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South Dakota V. Bourland
South Dakota
South Dakota
v. Bourland, 508 U.S. 679 (1993), was a case in which the Supreme Court of the United States
Supreme Court of the United States
held that Congress specifically abrogated treaty rights with the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe
Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe
as to hunting and fishing rights on reservation lands that were acquired for a reservoir.[1]Contents1 Background1.1 History 1.2 Lower Courts2 Opinion of the Court2.1 Dissent3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBackground[edit] History[edit] In 1868, the Fort Laramie Treaty, 15 Stat. 635[2] was signed between the United States
United States
and the Sioux Indian Tribe
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Supreme Court Of The United States
The Supreme Court of the United States
United States
(sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[2]) is the highest federal court of the United States. Established pursuant to Article Three of the United States Constitution in 1789, it has ultimate (and largely discretionary) appellate jurisdiction over all federal courts and state court cases involving issues of federal law plus original jurisdiction over a small range of cases. In the legal system of the United States, the Supreme Court is generally the final interpreter of federal law including the United States
United States
Constitution, but it may act only within the context of a case in which it has jurisdiction
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United States Reports
The United States Reports
United States Reports
are the official record (law reports) of the rulings, orders, case tables (list of every case decided, in alphabetical order both by the name of the petitioner (the losing party in lower courts) and by the name of the respondent (the prevailing party below)), and other proceedings of the Supreme Court of the United States. United States Reports
United States Reports
are printed and bound and are the final version of court opinions and cannot be changed. Opinions of the court in each case, prepended with a headnote prepared by the Reporter of Decisions, and any concurring or dissenting opinions are published sequentially
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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List Of United States Supreme Court Cases, Volume 450
This is a list of all the United States Supreme Court cases from volume 450 of the United States Reports:HCSC-Laundry v. United States, 450 U.S. 1 (1981) (per curiam) Weaver v. Graham, 450 U.S. 24 (1981) Hudson v. Louisiana, 450 U.S. 40 (1981) Board of Governors, FRS v. Investment Company Institute, 450 U.S. 46 (1981) Carson v. American Brands, Inc., 450 U.S. 79 (1981) Steadman v. SEC, 450 U.S. 91 (1981) Democratic Party of United States v. Wisconsin ex rel. La Follette, 450 U.S. 107 (1981) INS v. Jong Ha Wang, 450 U.S. 139 (1981) (per curiam) Florida Dept. of Health and Rehabilitative Servs. v. Florida Nursing Home Assn., 450 U.S. 147 (1981) (per curiam) Commissioner v. Portland Cement Co. of Utah, 450 U.S. 156 (1981) Diamond v. Diehr, 450 U.S. 175 (1981) Schweiker v. Wilson, 450 U.S. 221 (1981) Texas Dept. of Community Affairs v. Burdine, 450 U.S. 248 (1981) Wood v. Georgia, 450 U.S. 261 (1981) Carter v. Kentucky, 450 U.S. 288 (1981) Chicago & North Western Transp. Co. v
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Montana V. United States
Montana
Montana
v. United States, 450 U.S. 544 (1981), was a Supreme Court case that addressed the Crow Nation's ability to regulate hunting and fishing on tribal lands by a non-tribal member. The case considered several important issues concerning tribes' treaty rights and sovereign governing authority on Indian reservations. The original dispute was over access to fishing on the Bighorn River
Bighorn River
within the exterior boundaries of the Crow Indian Reservation
Crow Indian Reservation
in Montana. The Court would eventually rule that the "exercise of tribal power beyond what is necessary to protect tribal self-government or to control internal relations is inconsistent with the dependent status of the tribes, and so cannot survive without express congressional delegation."[1] A prior case, Oliphant v. Suquamish Indian Tribe,[2] played a significant role in the decision
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List Of United States Supreme Court Cases, Volume 391
This is a list of all the United States Supreme Court cases from volume 391 of the United States Reports:Mathis v. United States, 391 U.S. 1 (1968) FPC v. Sunray DX Oil Co., 391 U.S. 9 (1968) Interstate Circuit, Inc. v. Dallas, 391 U.S. 53 (1968) (per curiam) Peyton v. Rowe, 391 U.S. 54 (1968) Levy v. Louisiana, 391 U.S. 68 (1968) Glona v. American Guarantee & Liability Ins. Co., 391 U.S. 73 (1968) Commissioner v. Gordon, 391 U.S. 83 (1968) Musicians v. Carroll, 391 U.S. 99 (1968) Bruton v. United States, 391 U.S. 123 (1968) Duncan v. Louisiana, 391 U.S. 145 (1968) Bloom v. Illinois, 391 U.S. 194 (1968) Dyke v. Taylor Implement Mfg. Co., 391 U.S. 216 (1968) Joint Industry Bd. of Elec. Industry v. United States, 391 U.S. 224 (1968) Carafas v. LaVallee, 391 U.S. 234 (1968) United States v. United Shoe Machinery Corp., 391 U.S. 244 (1968) First Nat. Bank of Ariz. v. Cities Service Co., 391 U.S. 253 (1968) Food Employees v. Logan Valley Plaza, Inc., 391 U.S
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Certiorari
Certiorari,[a] often abbreviated cert. in the United States, is a process for seeking judicial review and a writ issued by a court that agrees to review. A certiorari is issued by a superior court, directing an inferior court, tribunal, or other public authority to send the record of a proceeding for review.Contents1 Etymology 2 Historical and modern jurisdictions2.1 Ancient Rome 2.2 Common law
Common law
and Commonwealth 2.3 United States2.3.1 Federal courts 2.3.2 State courts 2.3.3 Administrative law2.4 Philippines3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further readingEtymology[edit] The term comes from the words used at the beginning of these writs when they were written in Latin: certiorārī (volumus) "(we wish) to be informed"
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United States Supreme Court
The Supreme Court of the United States
United States
(sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[2]) is the highest federal court of the United States. Established pursuant to Article Three of the United States Constitution in 1789, it has ultimate (and largely discretionary) appellate jurisdiction over all federal courts and state court cases involving issues of federal law plus original jurisdiction over a small range of cases. In the legal system of the United States, the Supreme Court is generally the final interpreter of federal law including the United States
United States
Constitution, but it may act only within the context of a case in which it has jurisdiction
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United States Court Of Appeals For The Eighth Circuit
The United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit
United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit
(in case citations, 8th Cir.) is a United States federal court
United States federal court
with appellate jurisdiction over the following United States district courts:Eastern District of Arkansas Western District of Arkansas Northern District of Iowa Southern District of Iowa District of Minnesota Eastern District of Missouri Western District of Missouri District of Nebraska District of North Dakota District of South DakotaThe court is composed of eleven active judges and is based at the Thomas F. Eagleton United States Courthouse in St. Louis, Missouri. It is one of thirteen United States courts of appeals
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Injunction
An injunction is an equitable remedy in the form of a court order that compels a party to do or refrain from specific acts. A party that fails to comply with an injunction faces criminal or civil penalties, including possible monetary sanctions and even imprisonment. They can also be charged with contempt of court. Counterinjunctions are injunctions that stop or reverse the enforcement of another injunction.Contents1 Rationale 2 In United States law2.1 Form2.1.1 Temporary restraining orders 2.1.2 Preliminary injunctions 2.1.3 Permanent injunctions2.2 Use 2.3 Antitrust intervention and injunctions for patent infringement3 Australian apprehended violence orders 4 UK super-injunctions 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksRationale[edit] The injunction is an equitable remedy,[1] that is, a remedy that originated in the English courts of equity
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United States District Court For The District Of South Dakota
The United States District Court for the District of South Dakota
South Dakota
(in case citations, D.S.D.) is the United States District Court or the Federal district court, whose jurisdiction for issues pertaining to federal law or diversity for the state of South Dakota. The court is based in Sioux Falls with other courthouses in Rapid City, Pierre, and Aberdeen. The district was created in 1889, when the Dakota Territory was divided into North and South Dakota. Appeals from the District of South Dakota
South Dakota
are taken to the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit (except for patent claims and claims against the U.S. government under the Tucker Act, which are appealed to the Federal Circuit). The United States Attorney's Office for the District of South Dakota, represents the United States in civil and criminal litigation in the court
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Missouri River
The Missouri
Missouri
River is the longest river in North America.[13] Rising in the Rocky Mountains
Rocky Mountains
of western Montana, the Missouri
Missouri
flows east and south for 2,341 miles (3,767 km)[9] before entering the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
north of St. Louis, Missouri. The river takes drainage from a sparsely populated, semi-arid watershed of more than half a million square miles (1,300,000 km2), which includes parts of ten U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. When combined with the lower Mississippi River, it forms the world's fourth longest river system.[13] For over 12,000 years, people have depended on the Missouri
Missouri
River and its tributaries as a source of sustenance and transportation
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Flood Control Act
In the United States, there are multiple laws known as the Flood Control Act (FCA). Typically, they are administered by the United States Army Corps of Engineers. There were several major floods between 1849 and 1936 that moved Congress to pass legislation. The first significant federal flood control laws were the Swamp Land Acts of 1849 and 1850. A flood on the Mississippi River in 1874 led to the creation of the Mississippi River Commission in 1879. Booming steamboat traffic on the Missouri River and a flood in 1881 led to the creation of the Missouri River Commission in 1884, but it was abolished by the River and Harbor Act of 1902.[1] Floods on the Mississippi, Ohio, and other rivers in the Northeast led to the Flood
Flood
Control Act of 1917, which was the first act aimed exclusively at controlling floods. The Great Mississippi Flood
Flood
of 1927 led to substantial flood control funding
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United States Congress
535 voting members100 senators 435 representatives6 non-voting membersSenate political groups     Republican (51)      Democratic (47)      Independent (2) (caucusing with Democrats)House of Representatives political groups     Republican (238)      Democratic (193)      Vacant (4)ElectionsSenate last electionNovember 8, 2016House of Representatives last electionNovember 8, 2016Meeting place United States
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Cheyenne River Indian Reservation
The Cheyenne River
Cheyenne River
Indian Reservation was created by the United States in 1889 by breaking up the Great Sioux Reservation, following its victory over the Lakota in a series of wars in the 1870s. The reservation covers almost all of Dewey and Ziebach counties in South Dakota. In addition, many small parcels of off-reservation trust land are located in Stanley, Haakon, and Meade counties. The total land area is 4,266.987 sq mi (11,051.447 km²), making it the fourth-largest Indian reservation
Indian reservation
in land area in the United States. Its largest community is unincorporated North Eagle Butte, while adjacent Eagle Butte is its largest incorporated city
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