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Some Fine Old Chestnuts
Some Fine Old Chestnuts
Some Fine Old Chestnuts
was Bing Crosby's second studio album for Decca Records, recorded and released as a 10" LP in 1954.[1] The 1954 edition of Some Fine Old Chestnuts
Some Fine Old Chestnuts
featured eight standards mastered on June 26, 1953, from tracks recorded for Crosby's weekly CBS radio show with a trio led by Crosby's regular pianist Buddy Cole. Crosby's 1957 Decca LP New Tricks also features songs recorded for radio accompanied by Cole. Decca later expanded Some Fine Old Chestnuts
Some Fine Old Chestnuts
into a 12" LP by adding four more tracks that were recorded in 1954 and 1955: "In a Little Spanish Town," "Honeysuckle Rose," "Ol' Man River" and "Swanee". [2] The 8-track was issued on CD in 1993 by MCA Records
MCA Records
in Japan
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Album
An album is a collection of audio recordings issued as a single item on CD, record, audio tape or another medium. Albums of recorded music were developed in the early 20th century, first as books of individual 78rpm records, then from 1948 as vinyl LP records played at ​33 1⁄3 rpm. Vinyl LPs are still issued, though in the 21st-century album sales have mostly focused on compact disc (CD) and MP3
MP3
formats. However, vinyl sales have been on the rise in recent years.[1] The audio cassette was a format used alongside vinyl from the 1970s into the first decade of the 2000s. An album may be recorded in a recording studio (fixed or mobile), in a concert venue, at home, in the field, or a mix of places. The time frame for completely recording an album varies between a few hours and several years. This process usually requires several takes with different parts recorded separately, and then brought or "mixed" together
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Raymond B. Egan
Raymond Blanning Egan (November 14, 1890 – October 13, 1952) was a songwriter. Egan was born in Windsor, Ontario. He moved to the United States in 1892 and settled in Michigan
Michigan
where he attended the University of Michigan. His first job was a bank clerk, but he soon moved on to be a staff writer for Ginnells Music Co. in Detroit. He wrote songs for Broadway acts such as Robinson Crusoe, Jr., Silks and Satins, Holka Polka and Earl Carroll’s Sketch Book of 1935. He also wrote a number of songs for films such as Paramount on Parade, Red-Headed Woman, and The Prizefighter and the Lady. He later went on to writing songs with Walter Donaldson, Ted Fiorito, Harry Tierney, Richard A. Whiting. and Gus Kahn. Wikisource
Wikisource
has original works written by or about: Raymond B. EganSome of his songs are:"Coaling Up in Colon Town" (1916). m: Richard A. Whiting[1] "Bravest Heart of All" (1917). m: Richard A
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Ted Fio Rito
Theodore Salvatore Fiorito (December 20, 1900 – July 22, 1971),[1] known professionally as Ted Fio Rito, was an American composer, orchestra leader, and keyboardist, on both the piano and the Hammond organ, who was popular on national radio broadcasts in the 1920s and 1930s. His name is sometimes given as Ted Fiorito or Ted FioRito.Contents1 Biography 2 Radio remotes2.1 Radio in the 1930s3 Motion picture career 4 References in popular culture 5 Chart successes 6 Other songs and recordings 7 References 8 Listen to 9 External linksBiography[edit]Fio Rito on the air with Clara, Lu, and Em, 1936. He led his band while playing the piano.He was born Teodorico Salvatore Fiorito in Newark, New Jersey
Newark, New Jersey
to an Italian immigrant couple, tailor Louis (Luigi) Fiorito and Eugenia Cantalupo Fiorito, when they were both 21 years old; and he was delivered by a midwife at their 293 15th Avenue residence
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Gus Kahn
Gustav Gerson Kahn (November 6, 1886 – October 8, 1941) was an American lyricist.Contents1 Biography 2 Death & Legacy 3 Selected songs 4 Further reading 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Kahn was born in Koblenz, Germany, in 1886. The Jewish family emigrated to the United States and moved to Chicago
Chicago
in 1890. After graduating from high school, he worked as a clerk in a mail order business before launching one of the most successful and prolific careers from Tin Pan Alley. Kahn married Grace LeBoy in 1916 and they had two children, Donald and Irene. In his early days, Kahn wrote special material for vaudeville. In 1913 he began a productive partnership with the well-established composer Egbert Van Alstyne, with whom he created several notable hits of the era, including "Memories" and, along with Tony Jackson, "Pretty Baby." Later, he began writing lyrics for composer and bandleader Isham Jones
