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South Eastern Main Line
A detailed diagram of the line can be found at South Eastern main line
South Eastern main line
diagramThe South Eastern main line
South Eastern main line
is a major long-distance railway route in South East England, UK, one of the two main routes crossing the county of Kent, going via Sevenoaks, Tonbridge, Ashford and Folkestone
Folkestone
to Dover
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River Thames
The River Thames
River Thames
(/tɛmz/ ( listen) TEMZ) is a river that flows through southern England, most notably through London. At 215 miles (346 km), it is the longest river entirely in England
England
and the second longest in the United Kingdom, after the River Severn. It also flows through Oxford
Oxford
(where it is called Isis), Reading, Henley-on-Thames
Henley-on-Thames
and Windsor. The lower reaches of the river are called the Tideway, derived from its long tidal reach up to Teddington Lock. It rises at Thames Head
Thames Head
in Gloucestershire, and flows into the North Sea
North Sea
via the Thames Estuary
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Blackfriars Station
Blackfriars, also known as London Blackfriars, is a central London railway station and connected London Underground
London Underground
station located in the City of London. It provides local Thameslink
Thameslink
services from North to South London, and limited Southeastern commuter services to South East London and Kent. Its platforms span the River Thames, the only one in London to do so, along the length of Blackfriars Railway Bridge, a short distance downstream from Blackfriars Bridge. There are two station entrances either side of the Thames, along with a connection to the London Underground
London Underground
District and Circle lines. The main line station was opened by the London, Chatham and Dover Railway with the name St
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London Underground
The London Underground
London Underground
(also known simply as the Underground, or by its nickname the Tube) is a public rapid transit system serving London and some parts of the adjacent counties of Buckinghamshire, Essex
Essex
and Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
in the United Kingdom.[6] The Underground has its origins in the Metropolitan Railway, the world's first underground railway. Opened in 1863, it is now part of the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines; the first line to operate underground electric traction trains, the City & South London Railway in 1890, is now part of the Northern line.[7] The network has expanded to 11 lines, and in 2016–17 carried 1.379 billion passengers,[3] making it the world's 11th busiest metro system
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London Overground
London
London
Overground (also known simply as the Overground) is a suburban rail network serving London
London
and its environs. Established in 2007 to take over Silverlink
Silverlink
Metro routes,[4] it now serves a large part of the city as well as the home county of Hertfordshire, with 112 stations on nine different routes. The Overground forms part of the United Kingdom's National Rail network but it is under the franchise control and branding of Transport for London. Operation has been contracted to Arriva Rail London
London
since 2016
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Hungerford Bridge
Coordinates: 51°30′22″N 0°07′12″W / 51.50611°N 0.12000°W / 51.50611; -0.12000Hungerford BridgeHungerford Bridge and Golden Jubilee Bridges, seen from the northCoordinates 51°30′22″N 0°07′12″W / 51.506111111111°N 0.12°W / 51.506111111111; -0.12Coordinates: 51°30′22″N 0°07′12″W / 51.506111111111°N 0.12°W / 51.506111111111; -0.12Carries Railway PedestriansCrosses River ThamesLocale LondonPreceded by Westminster BridgeFollowed by Waterloo BridgeCharacteristicsDesign Steel trussHistoryOpened 1864 (Hungerford Bridge) 2002 (Golden Jubilee Bridges)Audio description of the bridges by Sophie ThompsonThe Hungerford Bridge crosses the River Thames
River Thames
in London, and lies between Waterloo Bridge
Waterloo Bridge
and Westminster Bridge
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OHLE
An overhead line or overhead wire is used to transmit electrical energy to trams, trolleybuses or trains. It is known variously as:Overhead contact system (OCS) Overhead line equipment (OLE or OHLE) Overhead equipment (OHE) Overhead wiring (OHW) or overhead lines (OHL) Catenary Trolley wire Traction wireIn this article, the generic term overhead line is used, as used by the International Union of Railways.[1] An overhead line is designed on the principle of one or more overhead wires (or rails, particularly in tunnels) situated over rail tracks, raised to a high electrical potential by connection to feeder stations at regular intervals
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25 Kv Ac
25 kV alternating current electrification is commonly used in railway electrification systems worldwide, especially for high-speed rail.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Distribution networks 4 Standardisation 5 Variations5.1 25 kV AC at 60 Hz 5.2 20 kV AC at 50/60 Hz 5.3 12.5 kV AC at 60 Hz 5.4 6.25 kV AC 5.5 50 kV AC 5.6 2 x 25 kV autotransformer system 5.7 Boosted voltage 5.8 25 kV on narrow gauge lines6 Multi-system locomotives and trains 7 See also 8 References 9 Further readingOverview[edit]A CSR EMU on the Roca Line
Roca Line
in Buenos Aires, using 25kV AC.This electrification is ideal for railways that cover long distances or carry heavy traffic
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Third Rail
