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South Korean Literature
South Korean literature
Korean literature
is literature written or produced in South Korea
Korea
following the division of Korea
Korea
into North and South in 1945.[1] South Korean literature
Korean literature
is primarily written in Korean, though English loanwords are prevalent.[2]Contents1 Literature
Literature
by genre1.1 Novels1.1.1 See also1.2 Mass market fiction 1.3 Essayists 1.4 Poetry2 South Korean literary awards 3 References Literature
Literature
by genre[edit] Novels[edit] A representative barometer of serious fiction is provided by the choices of some contemporary authors by the Korea
Korea
Literature Translation Institute for translation into English, French, German and Spanish
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Korean Barbecue
Korean barbecue
Korean barbecue
(고기구이, gogi-gui, "meat roast") refers to the popular method in Korean cuisine
Korean cuisine
of grilling meat, typically beef, pork, or chicken. Such dishes are often prepared on gas or charcoal grills built into the dining table itself. Some Korean restaurants that do not have built-in grills provide customers with portable stoves for diners to use at their tables. Alternatively, a chef uses a centrally displayed grill to prepare dishes to order. The most representative form of gogi-gui is bulgogi, usually made from thinly sliced marinated beef sirloin or tenderloin. Another popular form is galbi, made from marinated beef short ribs.[1] However, gogi-gui also includes many other kinds of marinated and unmarinated meat dishes, and can be divided into several categories
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Korean Honorifics
The Korean language
Korean language
reflects the important observance of a speaker or writer's relationships with both the subject of the sentence and the audience. Korean grammar uses an extensive system of honorifics to reflect the speaker's relationship to the subject of the sentence and speech levels to reflect the speaker's relationship to the audience. Originally, the honorifics expressed the differences in social status between speakers
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Patbingsu
Patbingsu
Patbingsu
(팥빙수, sometimes anglicized as patbingsoo, literally "red beans shaved ice") is a popular Korean shaved ice dessert with sweet toppings that may include chopped fruit, condensed milk, fruit syrup, and red beans.[1] Varieties with ingredients other than red beans are called bingsu[2] (or bingsoo).[3] The food originally began as ice shavings with red bean paste (known as pat, 팥). Many varieties of patbingsu exist in contemporary culture.Contents1 History 2 Variations 3 Availability 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The early forms of patbingsu consisted of shaved ice and two or three ingredients, typically red bean paste, tteok, and ground nut powder.[4] The earliest forms of patbingsu existed during the Joseon Dynasty (1392–1910)
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Bibimbap
Bibimbap[2] (/ˈbiːbɪmbæp/ BEE-bim-bap,[3] from Korean bibimbap [pi.bim.p͈ap̚]), sometimes anglicized as bi bim bap or bi bim bop, is a Korean dish. The word literally means "mixed rice". Bibimbap
Bibimbap
is served as a bowl of warm white rice topped with namul (sautéed and seasoned vegetables) and gochujang (chili pepper paste), soy sauce, or doenjang (a fermented soybean paste). A raw or fried egg and sliced meat (usually beef) are common additions. The hot dish is stirred together thoroughly just before eating.[4] In South Korea, Jeonju, Jinju, and Tongyeong
Tongyeong
are especially famous for their versions of bibimbap.[5] In 2011, it was listed at number 40 on the World's 50 most delicious foods readers' poll compiled by CNN Travel.[6]Contents1 History 2 Preparation 3 Variations 4 Symbolism 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The name bibimbap was adopted in the early 20th century
