HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Sodium Nitroprusside
Sodium nitroprusside
Sodium nitroprusside
(SNP), sold under the brand name Nitropress among others, is a medication used to lower blood pressure.[1] This may be done if the blood pressure is very high and resulting in symptoms, in certain types of heart failure, and during surgery to decrease bleeding.[1] It is used by continuous injection into a vein.[1] Onset is typically immediate and effects last for up to ten minutes.[1] Common side effects include low blood pressure and cyanide toxicity.[1] Other serious side effects include methemoglobinemia.[1] It is not general
[...More...]

"Sodium Nitroprusside" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

American Society Of Health-System Pharmacists
The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists
Pharmacists
(ASHP) is a professional organization representing the interests of pharmacists who practice in hospitals, health maintenance organizations, long-term care facilities, home care, and other components of health care. Previously it was known as the American Society of Hospital Pharmacists. As of 2018[update], ASHP has 45,000 members and a staff of more than 200.Contents1 History 2 Aim 3 Publications 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] By 1939 a subsection of hospital pharmacists was formed in the American Pharmaceutical Association (APhA), and for the first time, hospital pharmacists had a voice in a national organization. In 1942, hospital pharmacists established the American Society of Hospital Pharmacists, affiliated with APhA
[...More...]

"American Society Of Health-System Pharmacists" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Health System
A health system, also sometimes referred to as health care system or as healthcare system, is the organization of people, institutions, and resources that deliver health care services to meet the health needs of target populations. There is a wide variety of health systems around the world, with as many histories and organizational structures as there are nations. Implicitly, nations must design and develop health systems in accordance with their needs and resources, although common elements in virtually all health systems are primary healthcare and public health measures.[1] In some countries, health system planning is distributed among market participants. In others, there is a concerted effort among governments, trade unions, charities, religious organizations, or other co-ordinated bodies to deliver planned health care services targeted to the populations they serve
[...More...]

"Health System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Chemical Identifier
The IUPAC
IUPAC
International Chemical Identifier
Identifier
(InChI /ˈɪntʃiː/ IN-chee or /ˈɪŋkiː/ ING-kee) is a textual identifier for chemical substances, designed to provide a standard way to encode molecular information and to facilitate the search for such information in databases and on the web
[...More...]

"International Chemical Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Blood Pressure
Blood
Blood
pressure (BP) is the pressure of circulating blood on the walls of blood vessels. Used without further specification, "blood pressure" usually refers to the pressure in large arteries of the systemic circulation. Blood
Blood
pressure is usually expressed in terms of the systolic pressure (maximum during one heart beat) over diastolic pressure (minimum in between two heart beats) and is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg), above the surrounding atmospheric pressure (considered to be zero for convenience). Blood
Blood
pressure is one of the vital signs, along with respiratory rate, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and body temperature
[...More...]

"Blood Pressure" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Heart Failure
Heart
Heart
failure (HF), often referred to as congestive heart failure (CHF), is when the heart is unable to pump sufficiently to maintain blood flow to meet the body's needs.[9][10][11] Signs and symptoms commonly include shortness of breath, excessive tiredness, and leg swelling.[2] The shortness of breath is usually worse with exercise, while lying down, and may wake the person at night.[2] A limited ability to exercise is also a common feature.[12] Chest pain, including angina, does not typically occur due to heart failure.[13] Common causes of heart failure include coronary artery disease including a previous myocardial infarction (heart attack), h
[...More...]

"Heart Failure" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bleeding
Bleeding, also known as hemorrhaging or haemorrhaging, is blood escaping from the circulatory system.[1] Bleeding
Bleeding
can occur internally, where blood leaks from blood vessels inside the body, or externally, either through a natural opening such as the mouth, nose, ear, urethra, vagina or anus, or through a break in the skin. Hypovolemia is a massive decrease in blood volume, and death by excessive loss of blood is referred to as exsanguination.[2] Typically, a healthy person can endure a loss of 10–15% of the total blood volume without serious medical difficulties (by comparison, blood donation typically takes 8–10% of the donor's blood volume).[3] The stopping or controlling of bleeding is called hemostasis and is an important part of both first aid and surgery. The use of cyanoacrylate glue to prevent bleeding and seal battle wounds was designed and first used in the Vietnam War
[...More...]

"Bleeding" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Intravenous Infusion
Intravenous therapy
Intravenous therapy
(IV) is a therapy that delivers liquid substances directly into a vein (intra- + ven- + -ous). The intravenous route of administration can be used for injections (with a syringe at higher pressures) or infusions (typically using only the pressure supplied by gravity). Intravenous infusions are commonly referred to as drips
[...More...]

