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Socrates BM GR1973
Socrates
Socrates
(/ˈsɒkrətiːz/;[2] Ancient Greek: Σωκρᾰ́της, translit. Sōkrátēs, [sɔːkrátɛːs]; c. 470 – 399 BC)[3][4] was a classical Greek (Athenian) philosopher credited as one of the founders of Western philosophy, and as being the first moral philosopher,[5][6] of the Western ethical tradition of thought.[7][8][9] An enigmatic figure, he made no writings, and is known chiefly through the accounts of classical writers writing after his lifetime, particularly his students Plato
Plato
and Xenophon. Other sources include the contemporaneous Antisthenes, Aristippus, and Aeschines of Sphettos
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Socrates (other)
Socrates
Socrates
(c. 469 BC – 399 BC) is an ancient Greek philosopher. Socrates, Sokrates or Sokratis may also refer to:Contents1 People1.1 Ancient Greeks 1.2 In Christianity 1.3 Athletes 1.4 Politicians, soldiers and businesspeople 1.5 Writers 1.6 Other2 In literature 3 In entertainment 4 Other uses 5 See alsoPeople[edit] Ancient Greeks[edit] Socrates
Socrates
of Achaea (c. 436–401 BC), mercenary general of the Ten Thousand Socrates
Socrates
of Macedon (4th century BC), a hipparchos or cavalry officer in Alexander the Great's army Socrates
Socrates
the Younger (4th century BC), Athenian philosopher Socrates
Socrates
Chrestus (died 90-88 BC), Greek prince and King of BithyniaIn Christianity[edit]martyrs Socrates
Socrates
and Stephen Socrates
Socrates
of Constantinople (born c
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Phaedo
Phædo or Phaedo
Phaedo
(/ˈfiːdoʊ/; Greek: Φαίδων, Phaidōn, Greek pronunciation: [pʰaídɔːn]), also known to ancient readers as On The Soul,[1] is one of the best-known dialogues of Plato's middle period, along with the Republic and the Symposium. The philosophical subject of the dialogue is the immortality of the soul. It is set in the last hours prior to the death of Socrates, and is Plato's fourth and last dialogue to detail the philosopher's final days, following Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito. In the dialogue, Socrates
Socrates
discusses the nature of the afterlife on his last day before being executed by drinking hemlock. Socrates
Socrates
has been imprisoned and sentenced to death by an Athenian jury for not believing in the gods of the state (though some scholars think it was more for his support of "philosopher kings" as opposed to democracy)[2] and for corrupting the youth of the city
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Aristippus
Aristippus of Cyrene
Aristippus of Cyrene
(/ˌærəˈstɪpəs/; Greek: Ἀρίστιππος ὁ Κυρηναῖος; c. 435 – c. 356 BCE) was the founder of the Cyrenaic school
Cyrenaic school
of Philosophy.[1] He was a pupil of Socrates, but adopted a very different philosophical outlook, teaching that the goal of life was to seek pleasure by adapting circumstances to oneself and by maintaining proper control over both adversity and prosperity
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Aeschines Of Sphettos
Aeschines
Aeschines
of Sphettus (Greek: Αἰσχίνης Σφήττιος) or Aeschines
Aeschines
Socraticus (sometimes but now rarely written as Aischines or Æschines; c. 425 BC – c
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Aristophanes
Aristophanes
Aristophanes
(/ˌærɪˈstɒfəniːz/ or /ˌɛrɪˈstɒfəniːz/;[2] Greek: Ἀριστοφάνης, pronounced [aristopʰánɛːs]; c. 446 – c. 386 BC), son of Philippus, of the deme Kydathenaion (Latin: Cydathenaeum),[3] was a comic playwright of ancient Athens. Eleven of his forty plays survive virtually complete
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Playwright
A playwright or dramatist (rarely dramaturge) is a person who writes plays.Contents1 Etymology 2 History2.1 Early playwrights 2.2 Aristotle's Poetics techniques 2.3 Neo-classical theory 2.4 Well-made play3 Play formats 4 Contemporary playwrights in America 5 New play development in America 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The term is not a variant spelling of the common misspelling "playwrite": the word wright is an archaic English term for a craftsman or builder (as in a wheelwright or cartwright). Hence the prefix and the suffix combine to indicate someone who has "wrought" words, themes, and other elements into a dramatic form - someone who crafts plays
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Pedagogy
Pedagogy
Pedagogy
(/ˈpɛdəˌɡɒdʒi/) is the discipline that deals with the theory and practice of teaching and how these influence student learning.[1][2][3] Pedagogy
Pedagogy
informs teacher actions, judgments, and teaching strategies by taking into consideration theories of learning, understandings of students and their needs, and the backgrounds and interests of individual students.[4][5] Pedagogy
Pedagogy
includes how the teacher interacts with students and the social and intellectual environment the teacher seeks to establish.[4][5] Its aims may include furthering liberal education (the general development of human potential) to the narrower specifics of vocational education (the imparting and acquisition of specific skills). Instructive strategies are governed by the pupil's background knowledge and experience, situation, and environment, as well as learning goals set by the student and teacher