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Seolleongtang
Seolleongtang[1] (설렁탕) or ox bone soup[1] is a Korean broth tang (soup) made from ox bones (mostly leg bones), brisket and other cuts. Seasoning is generally done at the table according to personal taste by adding salt, ground black pepper, red pepper, minced garlic, or chopped spring onions. It is a local dish of Seoul.[2] Seolleongtang
Seolleongtang
is typically simmered over a low flame over a period of several hours to an entire day, to allow the flavor to be gradually extracted from the bones. It has a milky off-white, cloudy appearance and is normally eaten together with rice and several side dishes; the rice is sometimes added directly to the soup.[3] History and etymology[edit] In the Joseon dynasty, Koreans regularly made nationwide sacrifices to their ancestors, such as Dangun
Dangun
(the legendary founder of the kingdom of Gojoseon)
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Kimchi
Kimchi
Kimchi
(/ˈkɪmtʃiː/; Korean: 김치, translit. gimchi, IPA: [kim.tɕʰi]), a staple in Korean cuisine, is a traditional side dish made from salted and fermented vegetables, most commonly napa cabbage and Korean radishes, with a variety of seasonings including chili powder, scallions, garlic, ginger, and jeotgal (salted seafood).[1][2] There are hundreds of varieties of kimchi made with different vegetables as the main ingredients.[3][4] In traditional preparations, kimchi was stored underground in jars to keep cool, and unfrozen during the winter months.[2] With the rise of technology, kimchi refrigerators are
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Korean Fried Chicken
Korean fried chicken
Korean fried chicken
or KFC,[1][2][3] usually called chikin (치킨, from the English "chicken") in Korea, refers to a variety of fried chicken dishes from South Korea, including the basic huraideu-chikin (후라이드 치킨, from the English "fried chicken") and spicy yangnyeom-chikin (양념 치킨, "seasoned chicken").[4] In South Korea, fried chicken is consumed as a meal, an appetizer, anju (food that is served and eaten with drinks), or as an after-meal snack.[5] Korean fried chicken
Korean fried chicken
differs from typical American fried chicken because it is fried twice; the skin is therefore crunchier and less greasy
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Tteok
Soups & stewsGuk Tang Jeongol Jijimi JjigaeBanchanBokkeum BuchimgaeJeonBugak Gui Hoe Jjim Jokpyeon Jorim Muk Namul Pyeonyuk Po Seon SsamDesserts HangwaDasik Gwapyeon Jeonggwa Kkultarae Suksilgwa Yakbap Yeot Yeotgangjeong YugwaGangjeong HangwaYumilgwaMandugwa Taraegwa YakgwaTteokBaekseolgi Bupyeon Gyeongdan Injeolmi Jeolpyeon Jeungpyeon Mujigae-tteok Siru-tteok SongpyeonBeverages List of Korean beveragesCha Hwachae Sikhye Sul(alcoholic beverages) SujeonggwaCondimentsDoenjang GanjangGukganjang EoganjangGochujang Honey Cheong Mustard sauce OilPerilla oil Sesame
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Banchan
Soups & stewsGuk Tang Jeongol Jijimi JjigaeBanchanBokkeum BuchimgaeJeonBugak Gui Hoe Jjim Jokpyeon Jorim Muk Namul Pyeonyuk Po Seon SsamDesserts HangwaDasik Gwapyeon Jeonggwa Kkultarae Suksilgwa Yakbap Yeot Yeotgangjeong YugwaGangjeong HangwaYumilgwaMandugwa Taraegwa YakgwaTteokBaekseolgi Bupyeon Gyeongdan Injeolmi Jeolpyeon Jeungpyeon Mujigae-tteok Siru-tteok SongpyeonBeverages List of Korean beveragesCha Hwachae Sikhye Sul(alcoholic beverages) SujeonggwaCondimentsDoenjang GanjangGukganjang EoganjangGochujang Honey Cheong Mustard sauce OilPerilla oil Sesame oilSsamjang VinegarPersimmon vinegar Rice vinegarUtensilsDolsot Onggi Siru Sujeo TtukbaegiOther
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Gochujang
