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Sohn Kee-chung
Sohn Kee-chung
Sohn Kee-chung
(Korean: 손기정; August 29, 1912[1][2] – November 15, 2002) was a Korean athlete and long-distance runner. He became the first Korean to medal at the Olympic Games, winning gold in the marathon at the 1936 Berlin Olympics
Berlin Olympics
as a member of the Japanese delegation.[3] Sohn competed under the Japanese name Son Kitei, as Korea was under the colonial rule of the Japanese Empire
Japanese Empire
during his career.[3]Contents1 Early life 2 Athletics career 3 1936 Berlin Olympics3.1 Political significance 3.2 Hellenic prize4 Later life 5 Death and legacy 6 In popular culture6.1 Actors who played Sohn Kee-chung7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Sohn Kee-chung
Sohn Kee-chung
was born in what is now Sinuiju, North P'yŏngan Province, North Korea, which was occupied by Japan
Japan
at the time
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Korean Name
A Korean name
Korean name
consists of a family name followed by a given name, as used by the Korean people
Korean people
in both South Korea
South Korea
and North Korea. In the Korean language, ireum or seongmyeong usually refers to the family name (seong) and given name (ireum in a narrow sense) together. Traditional Korean family names typically consist of only one syllable. There is no middle name in the English language sense. Many Koreans have their given names made of a generational name syllable and an individually distinct syllable, though this practice is declining in the younger generations. The generational name syllable is shared by siblings in North Korea, and by all members of the same generation of an extended family in South Korea. Married men and women usually keep their full personal names, and children inherit the father's family name. The family names are subdivided into bon-gwan (clans), i.e
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The Dong-a Ilbo
The Dong-A Ilbo (Hangul: 동아일보; Hanja: 東亞日報, literally East Asia Daily) is a newspaper in Korea since 1920 with daily circulation of more than 1.2 million and opinion leaders as its main readers. The Dong-A Ilbo is the parent company of Dong-A Media Group (DAMG), which is composed of 11 affiliates including Sports Dong-A, Dong-A Science, DUNet, and dongA.com, as well as Channel A, general service cable broadcasting company launched in December 1, 2011. It covers variety of areas including news, drama, entertainment, sports, education, and movies 24 hours a day. The Dong-A Ilbo has partnered with international news companies such as The New York Times of the United States of America, The Asahi Shimbun of Japan and The People's Daily
People's Daily
of China. It has correspondents stationed in five major cities worldwide including Washington D.C., New York, Beijing, Tokyo and Paris
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List Of Korean Family Names
This is a list of Korean family names, in Hangul
Hangul
alphabetical order. Note: (S) denotes South Korea. (N) denotes North Korea. The most common Korean family name (particularly in South Korea) is Kim, followed by Lee and Park. These three family names are held by around half of the ethnic Korean population
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Tokyo
Tokyo
Tokyo
(/ˈtoʊkioʊ/, Japanese: [toːkʲoː] ( listen)), officially Tokyo Metropolis,[6] is the capital city of Japan
Japan
and one of its 47 prefectures.[7] The Greater Tokyo Area
Greater Tokyo Area
is the most populous metropolitan area in the world.[8] It is the seat of the Emperor of Japan
Japan
and the Japanese government. Tokyo
Tokyo
is in the Kantō region
Kantō region
on the southeastern side of the main island Honshu
Honshu
and includes the Izu Islands and Ogasawara Islands.[9] Formerly known as Edo, it has been the de facto seat of government since 1603 when Shōgun
Shōgun
Tokugawa Ieyasu made the city his headquarters
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International Association Of Athletics Federations
The International Association of Athletics Federations
International Association of Athletics Federations
(IAAF) is the international governing body for the sport of athletics. It was founded on 17 July 1912 as the International Amateur Athletic Federation by representatives from 17 national athletics federations at the organization's first congress in Stockholm, Sweden. Since October 1993, it has been headquartered in Monaco. Beginning in 1982, the IAAF
IAAF
passed several amendments to its rules to allow athletes to receive compensation for participating in international competitions. However, the organization retained the word amateur in its name until its 2001 congress, at which it changed its name to the International Association of Athletics Federations. The IAAF's president is Sebastian Coe
Sebastian Coe
of the United Kingdom
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Boston Marathon
The Boston Marathon
Marathon
is an annual marathon hosted by several cities in greater Boston in eastern Massachusetts, United States. It is always held on Patriots' Day, the third Monday of April. Begun in 1897, inspired by the success of the first marathon competition in the 1896 Summer Olympics,[1] the Boston Marathon
Marathon
is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. It is one of six World Marathon
Marathon
Majors, and is one of five major events held in the United States through the years of both World Wars (the Kentucky Derby, Penn Relays, Rose Parade, and Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show are the others). Since 1897, the Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) has organized this event,[2] and it has been managed by DMSE Sports, Inc.[3] since 1988
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Empire Of Japan
The Empire of Japan
Japan
(大日本帝國, Dai Nippon Teikoku, literally meaning "Great Japanese Empire")[9] was the historical nation-state[nb 2] and great power that existed from the Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
in 1868 to the enactment of the 1947 constitution of modern Japan.[1] Japan's rapid industrialization and militarization under the slogan Fukoku Kyōhei (富國強兵, "Enrich the Country, Strengthen the Armed Forces") led to its emergence as a world power and the establishment of a colonial empire
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Gold Medal
A gold medal is a medal awarded for highest achievement in a non-military field. Its name derives from the use of at least a fraction of gold in form of plating or alloying in its manufacture. Since the eighteenth century, gold medals have been awarded in the arts, for example, by the Royal Danish Academy, usually as a symbol of an award to give an outstanding student some financial freedom. Others offer only the prestige of the award. Many organizations now award gold medals either annually or extraordinarily, including UNESCO
