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Soko 522
The Soko 522
Soko 522
was a two-seater Yugoslav military training and light attack aircraft produced in the 1950s by SOKO, in the former Yugoslavia.Contents1 History 2 Existing aircraft 3 Former military operators 4 Aircraft On Display 5 Specifications (Soko 522) 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The Soko 522
Soko 522
was designed by Yugoslav engineers Šostarić, Marjanović and Čurčić at the Ikarus Aircraft Factory
Ikarus Aircraft Factory
in Zemun. The first prototype flew in February 1955. After the initial success of the new aircraft, production was transferred to the Soko aircraft factory in Mostar. Production lasted until 1961 and totalled 110 units. It was used as the primary trainer aircraft for the Yugoslav air force until it was retired in 1978. It gained some fame for its role in war movies filmed in Yugoslavia during the 1960s and 1970s, where it was used to portray the Fw 190 German fighter
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Wingspan
The wingspan (or just span) of a bird or an airplane is the distance from one wingtip to the other wingtip. For example, the Boeing
Boeing
777-200 has a wingspan of 60.93 metres (199 ft 11 in),[1] and a wandering albatross (Diomedea exulans) caught in 1965 had a wingspan of 3.63 metres (11 ft 11 in), the official record for a living bird. The term wingspan, more technically extent, is also used for other winged animals such as pterosaurs, bats, insects, etc., and other fixed-wing aircraft such as ornithopters
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Yugoslav Air Force
The Air Force
Air Force
and Air Defence (Serbo-Croatian: Ratno vazduhoplovstvo i protivvazdušna odbrana / Ратно ваздухопловство и противваздушна одбрана; abbr. RV i PVO / РВ и ПВО), was one of three branches of the Yugoslav People's Army, the Yugoslav military. Commonly referred-to as the Yugoslav Air Force, at its height it was among the largest in Europe
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SFR Yugoslav Air Force
The Air Force
Air Force
and Air Defence (Serbo-Croatian: Ratno vazduhoplovstvo i protivvazdušna odbrana / Ратно ваздухопловство и противваздушна одбрана; abbr. RV i PVO / РВ и ПВО), was one of three branches of the Yugoslav People's Army, the Yugoslav military. Commonly referred-to as the Yugoslav Air Force, at its height it was among the largest in Europe
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Gate Guard
A gate guardian or gate guard is a withdrawn piece of equipment, often an aircraft, armoured vehicle, artillery piece, or locomotive, mounted on a plinth and used as a static display near to and forming a symbolic display of "guarding" the main entrance to a site, especially a military base.[1][2] Commonly, gate guardians outside airbases are decommissioned examples of aircraft that were once based there, or still are.[citation needed]Contents1 Examples1.1 Australia 1.2 Colombia 1.3 South Africa 1.4 Switzerland 1.5 United Kingdom 1.6 United States of America2 Images 3 See also 4 ReferencesExamples[edit] Examples of gate guardians include the following: Australia[edit] In Australia, gate guards are also often found outside Returned and Services League of Australia (RSL) clubs.[citation needed] Colombia[edit]Mounted atop the entrance gate to Pablo Escobar's ranch, Hacienda Nápoles in Puerto Triunfo, Antioquia (320 km (200 mi) NW of Bog
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Mostar Airport
Mostar International Airport (Bosnian: Međunarodni aerodrom Mostar/Међународни аеродром Мостар) is an airport near Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina, situated in the village of Ortiješ, 4 NM (7.4 km; 4.6 mi) southeast of Mostar's railway station.[2]Contents1 History 2 Airlines and destinations 3 Statistics 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Mostar Airport was opened for civilian air traffic in 1965 for domestic flights. Prior to 1965, Mostar was a local airport with a large concrete runway used by aircraft manufacturer SOKO for testing and delivering military aircraft, and sometimes by passenger aircraft.[citation needed] Currently, the airport primarily serves for Catholics making the pilgrimage to nearby Međugorje
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Belgrade
Belgrader (en) Beograđanin (sr)Time zone CET (UTC+1) • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)Postal code 11000Area code(s) +381(0)11 ISO 3166 code RS-00Car plates BGWebsite www.beograd.rs Belgrade
Belgrade
(/ˈbɛlɡreɪd/ BEL-grayd; Serbian: Beograd / Београд, meaning "White city", Serbian pronunciation: [beǒɡrad] ( listen); names in other languages) is the capital and largest city of Serbia. It is located at the confluence of the Sava
Sava
and Danube
Danube
rivers, where the Pannonian Plain meets the Balkans.[6] The urban area of the City of Belgrade
Belgrade
has a population of 1.23 million, while nearly 1.7 million people live within its administrative limits.[5] One of the most important prehistoric cultures of Europe, the Vinča culture, evolved within the Belgrade
Belgrade
area in the 6th millennium BC
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Pratt & Whitney R-1340