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Buddy DeSylva
George Gard "Buddy" DeSylva (January 27, 1895 – July 11, 1950) was an American songwriter, film producer and record executive. He wrote or co-wrote many popular songs and along with Johnny Mercer
Johnny Mercer
and Glenn Wallichs, he founded Capitol Records.Contents1 Biography 2 Individual songs 3 Broadway credits 4 Selected filmography 5 In popular culture 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit] DeSylva was born in New York City, but grew up in California
California
and attended the University of Southern California, where he joined the Theta Xi
Theta Xi
Fraternity. His father, Aloysius J. De Sylva, was better known to American audiences as the Portuguese-born actor, Hal De Forrest.[1] His mother, Georgetta Miles Gard, was the daughter of Los Angeles police chief, George E
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Ballard MacDonald
Ballard MacDonald (October 15, 1882 – November 17, 1935) was an American lyricist, who was a part of Tin Pan Alley. Born in Portland, Oregon, he was a charter member of the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP). MacDonald wrote lyrics for a song called "Play That Barber-Shop Chord" in 1910, which became a hit with revised lyrics when it was sung in The Ziegfeld Follies by vaudeville star Bert Williams.[1] He subsequently worked with composer Harry Carroll
Harry Carroll
on "On the Mississippi" (1912) and "The Trail of the Lonesome Pine" (1912, based on the million-selling novel). He also partnered with James F. Hanley, which produced the 1917 hit "(Back Home Again In) Indiana.[1] In the early '20s, MacDonald turned his attention to Broadway revues, which in 1924 brought him his most notable musical collaborator in George Gershwin
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Henry Creamer
Henry Sterling Creamer (June 21, 1879 – October 14, 1930) was a Black American
Black American
popular song lyricist. He was born in Richmond, Virginia and died in New York. He co-wrote many popular songs in the years from 1900 to 1929, often collaborating with Turner Layton, with whom he also appeared in vaudeville.Contents1 Career 2 Some notable works 3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] Henry Creamer
Henry Creamer
was a singer, dancer, songwriter and stage producer/director.[1][2] He first performed on the vaudeville circuit in the U.S. and in Europe as a duo with pianist Turner Layton, with whom he also co-wrote songs
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Turner Layton
Turner Layton
Turner Layton
(July 2, 1894 – February 6, 1978), born John Turner Layton, Jr., was an African-American songwriter, singer and pianist. He frequently worked with Henry Creamer.Contents1 Life 2 Recordings 3 Legacy 4 Notable compositions 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Born in Washington, D.C., in 1894, he was the son of John Turner Layton, "a bass singer, music educator and hymn composer."[1] After receiving a musical education from his father, he attended the Howard University Dental School, later coming to New York City
New York City
in the early 1900s, where he met future songwriting partner, lyricist Henry Creamer. Layton is best known for his many compositions with Creamer, the best known of which is the standard "After You've Gone", written in 1918[2] and first popularized by Sophie Tucker
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Richard A. Whiting
Richard Armstrong Whiting (November 12, 1891 – February 19, 1938)[1] was an American composer of popular songs, including the standards "Hooray for Hollywood", "Ain't We Got Fun?" and "On the Good Ship Lollipop". He also wrote lyrics occasionally, and film scores most notably for the standard "She's Funny That Way". He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1936 for "When Did You Leave Heaven" from the movie Sing, Baby Sing.Contents1 Biography 2 Film scores 3 Broadway show scores 4 Selected songs4.1 Free for All5 Hit songs 6 Notable Recordings 7 Modern Day Usage 8 References 9 External linksBiography[edit] Richard Whiting was born in Peoria, Illinois, into a musical family. His father, Frank Whiting, was a real estate agent and gifted violinist; his mother Blossom was a piano teacher. Together they instilled a love of music in their son and worked towards nurturing his natural gift of piano playing