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Socratic Problem
The Socratic problem
Socratic problem
(or Socratic question)[1] is a term used in historical scholarship concerning attempts at reconstructing a historical and philosophical image of Socrates
Socrates
based on the variable, and sometimes contradictory, nature of the existing sources on his life. Scholars rely upon the extant sources such as those of contemporaries like Aristophanes
Aristophanes
or disciples of Socrates
Socrates
like Plato and Xenophon
Xenophon
for knowing anything about Socrates. However, these sources contain contradictory details of his life, words, and beliefs when taken together
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Socratic Dialogues
Socratic dialogue
Socratic dialogue
(Ancient Greek: Σωκρατικὸς λόγος) is a genre of literary prose developed in Greece at the turn of the fourth century BCE. It is preserved in the works of Plato
Plato
and Xenophon. The discussion of moral and philosophical problems between two or more characters in a dialogue is an illustration of one version of the Socratic method
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Athens
Athens
Athens
(/ˈæθɪnz/;[3] Greek: Αθήνα, Athína [aˈθina], Ancient Greek: Ἀθῆναι, Athênai [a.tʰɛ̂ː.nai̯]) is the capital and largest city of Greece
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Apology (Plato)
The Apology of Socrates
Socrates
(Greek: Ἀπολογία Σωκράτους, Apologia Sokratous, Latin: Apologia Socratis), by Plato
Plato
(Steph
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Crito
Crito
Crito
(/ˈkraɪtoʊ/ KRY-toh or /ˈkriːtoʊ/ KREE-toh; Ancient Greek: Κρίτων [krítɔːn]) is a dialogue by the ancient Greek philosopher Plato. It depicts a conversation between Socrates
Socrates
and his wealthy friend Crito
Crito
regarding justice (δικαιοσύνη), injustice (ἀδικία), and the appropriate response to injustice. Socrates
Socrates
thinks that injustice may not be answered with injustice, and refuses Crito's offer to finance his escape from prison. The dialogue contains an ancient statement of the social contract theory of government.Contents1 Summary 2 Crito's argument to Socrates 3 Socrates' responses 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksSummary[edit] The dialogue takes place in Socrates' prison cell, where he awaits execution
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Symposium (Plato)
The Symposium
Symposium
(Ancient Greek: Συμπόσιον) is a philosophical text by Plato
Plato
dated c. 385–370 BC.[1][2] It depicts a friendly contest of extemporaneous speeches given by a group of notable men attending a banquet. The men include the philosopher Socrates, the general and political figure Alcibiades, and the comic playwright Aristophanes. The speeches are to be given in praise of Eros, who is the god of love and desire, and the son of Aphrodite. In the Symposium, Eros
Eros
is recognized both as erotic love, and as a phenomenon that is capable of inspiring courage, valor, great deeds and works, and vanquishing man’s natural fear of death. It is seen as transcending its earthly origins, and attaining spiritual heights. This extraordinary elevation of the concept of love raises a question of whether some of the most extreme extents of meaning might be intended as humor or farce
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Classical Writers
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to classical studies: Classical studies
Classical studies
(Classics for short) – earliest branch of the humanities, which covers the languages, literature, history, art, and other cultural aspects of the ancient Mediterranean
Mediterranean
world. The field focuses primarily on, but is not limited to, Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
and Ancient Rome
Ancient Rome
during classical antiquity, the era spanning from the late Bronze Age
Bronze Age
of Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
during the Minoan and Mycenaean periods (c. 1600-1100 BCE) through the period known as Late Antiquity to the fall of the Western Roman Empire, c. 500 CE
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Martin Cohen (philosopher)
Martin Cohen (born 1964) is a British philosopher, an editor and reviewer who writes on philosophy, philosophy of science and political philosophy. He is currently Visititng Research Fellow in Philosophy at the University of Hertfordshire(UK). He studied philosophy and social science at Sussex University
Sussex University
where his tutors included some of the early group of philosophers who launched the University's pioneering language and values programme, including Terry Diffey and Bernard Harrison. He obtained a teaching qualification at Keele University
Keele University
and his PhD in philosophy of education from the University of Exeter. After research posts at universities in Britain and Australia, Cohen moved to France to concentrate on his writing, which typically blend "psychological and social studies with philosophical theory ..
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