A third rail is a method of providing electric power to a railway locomotive or train, through a semi-continuous rigid conductor placed alongside or between the rails of a railway track. It is used typically in a mass transit or rapid transit system, which has alignments in its own corridors, fully or almost fully segregated from the outside environment
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Direct Current
Direct current
Direct current
(DC) is the unidirectional flow of electric charge. A battery is a good example of a DC power supply. Direct current
Direct current
may flow in a conductor such as a wire, but can also flow through semiconductors, insulators, or even through a vacuum as in electron or ion beams. The electric current flows in a constant direction, distinguishing it from alternating current (AC). A term formerly used for this type of current was galvanic current.[1] The abbreviations AC and DC are often used to mean simply alternating and direct, as when they modify current or voltage.[2][3] Direct current
Direct current
may be obtained from an alternating current supply by use of a rectifier, which contains electronic elements (usually) or electromechanical elements (historically) that allow current to flow only in one direction
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Volt
The volt (symbol: V) is the derived unit for electric potential, electric potential difference (voltage), and electromotive force.[1] It is named after the Italian physicist Alessandro Volta (1745–1827).Contents1 Definition1.1 Josephson junction definition2 Water-flow analogy 3 Common voltages 4 History 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDefinition[edit] One volt is defined as the difference in electric potential between two points of a conducting wire when an electric current of one ampere dissipates one watt of power between those points.[2] It is also equal to the potential difference between two parallel, infinite planes spaced 1 meter apart that create an electric field of 1 newton per coulomb. Additionally, it is the potential difference between two points that will impart one joule of energy per coulomb of charge that passes through it
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Railway Electrification System
A railway electrification system supplies electric power to railway trains and trams without an on-board prime mover or local fuel supply. Electric railways use electric locomotives to haul passengers or freight in separate cars or electric multiple units, passenger cars with their own motors. Electricity is typically generated in large and relatively efficient generating stations, transmitted to the railway network and distributed to the trains. Some electric railways have their own dedicated generating stations and transmission lines but most purchase power from an electric utility. The railway usually provides its own distribution lines, switches and transformers. Power is supplied to moving trains with a (nearly) continuous conductor running along the track that usually takes one of two forms: overhead line, suspended from poles or towers along the track or from structure or tunnel ceilings; third rail mounted at track level and contacted by a sliding "pickup shoe"
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Standard Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t eA standard-gauge railway is a railway with a track gauge of 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in). The standard gauge is also called Stephenson gauge after George Stephenson, International gauge, UIC gauge, uniform gauge, normal gauge and European gauge in the EU and Russia.[1][2][3][4][5] It is the most widely used railway track gauge across the world with approximately 55% of the lines in the world using it. All high-speed rail lines, except those in Russia, Finland, Portugal and Uzbekistan, utilise standard gauge
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Track Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t ePart of a series onRail transportOperations Track Maintenance High-speed railways Track gauge Stations Trains Locomotives Rolling stock Companies History Attractions Terminology (AU, NA, NZ, UK) By country Accidents Railway couplings Couplers by country Coupler conversion Track gauge Variable gauge Gauge conversion Dual gauge Wheelset Bogie
Bogie
(truck) Dual coupling Rail subsidiesModellingv t eIn rail transport, track gauge is the spacing of the rails on a railway track and is measured between the inner faces of the load-bearing rails. All vehicles on a rail network must have running gear that is compatible with the track gauge, and in the earliest days of railways the selection of a proposed railway's gauge was a key issue
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British Rail Class 466
The British Rail Class 466 Networker electric multiple units were built by GEC Alsthom between 1993 and 1994, which operates with Class 465 EMUs in southeast London and Kent on the Southeastern network. It is a member of the Networker family of trains.Contents1 Description 2 Refurbishment 3 Production and numbering 4 Fleet details 5 February 2007 collision 6 References 7 External linksDescription[edit] The Class 466 EMUs were built between 1993 and 1994 by GEC Alsthom in Birmingham, for the Network SouthEast sector of British Rail.[2] They were inherited by Connex South Eastern and its successors South Eastern Trains and currently Southeastern
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British Rail Class 465
The British Rail Class 465 Networker electric multiple units were built by GEC Alsthom, and by British Rail Engineering Limited (BREL)[3] between 1991 and 1993 and then ABB Rail between 1993 and 1994
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