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Social Security Administration
The United States Social Security Administration
Social Security Administration
(SSA)[2] is an independent agency of the U.S. federal government that administers Social Security, a social insurance program consisting of retirement, disability, and survivors' benefits. To qualify for most of these benefits, most workers pay Social Security taxes on their earnings; the claimant's benefits are based on the wage earner's contributions. Otherwise benefits such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI) are given based on need. The Social Security Administration
Social Security Administration
was established by a law codified at 42 U.S.C. § 901. Its current leader, Deputy Commissioner of Operations Nancy Berryhill, was acting commissioner from January 19, 2017 through November 17, 2017.[3] SSA is headquartered in Woodlawn, Maryland, just to the west of Baltimore, at what is known as Central Office
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Federal Government Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Congressional districts
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United States Department Of War
The United States Department of War, also called the War Department (and occasionally War Office in the early years), was the United States Cabinet department originally responsible for the operation and maintenance of the United States Army, also bearing responsibility for naval affairs until the establishment of the Navy Department in 1798, and for most land-based air forces until the creation of the Department of the Air Force on September 18, 1947. The Secretary of War, a civilian with such responsibilities as finance and purchases and a minor role in directing military affairs, headed the War Department throughout its existence. The War Department existed from August 7, 1789[1] until September 18, 1947, when it split into Department of the Army and Department of the Air Force and joined the Department of the Navy as part of the new joint National Military Establishment (NME), renamed the United States Department of Defense in 1949.Contents1 History1.1 1790–1
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Department Of Health And Human Services
Department may refer to:Departmentalization, division of a larger organization into parts with specific responsibilityGovernment and military[edit] Department (country subdivision), a geographical and administrative division within a countryDepartments of Colombia, a grouping of municipalities Departments of France, administrative divisions three levels below the national government Departments of Honduras Departments of Peru, name given to the subdivisions of Peru until 2002 Department (United States Army), corps areas of the U.S
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Bill Clinton
Governor of Arkansas1978 election 1980 campaign 1982 reelection 1984 reelection 1986 reelection 1990 reelection42nd President of the United StatesPresidencyTimelinePoliciesEconomic Gun Control Environmental ForeignClinton DoctrineInternational tripsAppointmentsCabinet Judicial AppointmentsFirst termCampaign for the presidencyPrimaries 1992 election1st inaugurationNAFTA Health Security Act 1994 midterm elections Economic policy Travelgate Whitewater AmeriCorps Dayton AgreementSecond termReelection campaignPrimaries 1996 reelection2nd inaugurationOperation Infinite Reach Bombing of Yugoslavia Balanced BudgetClinton–Lewinsky scandal ImpeachmentOne America Initiative Pardon controversyPost-presidencyPresidential Library My Life Activities Clinton Foundation Clinton Bush
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Cost Of Living
Cost
Cost
of living is the cost of maintaining a certain standard of living. Changes in the cost of living over time are often operationalized in a cost of living index. Cost
Cost
of living calculations are also used to compare the cost of maintaining a certain standard of living in different geographic areas. Differences in cost of living between locations can also be measured in terms of purchasing power parity rates.Contents1 Cost-of-living adjustment (COLa) 2 CPI 3 Social Security Benefits 4 Worldwide Cost
Cost
of Living Survey 5 Other uses 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksCost-of-living adjustment (COLa)[edit] Employment contracts, pension benefits, and government entitlements such as Social Security can be tied to a cost-of-living index, typically to the consumer price index (CPI). A COLA adjusts salaries based on changes in a cost-of-living index. Salaries are typically adjusted annually
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Inflation
In economics, inflation is a sustained increase in the general price level of goods and services in an economy over a period of time.[1] When the price level rises, each unit of currency buys fewer goods and services; consequently, inflation reflects a reduction in the purchasing power per unit of money – a loss of real value in the medium of exchange and unit of account within the economy.[2][3] A chief measure of price inflation is the inflation rate, the annualized percentage change in a general price index, usually the consumer price index, over time.[4] The opposite of inflation is deflation. Inflation
Inflation
affects economies in various positive and negative ways
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Fixed Income
Fixed income
Fixed income