UNESCO
and various academic societies. While some gold medals are solid gold, others are gold-plated or silver-gilt, like those of the Olympic Games, the Lorentz Medal, the United States Congressional Gold
Gold
Medal
Medal
and the Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
medal. Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
medals consist of 18 karat green gold plated with 24 karat gold
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Bronze Medal
A bronze medal in sports and other similar areas involving competition is a medal made of bronze awarded to the third-place finisher of contests or competitions such as the Olympic Games, Commonwealth Games, etc. The outright winner receives a gold medal and the second place a silver medal. More generally, bronze is traditionally the most common metal used for all types of high-quality medals, including artistic ones. The practice of awarding bronze third place medals began at the 1904 Olympic Games
Olympic Games
in St. Louis, Missouri, prior to which only first and second places were awarded.Contents1 Olympic Games 2 Psychological study 3 See also 4 External links 5 ReferencesOlympic Games[edit] Main article: Olympic medal Minting Olympic medals is the responsibility of the host city
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International Olympic Committee
Coordinates: 46°31′5″N 6°35′49″E / 46.51806°N 6.59694°E / 46.51806; 6.59694International Olympic Committee Comité International OlympiqueMotto Citius, Altius, Fortius (Latin: Faster, higher, stronger)Formation 23 June 1894; 123 years ago (1894-06-23)Type Sports federationHeadquarters Lausanne, SwitzerlandMembership105 active members, 32 honorary members, 2 honour members (Senegal and United States)Official languageFrench (reference language), EnglishHonorary PresidentJacques Rogge[1]President Thomas Bach
Thomas Bach
[1]Vice PresidentsYu Zaiqing J.A
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Flag Of Japan
The national flag of Japan
Japan
is a rectangular white banner bearing a crimson-red disc at its center. This flag is officially called Nisshōki (日章旗, the "sun-mark flag"), but is more commonly known in Japan
Japan
as Hi no maru (日の丸, the "circle of the sun"). It embodies the country's sobriquet: Land of the Rising Sun. The Nisshōki flag is designated as the national flag in the Law Regarding the National Flag and National Anthem, which was promulgated and became effective on August 13, 1999. Although no earlier legislation had specified a national flag, the sun-disc flag had already become the de facto national flag of Japan. Two proclamations issued in 1870 by the Daijō-kan, the governmental body of the early Meiji period, each had a provision for a design of the national flag. A sun-disc flag was adopted as the national flag for merchant ships under Proclamation No
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Provinces Of Korea
Korea's provinces (Do ; hangul: 도; hanja: 道) have been the primary administrative division of Korea since the mid Goryeo dynasty in the early 11th century, and were preceded by provincial-level divisions (Ju and Mok) dating back to Unified Silla, in the late 7th century. During the Unified Silla Period (AD 668–935), Korea was divided into nine Ju (주; 州), an old word for "province" that was used to name both the kingdom's provinces and its provincial capitals. After Goryeo defeated Silla and Later Baekje in 935 and 936 respectively, the new kingdom "was divided into one royal district (Ginae; 기내; 畿內) and twelve administrative districts (Mok; 목; 牧)" (Nahm 1988), which were soon redivided into ten provinces (Do). In 1009 the country was again redivided, this time into one royal district, five provinces (Do) and two frontier districts (Gye; 계; 界?). After the Joseon Dynasty's rise to power and the formation of Joseon in 1392, the country was redivided into eig
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Minami Jiro
Jirō Minami (南 次郎, Minami Jirō, 10 August 1874 – 5 December 1955) was a general in the Imperial Japanese Army and Governor-General of Korea between 1936 and 1942. He was convicted of war crimes and sentenced to life imprisonment.Contents1 Life and military career 2 References2.1 Books3 External links 4 NotesLife and military career[edit] Born to an ex-samurai family in Hiji, Ōita Prefecture, Minami came to Tokyo as a boarding student, and was eventually accepted into the Imperial Japanese Army Academy. After graduating from the academy in February 1895, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the cavalry in May. He was promoted to lieutenant in October 1897 and to captain in November 1900. Minami served in the Russo-Japanese War as a member of the headquarters staff and as a company commander in the 1st Cavalry Regiment, where he participated in the Siege of Port Arthur. He was promoted to major in March 1905 and to lieutenant colonel in February 1910
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Kempetai
The Kenpeitai (憲兵隊, "Military Police Corps") /kɛmpeɪˈtaɪ/ was the military police arm of the Imperial Japanese Army from 1881 to 1945. It was both a conventional military police and a secret police force. While it was institutionally part of the Imperial Japanese Army, it also discharged the functions of the military police for the Imperial Japanese Navy under the direction of the Admiralty Minister (although the IJN had its own much smaller Tokkeitai), those of the executive police under the direction of the Interior Minister, and those of the judicial police under the direction of the Justice Minister. A member of the corps was called a kenpei.[1]Contents1 History 2 Axis 3 Human rights abuses 4 Organization 5 Wartime mission 6 Uniform 7 Other intelligence sections 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]Kenpeitai searching captured Chinese soldiers after the Fall of NankingDoolittle Raider U.S. Army Air Force Lt. Robert L
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Corinthian Helmet
The Corinthian helmet
Corinthian helmet
originated in ancient Greece and took its name from the city-state of Corinth. It was a helmet made of bronze which in its later styles covered the entire head and neck, with slits for the eyes and mouth. A large curved projection protected the nape of the neck. Out of combat, a Greek hoplite would wear the helmet tipped upward for comfort. This practice gave rise to a series of variant forms in Italy, where the slits were almost closed, since the helmet was no longer pulled over the face but worn cap-like
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