HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

South Street Seaport
72000883[1] South Street Seaport
South Street Seaport
Historic DistrictU.S. National Register of Historic PlacesLocation Roughly bounded by East River, Brooklyn Bridge, Fletcher Alley, and Pearl and South Streets, Manhattan, New York City, United StatesArea 41 acres (17 ha)Architectural style Greek Revival, RomanesqueNRHP reference # 78001884[1]Added to NRHP December 12, 1978Added to NRHP October 18, 1972The South Street Seaport
South Street Seaport
is a historic area in the New York City borough of Manhattan, centered where Fulton Street meets the East River, and adjacent to the Financial District. The Seaport is a designated historic district, and is distinct from the neighboring Financial District
[...More...]

"South Street Seaport" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
[...More...]

"National Register Of Historic Places" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Red Star Line
The Red Star Line
Red Star Line
was an ocean passenger line founded in 1871 as a joint venture between the International Navigation Company
International Navigation Company
of Philadelphia, which also ran the American Line, and the Société Anonyme de Navigation Belgo-Américaine of Antwerp, Belgium. The company's main ports of call were Antwerp[1][2] in Belgium, Liverpool and Southampton[1] in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and New York City[1] and Philadelphia[3] in the United States.Contents1 History 2 Heritage 3 Ships 4 In popular culture 5 References5.1 Notes 5.2 Bibliography6 External linksHistory[edit] The company was founded by Clement Griscom, who led it from its founding until the International Mercantile Marine Co.
International Mercantile Marine Co.
took it over in 1902. Red Star Line
Red Star Line
survived IMM's financial crisis in 1915
[...More...]

"Red Star Line" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Empress Of China (1783)
Empress of China, also known as Chinese Queen, was a three-masted, square-rigged sailing ship of 360 tons,[3] initially built in 1783 for service as a privateer.[5] After the Treaty of Paris brought a formal end to the American Revolutionary War, the vessel was refitted for commercial purposes. She became the first American ship to sail from the newly independent United States to China, opening what is known today as the Old China Trade
Old China Trade
and transporting the first official representative of the American government to Canton.[6]Contents1 First voyage 2 Legacy 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksFirst voyage[edit] The first American merchant vessel to enter Chinese waters left New York harbor on Washington's birthday, February 22, 1784. The Empress returned to New York on May 11, 1785 after a round voyage of 14 months and 24 days. The success of the voyage encouraged others to invest in further trading with China
[...More...]

"Empress Of China (1783)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Guangzhou
Guangzhou
Guangzhou
(Chinese: 广州), formerly known as Canton,[6] is the capital and most populous city of the province of Guangdong
Guangdong
in southern China.[7] Located on the Pearl River about 120 km (75 mi) north-northwest of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and 145 km (90 mi) north of Macau, Guangzhou
Guangzhou
has a history of over 2,200 years and was a major terminus of the maritime Silk Road[8] and continues to serve as a major port and transportation hub today, as well as one of China's three largest cities.[9] Guangzhou
Guangzhou
is situated at the heart of the most-populous built-up metropolitan area in mainland China, an area that extends into the neighboring cities of Foshan, Dongguan, and Shenzhen, forming one of the largest urban agglomerations on the planet
[...More...]

"Guangzhou" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
[...More...]

"Philadelphia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Green Tea
Green tea
Green tea
is a type of tea that is made from Camellia sinensis
Camellia sinensis
leaves that have not undergone the same withering and oxidation process used to make oolong teas and black teas.[1] Green tea
Green tea
originated in China, but its production and manufacture has spread to many other countries in Asia. Several varieties of green tea exist, which differ substantially based on the variety of C
[...More...]

"Green Tea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Black Tea
Black tea
Black tea
is a type of tea that is more oxidized than oolong, green and white teas. Black tea
Black tea
is generally stronger in flavour than the less oxidized teas. All four types are made from leaves of the shrub (or small tree) Camellia sinensis. Two principal varieties of the species are used – the small-leaved Chinese variety plant (C. sinensis var. sinensis), used for most other types of teas, and the large-leaved Assamese plant (C. sinensis var. assamica), which was traditionally mainly used for black tea, although in recent years some green and white teas have been produced. In Chinese and the languages of neighbouring countries, black tea is literally translated as "red tea" (Chinese 紅茶 hóngchá, pronounced [xʊ̌ŋʈʂʰǎ]; Japanese 紅茶 kōcha; Korean 홍차 hongcha, Bengali লাল চা Lal cha, Assamese ৰঙা চাহ Ronga sah), a description of the colour of the liquid
[...More...]