"Intravenous Infusion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Low Blood Pressure
Hypotension is low blood pressure, especially in the arteries of the systemic circulation.[1] Blood pressure
Blood pressure
is the force of blood pushing against the walls of the arteries as the heart pumps out blood. A systolic blood pressure of less than 90 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) or diastolic of less than 60 mm Hg is generally considered to be hypotension.[2][3] However, in practice, blood pressure is considered too low only if noticeable symptoms are present.[4] Hypotension is the opposite of hypertension, which is high blood pressure. It is best understood as a physiological state, rather than a disease
[...More...]

"Low Blood Pressure" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Cyanide Toxicity
Cyanide poisoning is poisoning that results from exposure to a number of forms of cyanide.[4] Early symptoms include headache, dizziness, fast heart rate, shortness of breath, and vomiting.[2] This may then be followed by seizures, slow heart rate, low blood pressure, loss of consciousness, and cardiac arrest.[2] Onset of symptoms is usually within a few minutes.[2][3] If a person survives, there may be long-term neurological problems.[2] Toxic cyanide-containing compounds include hydrogen cyanide gas and a number of cyanide salts.[2] Poisoning is relatively common following breathing in smoke from a house fire.[2] Other potential routes of exposure include workplaces involved in metal polishing, certain insecticides, the medication nitroprusside, and certain seeds such as those of apples and apricots.[3][6][7] Liquid forms of cyanide can be absorbed through the skin.[8] Cyanide ions interfere with cellular respiration, resulting in the body's tissues being unable to use oxygen.[2] Dia
[...More...]

"Cyanide Toxicity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Methemoglobinemia
Methemoglobinemia
Methemoglobinemia
is a condition caused by elevated levels of methemoglobin in the blood. Methemoglobin
Methemoglobin
is a form of hemoglobin that contains the ferric [Fe3+] form of iron. The affinity for oxygen of ferric iron is impaired
[...More...]

"Methemoglobinemia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pregnancy
Pregnancy, also known as gestation, is the time during which one or more offspring develops inside a woman.[4] A multiple pregnancy involves more than one offspring, such as with twins.[12] Pregnancy can occur by sexual intercourse or assisted reproductive technology.[6] Childbirth
Childbirth
typically occurs around 40 weeks from the last menstrual period (LMP).[4][5] This is just over nine months, where each month averages 29½ days.[4][5] When measured from conception it is about 38 weeks.[5] An embryo is the developing offspring during the first eight weeks following conception, after which
[...More...]

"Pregnancy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Intravenous Therapy
Intravenous therapy
Intravenous therapy
(IV) is a therapy that delivers liquid substances directly into a vein (intra- + ven- + -ous). The intravenous route of administration can be used for injections (with a syringe at higher pressures) or infusions (typically using only the pressure supplied by gravity). Intravenous infusions are commonly referred to as drips
[...More...]

"Intravenous Therapy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Drugs.com
Drugs.com
Drugs.com
is an online pharmaceutical encyclopedia which provides drug information for consumers and healthcare professionals primarily in the USA.Contents1 Website 2 History 3 References 4 External linksWebsite[edit] The Drugs.com
Drugs.com
website is owned and operated by the Drugsite Trust. The Drugsite Trust is a privately held Trust administered by two New Zealand pharmacists, Karen Ann and Phillip James Thornton. [1] The site contains a library of reference information which includes content from Cerner
Cerner
Multum, Micromedex
Micromedex
from Truven Health Analytics, Wolters Kluwer Health, U.S
[...More...]

"Drugs.com" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Hypertensive Crises
Severely elevated blood pressure (equal to or greater than a systolic 180 or diastolic of 110—sometimes termed malignant or accelerated hypertension) is referred to as a hypertensive crisis, as blood pressure at this level confers a high risk of complications
[...More...]

"Hypertensive Crises" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Preload (cardiology)
In cardiac physiology, preload is the end diastolic volume that stretches the right or left ventricle of the heart to its greatest dimensions under variable physiologic demand.[1] In other words, it is the initial stretching of the cardiomyocytes prior to contraction; therefore, it is related to the sarcomere length at the end of diastole. Parameters such as ventricular end diastolic volume or pressure are used to measure preload since the ideal length of the cardiac sarcomere cannot be measured. Passive filling of the (heart) ventricle and subsequent atrial contraction thus allows an echocardiographically volumetric measurement. Preload is theoretically most accurately described as the initial stretching of a single cardiomyocyte prior to contraction. This cannot be measured in vivo and therefore other measurements are used as estimates
[...More...]

"Preload (cardiology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.