The Pratt & Whitney R-1340 Wasp was an aircraft engine of the reciprocating type that was widely used in American aircraft from the 1920s onward. It was the Pratt & Whitney aircraft company's first engine, and the first of the famed Wasp series.[1] It was a single-row, nine-cylinder, air-cooled, radial design, and displaced 1,344 cubic inches (22 L); bore and stroke were both 5.75 in (146 mm)
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Air-cooled
Air-cooled engines rely on the circulation of air directly over hot parts of the engine to cool them.A cylinder from an air-cooled aviation engine, a Continental C85. Notice the rows of fins on both the steel cylinder barrel and the aluminum cylinder head. The fins provide additional surface area for air to pass over the cylinder and absorb heat.Contents1 Introduction 2 Applications2.1 Road vehicles 2.2 Aviation 2.3 Diesel engines 2.4 Stationary or portable engines3 References 4 Bibliography4.1 Cited sources 4.2 Further readingIntroduction[edit] Most modern internal combustion engines are cooled by a closed circuit carrying liquid coolant through channels in the engine block and cylinder head, where the coolant absorbs heat, to a heat exchanger or radiator where the coolant releases heat into the air (or raw water, in the case of marine engines)
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Range (aeronautics)
The maximal total range is the maximum distance an aircraft can fly between takeoff and landing, as limited by fuel capacity in powered aircraft, or cross-country speed and environmental conditions in unpowered aircraft. The range can be seen as the cross-country ground speed multiplied by the maximum time in the air. The fuel time limit for powered aircraft is fixed by the fuel load and rate of consumption. When all fuel is consumed, the engines stop and the aircraft will lose its propulsion. Ferry range means the maximum range the aircraft can fly. This usually means maximum fuel load, optionally with extra fuel tanks and minimum equipment. It refers to transport of aircraft without any passengers or cargo. Combat range is the maximum range the aircraft can fly when carrying ordnance
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Rogožarski SIM-VIII
Ikarus- Zemun
Zemun
(Ikarus)Designer Sima MilutinovićFirst flight 1931Introduction 1931Retired 1941Primary users Yugoslav Royal Air Force YU-AeroclubProduced from 1931 to 1933Number built 5 (3 at Rogožarski, 2 at Ikarus)Developed from Rogožarski
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Ceiling (aeronautics)
With respect to aircraft performance, a ceiling is the maximum density altitude an aircraft can reach under a set of conditions, as determined by its flight envelope.Contents1 Service ceiling 2 Absolute ceiling 3 See also 4 ReferencesService ceiling[edit] Service ceiling is where the rate of climb drops below a prescribed value. The service ceiling is the maximum usable altitude of an aircraft. Specifically, it is the density altitude at which flying in a clean configuration, at the best rate of climb airspeed for that altitude and with all engines operating and producing maximum continuous power, will produce a given rate of climb (a typical value might be 100 feet per minute climb or 30 metres per minute,[1] or on the order of 500 feet per minute climb for jet aircraft)
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John W. R. Taylor
John William Ransom Taylor, OBE Hon DEng FRAeS FRHistS AFIAA,[1] (8 June 1922 – 12 December 1999[2]) was a British aviation expert and editor. He edited Jane's All the World's Aircraft for three decades during the Cold War. He retired as editor in 1989, just as the Iron Curtain obscuring the Soviet Bloc's technology started to lift. Taylor, who lived to the age of 77, was a master of a parallel art to Kremlinology, he could deduce the performance of Soviet military equipment from blurred photographs. "Thus in 1961, when Western intelligence was fascinated by early glimpses of a new Soviet bomber, the Tupolev Tu-22, many analysts estimated it could reach a speed of Mach 2.5 - more than twice the speed of sound. But Taylor, after noting the shape of the aircraft's engine intakes, put the maximum at no more than Mach 1.4, which proved much closer to the truth
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Belly Landing
A belly landing, pancake landing or gear-up landing occurs when an aircraft lands without its landing gear fully extended and uses its underside, or belly, as its primary landing device. Normally the term gear-up landing refers to incidents in which the pilot forgets to extend the landing gear, while belly landing refers to incidents where a mechanical malfunction prevents the pilot from extending the landing gear. During a belly landing, there is normally extensive damage to the airplane. Belly landings carry the risk that the aircraft may flip over, disintegrate, or catch fire if it lands too fast or too hard. Extreme precision is needed to ensure that the plane lands as straight and level as possible while maintaining enough airspeed to maintain control. Strong crosswinds, low visibility, damage to the airplane, or unresponsive instruments or controls greatly increase the danger of performing a belly landing
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Aircraft Engine
An aircraft engine is the component of the propulsion system for an aircraft that generates mechanical power
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