"Black Tea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Porcelain
Porcelain
Porcelain
/ˈpɔːrsəlɪn, ˈpɔːrslɪn/ is a ceramic material made by heating materials, generally including kaolin, in a kiln to temperatures between 1,200 and 1,400 °C (2,200 and 2,600 °F). The toughness, strength, and translucence of porcelain, relative to other types of pottery, arises mainly from vitrification and the formation of the mineral mullite within the body at these high temperatures. Porcelain
Porcelain
slowly evolved in China and was finally achieved (depending on the definition used) at some point about 2,000 to 1,200 years ago, then slowly spread to other East Asian countries, and finally Europe and the rest of the world. Its manufacturing process is more demanding than that for earthenware and stoneware, the two other main types of pottery, and it has usually been regarded as the most prestigious type of pottery for its delicacy, strength, and its white colour
[...More...]

"Porcelain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Qing Empire
Tael
Tael
(liǎng)Preceded by Succeeded byLater JinShunSouthern MingDzungarRepublic of ChinaMongoliaThe Qing dynasty, also known as the Qing Empire, officially the Great Qing (English: /tʃɪŋ/), was the last imperial dynasty of China, established in 1636 and ruling China from 1644 to 1912. It was preceded by the Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
and succeeded by the Republic of China. The Qing multi-cultural empire lasted almost three centuries and formed the territorial base for the modern Chinese state. It was the fourth largest empire in world history. The dynasty was founded by the Jurchen Aisin Gioro
Aisin Gioro
clan in Manchuria. In the late sixteenth century, Nurhaci, originally a Ming vassal, began organizing "Banners", military-social units that included Jurchen, Han Chinese, and Mongol elements
[...More...]

"Qing Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Black Ball Line (trans-Atlantic Packet)
Black
Black
is the darkest color, the result of the absence or complete absorption of visible light. It is an achromatic color, literally a color without hue, like white (its opposite) and gray.[1] It is often used symbolically or figuratively to represent darkness, while white represents light.[2] Black
Black
ink is the most common color used for printing books, newspapers and documents, because it has the highest contrast with white paper and is the easiest to read. For the same reason, black text on a white screen is the most common format used on computer screens.[3] In color printing it is used along with the subtractive primaries cyan, yellow, and magenta, in order to help produce the darkest shades. Black
Black
and white have often been used to describe opposites; particularly truth and ignorance, good and evil, the "Dark Ages" versus Age of Enlightenment
[...More...]

"Black Ball Line (trans-Atlantic Packet)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Liverpool
Liverpool
Liverpool
(/ˈlɪvərpuːl/) is a city in North West England, with an estimated population of 484,578 in 2016 within the City
City
of Liverpool borough.[5] With its surrounding areas, it is the fifth-largest metropolitan area in the UK, with over 2.24 million people in 2011.[6] The local authority is Liverpool
Liverpool
City
City
Council, the most populous local government district within the metropolitan county of Merseyside
Merseyside
and the largest within the Liverpool
Liverpool
City
City
Region. Liverpool
Liverpool
is located on the eastern side of the Mersey Estuary, and historically lay within the ancient hundred of West Derby
West Derby
in the south west of the county of Lancashire.[7][8] It became a borough in 1207 and a city in 1880
[...More...]

"Liverpool" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Great Depression
The Great Depression
Great Depression
was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s.[1] It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century.[2] In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.[3] The Great Depression
Great Depression
started in the United States
United States
after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%
[...More...]

"Great Depression" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
[...More...]

"England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hunts Point, Bronx
Not to be confused with Hunters Point in Queens, New York.Hunts PointNeighborhood of The BronxThe BankNote in Hunts PointHunts PointLocation in New York City Show map of BronxHunts PointHunts Point (New York) Show map of New YorkHunts PointHunts Point (the US) Show map of the USCoordinates: 40°48′45″N 73°53′02″W / 40.812600°N 73.884024°W / 40.812600; -73.884024Coordinates: 40°48′45″N 73°53′02″W / 40.812600°N 73.884024°W / 40.812600; -73.884024Country  United StatesState  New YorkCity New York CityBorough BronxCommunity District Bronx 2[1]Founded 1849Named for Thomas HuntArea[2] • Total 4.27 km2 (1.650 sq mi)Population (2010)[3] • Total 27,204 • Density 6,400/km2 (16,000/sq mi)Economics • Median income
[...More...]

"Hunts Point, Bronx" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Erie Canal
The Erie Canal
Canal
is a canal in New York, United States
United States
that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal
Canal
System (formerly known as the New York State Barge
Barge
Canal). Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River
Hudson River
to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City
New York City
and the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world (after the Grand Canal
Canal
in China) and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.[2] The canal was first proposed in the 1780s, then re-proposed in 1807
[...More...]

"Erie Canal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.