Soups & stewsGuk Tang Jeongol Jijimi JjigaeBanchanBokkeum BuchimgaeJeonBugak Gui Hoe Jjim Jokpyeon Jorim Muk Namul Pyeonyuk Po Seon SsamDesserts HangwaDasik Gwapyeon Jeonggwa Kkultarae Suksilgwa Yakbap Yeot Yeotgangjeong YugwaGangjeong HangwaYumilgwaMandugwa Taraegwa YakgwaTteokBaekseolgi Bupyeon Gyeongdan Injeolmi Jeolpyeon Jeungpyeon Mujigae-tteok Siru-tteok SongpyeonBeverages List of Korean beveragesCha Hwachae Sikhye Sul(alcoholic beverages) SujeonggwaCondimentsDoenjang GanjangGukganjang EoganjangGochujang Honey Cheong Mustard sauce OilPerilla oil Sesame oilSsamjang VinegarPersimmon vinegar Rice vinegarUtensilsDolsot Onggi Siru Sujeo TtukbaegiOther
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Doenjang
Soups & stewsGuk Tang Jeongol Jijimi JjigaeBanchanBokkeum BuchimgaeJeonBugak Gui Hoe Jjim Jokpyeon Jorim Muk Namul Pyeonyuk Po Seon SsamDesserts HangwaDasik Gwapyeon Jeonggwa Kkultarae Suksilgwa Yakbap Yeot Yeotgangjeong YugwaGangjeong HangwaYumilgwaMandugwa Taraegwa YakgwaTteokBaekseolgi Bupyeon Gyeongdan Injeolmi Jeolpyeon Jeungpyeon Mujigae-tteok Siru-tteok SongpyeonBeverages List of Korean beveragesCha Hwachae Sikhye Sul(alcoholic beverages) SujeonggwaCondimentsDoenjang GanjangGukganjang EoganjangGochujang Honey Cheong Mustard sauce OilPerilla oil Sesame oilSsamjang VinegarPersimmon vinegar Rice
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Anju (food)
Anju (안주; 按酒 [an.dʑu]) is a Korean term for food consumed with alcohol. It consists of a variety of foods, including both main dishes and side dishes. Consuming food with alcohol is a widespread practice in Korea, especially when the alcoholic beverage soju is involved.[1][2] Food consumed with alcohol is called sakana (肴) in Japan. Certain types of foods consumed primarily as Anju include golbaengi muchim, nogari with peanuts, and jokbal.Contents1 History 2 By types of liquor 3 By the place where alcohol is served 4 Sample images 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingHistory[edit] Until the Chosun Dynasty, alcohol was mainly served in jumaks (a type of inn or tavern), where soups with rice, along with traditional alcohol such as makgeolli, were served to guests
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Makgeolli
Makgeolli
Makgeolli
(Korean: 막걸리, [mak.k͈ʌl.li]), sometimes anglicized to makkoli (/ˈmækəli/,[1] MAK-ə-lee), is a Korean alcoholic beverage
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Traditions
A tradition is a belief or behavior passed down within a group or society with symbolic meaning or special significance with origins in the past.[1][2] Common examples include holidays or impractical but socially meaningful clothes (like lawyers' wigs or military officers' spurs), but the idea has also been applied to social norms such as greetings. Traditions can persist and evolve for thousands of years—the word "tradition" itself derives from the Latin
Latin
tradere literally meaning to transmit, to hand over, to give for safekeeping. While it is commonly assumed that traditions have ancient history, many traditions have been invented on purpose, whether that be political or cultural, over short periods of time. Various academic disciplines also use the word in a variety of ways. One way tradition is used more simply, often in academic work but elsewhere also, is to indicate the quality of a piece of information being discussed
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Hangul
Hangul
Hangul
(/ˈhɑːnˌɡuːl/ HAHN-gool;[1] from Korean hangeul 한글 [ha(ː)n.ɡɯl]) is the Korean alphabet. It has been used to write the Korean language
Korean language
since its creation in the 15th century under Sejong the Great.[2][3] It is the official writing system of South Korea
South Korea
and North Korea. It is a co-official writing system in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County
Changbai Korean Autonomous County
in Jilin
Jilin
Province, China. It is sometimes used to write the Cia-Cia language
Cia-Cia language
spoken near the town of Bau-Bau, Indonesia. The alphabet consists of 19 consonants and 21 vowels. Hangul
Hangul
letters are grouped into syllabic blocks, vertically and horizontally
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