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Earl Burtnett
Earl Burtnett (7 February 1896 – 2 January 1936)[1] was an American bandleader, songwriter and pianist who was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.Contents1 Life and career 2 Death 3 References 4 External linksLife and career[edit] Burtnett was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He attended Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State College but left after two years. He began having songs published, including "Canadian Capers" (1915) and "Down Honolulu Way" (1916), and in 1918 joined Art Hickman's touring band
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Harry Akst
Harry Akst (August 15, 1894 – March 31, 1963)[1] was an American songwriter, who started out his career as a pianist in vaudeville accompanying singers such as Nora Bayes, Frank Fay and Al Jolson.[2]Contents1 Life and career 2 Filmography 3 Selected songs 4 Original works for Broadway 5 Other Broadway credits 6 References 7 External linksLife and career[edit] Akst was born in New York, United States. For four years, he worked for Bayes. Then in 1916, he enlisted in the army and was at Camp Upton
Camp Upton
when he met Irving Berlin
Irving Berlin
(in 1921 they would write "Home Again Blues").[3] His most notable success came with the song he wrote in 1925 with Sam M. Lewis and Joe Young: "Dinah"
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Sam M. Lewis
Sam M. Lewis (October 25, 1885 – November 22, 1959) was an American singer and lyricist.Contents1 Career 2 Selected works 3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] Lewis was born Samuel M. Levine in New York City. He began his music career by singing in cafés throughout New York City, and began writing songs in 1912. He wrote numerous songs, and collaborated with other songwriters, most frequently with Joe Young, but also with Fred Ahlert, Walter Donaldson, Bert Grant, Harry Warren, Jean Schwartz, Ted Fiorito, J. Fred Coots, Ray Henderson, Victor Young, Peter DeRose, Harry Akst, and Maurice Abrahams.[1] He also contributed to the Broadway musical The Laugh Parade, and Hollywood musicals such as Squibs Wins the Calcutta Sweep, The Singing Fool, Wolf Song, and Spring is Here. His songs have been used in more modern movies, such as Big Fish
Big Fish
and The Pelican Brief
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Joe Young (lyricist)
Young
Young
may refer to:Offspring, the product of reproduction of a new organism produced by one or more parents Youth, the time of life when one is young, often meaning the time between childhood and adulthoodContents1 Music 2 People2.1 Surname 2.2 Given name 2.3 Nickname3 Places3.1 Australia 3.2 United States 3.3 Elsewhere4 Other uses 5 See alsoMusic[edit]"Young" (Hollywood Undead song), a 2009 song by Hollywood Undead from the album Swan Songs "Young" (Kenny Chesney song), a 2002 single by American country music singer Kenny Chesney "Young" (Tulisa song), a 2012 song by British singer Tulisa
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Dorothy Fields
Dorothy Fields
Dorothy Fields
(July 15, 1905 – March 28, 1974) was an American librettist and lyricist. She wrote over 400 songs for Broadway musicals and films. Her best-known pieces include "The Way You Look Tonight", "A Fine Romance", "On the Sunny Side of the Street", "Don't Blame Me", "Pick Yourself Up", "I'm in the Mood for Love" and "You Couldn't Be Cuter" Throughout her career, she collaborated with various influential figures in the American musical theater, including Jerome Kern, Cy Coleman, Irving Berlin, and Jimmy McHugh
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Jimmy McHugh
James Francis McHugh (July 10, 1894 – May 23, 1969) was an American composer. One of the most prolific songwriters from the 1920s to the 1950s, he is credited with over 500 songs. His songs were recorded by such artists as Chet Baker, June Christy, Bing Crosby, Deanna Durbin, Ella Fitzgerald, Judy Garland, Adelaide Hall, Billie Holiday, Bill Kenny, Peggy Lee, Carmen Miranda, Nina Simone, and Dinah Washington.Contents1 Career 2 Works 3 Notes and references3.1 Bibliography4 External linksCareer[edit] McHugh began his career in Boston, where he published about a dozen songs with local publishers. His first success was with the World War I song "Keep the Love-Light Burning in the Window Till the Boys Come Marching Home", and this also came near the start of a decade-long collaboration with lyricist Jack Caddigan
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