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South Australian State Election, 2006
Mike Rann LaborElected Premier Mike Rann LaborThe state election for the 51st Parliament of South Australia
South Australia
was held in the Australian state of South Australia
South Australia
on 18 March 2006, and was conducted by the independent State Electoral Office. In the 47-seat South Australian House of Assembly, the Labor government was returned in a landslide with 28 seats from a 56.8 percent two-party-preferred vote, winning six seats which were previously Liberal, who were reduced to just 15 seats, the worst result in their history. In the 22-seat South Australian Legislative Council, the balance of power has been continuously held by the crossbench since the 1985 election
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South Australia
South Australia
Australia
(abbreviated as SA) is a state in the southern central part of Australia. It covers some of the most arid parts of the country. With a total land area of 983,482 square kilometres (379,725 sq mi), it is the fourth-largest of Australia's states and territories by area, and fifth largest by population. It has a total of 1.7 million people, and its population is the most highly centralised of any state in Australia, with more than 75 percent of South Australians
South Australians
living in the capital, Adelaide, or its environs
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Balance Of Power (parliament)
In parliamentary politics, the term balance of power may describe a parliamentary situation in which a member or a number of members of chamber are in a position by their uncommitted vote to enable a party to attain and remain in minority government, and the term may also be applied to the members who hold that position. The members holding the balance of power may guarantee their support for a government by either joining it in a coalition government or by an assurance that they will vote against any motion of no confidence in the government or abstain in such a vote. In return for such a commitment, such persons may demand legislative or policy commitments from the party they are to support
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Malapportionment
Apportionment is the process by which seats in a legislative body are distributed among administrative divisions entitled to representation.Contents1 Apportionment in theory1.1 Common problems 1.2 Apportionment by district 1.3 Apportionment by party list 1.4 Mathematics of apportionment2 Malapportionment 3 Anomalies by country3.1 Australia 3.2 Canada 3.3 Ireland 3.4 Japan 3.5 Malaysia 3.6 New Zealand 3.7 Norway 3.8 Slovakia 3.9 South Africa 3.10 Spain 3.11 United Kingdom 3.12 United States3.12.1 Senate 3.12.2 House 3.12.3 President 3.12.4 State senates 3.12.5 State legislatures 3.12.6 Prospects for change4 See also 5 References 6 External linksApportionment in theory[edit] The simplest and most universal principle is that elections should give each voter's intentions equal weight. This is both intuitive and stated in historical documents such as the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States
United States
Constitution (the Equal Protection Clause)
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Australian Labour Movement
The Australian labour movement
Australian labour movement
has its origins in the early 19th century and includes both trade unions and political activity. At its broadest, the movement encompasses an industrial wing (Australian unions) and a political wing (Australian Labor Party). Trade unions
Trade unions
in Australia may be organised (i.e., formed) on the basis of craft unionism, general unionism, or industrial unionism. Almost all unions in Australia are affiliated with the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU), many of which have undergone a significant process of amalgamations, especially in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The leadership and membership of unions hold and have at other times held a wide range of political views, including communist, socialist and right-wing views. According to ABS figures, in August 2013, there were 1.7 million members of trade unions in relation to their main job (17% of all employees)
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Trade Union
A trade union or trades union, also called a labour union (Canada) or labor union (US), is an organization of workers who have come together to achieve common goals; such as protecting the integrity of its trade, improving safety standards, and attaining better wages, benefits (such as vacation, health care, and retirement), and working conditions through the increased bargaining power wielded by the creation of a monopoly of the workers.[1] The trade union, through its leadership, bargains with the employer on behalf of union members (rank and file members) and negotiates labour contracts (collective bargaining) with employers
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Social Democratic
Social democracy
Social democracy
is a political, social and economic ideology that supports economic and social interventions to promote social justice within the framework of a liberal democratic polity and capitalist economy
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Karlene Maywald
Karlene Ann Maywald (born 26 May 1961) is an Australian National Party politician who represented the seat of Chaffey in the South Australian House of Assembly from October 1997 until March 2010. During her tenure, from 2004 until 2010, she was the Minister for the River Murray and Minister for Water Security in the Rann Labor government. She is currently the Chair of the National Water Commission and a Director of SA Water, as well as Managing Director of Maywald Consultants Pty Ltd. Political career[edit] A small businessperson before entering Parliament, Maywald was first elected to parliament at the 1997 state election on a margin of 2.6 percent. In contrast to federal politics and in some other states, the Nationals do not have a coalition agreement with the Liberal Party in South Australia. She thus sat as a crossbencher during the term of the Liberal Government, voting against the privatisation of ETSA
