revival
Gothic Revival
style of architecture. His work culminated in designing the interior of the Palace of Westminster
Palace of Westminster
in Westminster, London, England
England
and its iconic clock tower, later renamed the Elizabeth Tower, which houses the bell known as Big Ben
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Gothic Architecture
Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
is an architectural style that flourished in Europe
Europe
during the High and Late Middle Ages. It evolved from Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
and was succeeded by Renaissance
Renaissance
architecture. Originating in 12th century France
France
and lasting into the 16th century, Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
was known during the period as Opus Francigenum ("French work") with the term Gothic first appearing during the later part of the Renaissance. Its characteristics include the pointed arch, the ribbed vault (which evolved from the joint vaulting of Romanesque architecture) and the flying buttress. Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
is most familiar as the architecture of many of the great cathedrals, abbeys and churches of Europe
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John Ruskin
John Ruskin
John Ruskin
(8 February 1819 – 20 January 1900) was the leading English art critic of the Victorian era, as well as an art patron, draughtsman, watercolourist, a prominent social thinker and philanthropist. He wrote on subjects as varied as geology, architecture, myth, ornithology, literature, education, botany and political economy. His writing styles and literary forms were equally varied. He penned essays and treatises, poetry and lectures, travel guides and manuals, letters and even a fairy tale. He also made detailed sketches and paintings of rocks, plants, birds, landscapes, and architectural structures and ornamentation. The elaborate style that characterised his earliest writing on art gave way in time to plainer language designed to communicate his ideas more effectively
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Seven Lamps Of Architecture
The Seven Lamps of Architecture
Architecture
is an extended essay, first published in May 1849 and written by the English art critic and theorist John Ruskin. The 'lamps' of the title are Ruskin's principles of architecture, which he later enlarged upon in the three-volume The Stones of Venice.[1] To an extent, they codified some of the contemporary thinking behind the Gothic Revival. At the time of its publication A. W. N. Pugin
A. W. N. Pugin
and others had already advanced the ideas of the Revival and it was well under way in practice. Ruskin offered little new to the debate, but the book helped to capture and summarise the thoughts of the movement
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Course (architecture)
A course is a layer of the same unit running horizontally in a wall. It can also be defined as a continuous row of any masonry unit such as bricks, concrete masonry units (CMU), stone, shingles, tiles, etc.[1] Coursed masonry construction is that in which units are arranged in regular courses, and not irregularly
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Rustication (architecture)
In classical architecture rustication is a range of masonry techniques giving visible surfaces a finish that contrasts in texture with the smoothly finished, squared-block masonry surfaces called ashlar. The visible face of each individual block is cut back around the edges to make its size and placing very clear. In addition the central part of the face of each block may be given a deliberately rough or patterned surface.[1] Rusticated masonry is usually "dressed", or squared off neatly, on all sides of the stones except the face that will be visible when the stone is put in place. This is given wide joints that emphasize the edges of each block, by angling the edges ("channel-jointed"), or dropping them back a little. The main part of the exposed face may worked flat and smooth or left or worked with a more or less rough or patterned surface. Rustication is often used to give visual weight to the ground floor in contrast to smooth ashlar above
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Le Corbusier
Charles-Édouard Jeanneret, known as Le Corbusier
Le Corbusier
(French: [lə kɔʁbyˈzje]; 6 October 1887 – 27 August 1965), was a Swiss-French architect, designer, painter, urban planner, writer, and one of the pioneers of what is now called modern architecture. He was born in Switzerland
Switzerland
and became a French citizen in 1930. His career spanned five decades and he designed buildings in Europe, Japan, India, and North and South America. Dedicated to providing better living conditions for the residents of crowded cities, Le Corbusier
Le Corbusier
was influential in urban planning, and was a founding member of the Congrès International d'Architecture Moderne (CIAM)
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Ludwig Mies Van Der Rohe
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe
(/miːs/ MEESS; German: [miːs]; born Maria Ludwig Michael Mies; March 27, 1886 – August 17, 1969) was a German-American architect.[1] He is commonly referred to and was addressed as Mies, his surname. Along with Le Corbusier, Walter Gropius and Frank Lloyd Wright, he is widely regarded as one of the pioneers of modernist architecture. An innovative architect in 1920's and 1930's Germany, Mies was the last director of the Bauhaus, a seminal school in modern architecture. After Nazism's rise to power, and with its strong opposition to modernism (leading to the closing of the Bauhaus
Bauhaus
itself), Mies fled to the United States
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National Congress Of Brazil
Government (58)     MDB (22)      PSDB (10)      PP (7)      PSD (5)      DEM (4)      PR (4)      PTB (2)      PRB (1)      PSC (1)      PTC (1)      PPS (1)Opposition (20)     PT (9)      PSB (7)      PDT (2)      PCdoB (1)      REDE (1)Independent (2)     PV (1)      Independent (1)Chamber of Deputies political groupsGovernment (351)     MDB (65)      PSDB (47)      PP (47)      PR (39)      PSD (36)      DEM (29)      PRB (24)  
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Louis Sullivan
Louis Henry Sullivan (September 3, 1856 – April 14, 1924)[1] was an American architect, and has been called the "father of skyscrapers"[2] and "father of modernism".[3] He is considered by many as the creator of the modern skyscraper, was an influential architect and critic of the Chicago School, was a mentor to Frank Lloyd Wright, and an inspiration to the Chicago group of architects who have come to be known as the Prairie School. Along with Wright and Henry Hobson Richardson, Sullivan is one of "the recognized trinity of American architecture".[4] "Form follows function" is attributed to him although he credited the origin of the concept to an ancient Roman architect
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Lives Of The Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, And Architects
The Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects (Italian: Le Vite de' più eccellenti pittori, scultori, e architettori), also known as The Lives (Italian: Le Vite), is a series of artist biographies written by 16th-century Italian painter and architect Giorgio Vasari, which is considered "perhaps the most famous, and even today the most-read work of the older literature of art",[1] "some of the Italian Renaissance's most influential writing on art",[2] and "the first important book on art history".[3] The title is often abridged to just the Vite or the Lives. It was first published in two editions with substantial differences between them; the first in 1550 and the second in 1568 (which is the one usually translated and referred to)
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Form Follows Function
Form follows function
Form follows function
is a principle associated with 20th-century modernist architecture and industrial design which says that the shape of a building or object should primarily relate to its intended function or purpose.Contents1 Origins of the phrase 2 Debate on the functionality of ornamentation 3 Application in different fields3.1 Architecture 3.2 Product design 3.3 Software engineering 3.4 Automobile designing 3.5 Evolution4 See also 5 Notes and references 6 External linksOrigins of the phrase[edit] The architect Louis Sullivan
Louis Sullivan
coined the maxim, although it is often incorrectly attributed to the sculptor Horatio Greenough (1805 – 1852),[1] whose thinking mostly predates the later functionalist approach to architecture. Greenough's writings were for a long time largely forgotten, and were rediscovered only in the 1930s
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