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Kris Hanna
Kris Hanna (born 1962) is an Australian politician, and former member for Mitchell in the South Australian House of Assembly from 1997 until 2010. Originally elected as a member of the Australian Labor Party, Hanna joined the SA Greens in 2003 before becoming an independent member in 2006. Before entering Parliament, Hanna practised law. He also served as a Councillor for the City of Marion from 1995 to 1997. He returned to practicing law in 2010 and, in 2014 was elected unopposed as Mayor of the City of Marion. Hanna is currently on the Board of Victim Support Service, and is Patron of numerous local sporting clubs. He was the longest-serving member of the Seaview High School Governing Council and had been President of Friends of Glenthorne and the Reynella Business & Tourism Association.[1] While initially elected at the 1997 and 2002 elections as a member of the Labor Party, he moved to the Greens in early 2003
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Independent (politician)
An independent or nonpartisan politician is an individual politician not affiliated with any political party
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Leader Of The Opposition (South Australia)
The Leader of the Opposition in South Australia
South Australia
is the leader of the largest minority political party or coalition of parties, known as the Opposition, in the House of Assembly of the Parliament of South Australia. By convention, he or she is generally a member of the House of Assembly. He or she acts as the public face of the opposition, and act as a chief critic of the government and ultimately attempt to portray the opposition as a feasible alternate government. They are also given certain additional rights under parliamentary standing orders, such as extended time limits for speeches. Should the opposition win an election, the Leader of the Opposition will be nominated to become the Premier of South Australia. Before the 1890s when there was no formal party system in South Australia, MPs tended to have historical liberal or conservative beliefs
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Centre-right
Centre-right politics or center-right politics (American English), also referred to as moderate-right politics, are politics that lean to the right of the left–right political spectrum, but are closer to the centre than other right-wing variants
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Majority Government
A majority government is a government formed by a governing party that has an absolute majority of seats in the legislature or parliament in a parliamentary system. This is as opposed to a minority government, where the largest party in a legislature only has a plurality of seats. A majority government is usually assured of having its legislation passed and rarely, if ever, has to fear being defeated in parliament. In contrast, a minority government must constantly bargain for support from other parties in order to pass legislation and avoid being defeated on motions of no confidence. The term "majority government" may also be used for a stable coalition of two or more parties to form an absolute majority
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Swing (Australian Politics)
The term swing refers to the extent of change in voter support, typically from one election or opinion poll to another, expressed as a positive or negative percentage point. For the Australian House of Representatives and the lower houses of the parliaments of all the states and territories except Tasmania
Tasmania
and the ACT, Australia employs preferential voting in single-member constituencies. Under the full-preference instant-runoff voting system, in each seat the candidate with the lowest vote is eliminated and their preferences are distributed, which is repeated until only two candidates remain. While every seat has a two-candidate preferred (TCP) result, seats where the major parties have come first and second are commonly referred to as having a two-party-preferred (TPP) result
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Centre-left
Centre-left politics or center-left politics (American English), also referred to as moderate-left politics, is an adherence to views leaning to the left-wing, but closer to the centre on the left–right political spectrum than other left-wing variants
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Australian Democrats
The Australian Democrats
Australian Democrats
is an Australian political party in existence since 1977. It was Australia's largest minor party from its formation in 1977 through to 2004 and frequently held the balance of power in the Senate during that time. It was formally deregistered in 2016 for not having sufficient members.[1][2] The party was formed as a merger of the Australia Party and the New Liberal Movement, both of which were descended from Liberal Party splinter groups. The party's inaugural leader was Don Chipp, a former Liberal cabinet minister, who famously promised to "keep the bastards honest". At the 1977 federal election, the Democrats polled 11.1 percent of the Senate vote and secured two seats. The party would retain a presence in the Senate for the next 30 years, at its peak (between 1999 and 2002) holding nine out of 76 seats, though never securing a seat in the lower house
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