refers to any type of investment under which the borrower or issuer is obliged to make payments of a fixed amount on a fixed schedule. For example, the borrower may have to pay interest at a fixed rate once a year, and to repay the principal amount on maturity. Fixed-income securities can be contrasted with equity securities – often referred to as stocks and shares – that create no obligation to pay dividends or any other form of income. In order for a company to grow its business, it often must raise money – for example, to finance an acquisition; to buy equipment or land; or to invest in new product development. The terms on which investors will finance the company will depend on the risk profile of the company. The company can give up equity by issuing stock, or can promise to pay regular interest and repay the principal on the loan (bonds or bank loans). Fixed-income securities also trade differently than equities
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Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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Inner Harbor
The Inner Harbor
Inner Harbor
is a historic seaport, tourist attraction, and landmark of the city of Baltimore, Maryland, USA. It was described by the Urban Land Institute
Urban Land Institute
in 2009 as “the model for post-industrial waterfront redevelopment around the world.”[1] The Inner Harbor
Inner Harbor
is located at the mouth of Jones Falls, creating the wide and short northwest branch of the Patapsco River. The district includes any water west of a line drawn between the foot of President Street and the American Visionary Art Museum. The name "Inner Harbor" is used not just for the water but for the surrounding area of the city, with approximate street boundaries of President Street to the east, Lombard Street to the north, Greene Street to the west, and Key Highway
Key Highway
on the south. The harbor is within walking distance of Camden Yards and M&T Bank Stadium
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Shopping Center
A shopping mall is a modern, chiefly North American, term for a form of shopping precinct or shopping center, in which one or more buildings form a complex of shops representing merchandisers with interconnecting walkways that enable customers to walk from unit to unit. A shopping arcade is a specific type of shopping precinct which is usually distinguished in English for mall shopping by the fact that connecting walkways are not owned by a single proprietor and are in open air. Shopping malls in 2017 accounted for 8% of retailing space in the United States.[1] Many early shopping arcades such as the Burlington Arcade
Burlington Arcade
in London, the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II
Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II
in Milan, and numerous arcades in Paris
Paris
are famous and still trading. However, many smaller arcades have been demolished, replaced with large centers or "malls", often accessible by vehicle
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Civilian Conservation Corps
The Civilian Conservation Corps
Civilian Conservation Corps
(CCC) was a public work relief program that operated from 1933 to 1942 in the United States for unemployed, unmarried men. Originally for young men ages 18–25, it was eventually expanded to ages 17–28.[1] Robert Fechner
Robert Fechner
was the first director of the agency, succeeded by James McEntee following Fechner's death. The CCC was a major part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal
New Deal
that provided unskilled manual labor jobs related to the conservation and development of natural resources in rural lands owned by federal, state, and local governments. The CCC was designed to provide jobs for young men and to relieve families who had difficulty finding jobs during the Great Depression
Great Depression
in the United States. Maximum enrollment at any one time was 300,000
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Security Square Mall
Security Square Mall is a mall in the suburbs of Baltimore, Maryland, United States. The mall features over 100 stores and restaurants, as well as a food court, with Burlington, Macy's, Old Navy and Sears serving as anchor stores. One section of the mall, Seoul Plaza (formerly JCPenney), previously included Korean shops and restaurants; however, most of these establishments had closed by 2010.[2] Security Square Mall is located adjacent to the North American School of Trades.Contents1 History1.1 Anchor stores 1.2 Renovations2 Transportation 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Anchor stores[edit] Security Square Mall opened in 1972.[3] Original anchor Hochschild Kohn's sold its store to Hutzler's, who closed the store in 1989,[4] and subsequently sold it to Montgomery Ward. Woolworth closed in 1997 and was replaced with Burlington Coat Factory.[5] Montgomery Ward closed in 2001 and became Modell's Sporting Goods three years later.[6] J.C
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Interstate 70
Interstate 70
Interstate 70
(I-70) is a major Interstate Highway in the United States that runs from I-15 near Cove Fort, Utah
Cove Fort, Utah
to I-695 near Baltimore, Maryland. I-70 approximately traces the path of U.S. Route 40 (US 40, the old National Road) east of the Rocky Mountains. West of the Rockies, the route of I-70 was derived from multiple sources. The Interstate runs through or near many major cities, including Denver, Kansas
Kansas
City, St
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Utah
Utah
Utah
(/ˈjuːtɔː/ YOO-taw, /-tɑː/ -tah  listen) is a state in the western United States. It became the 45th state admitted to the U.S. on January 4, 1896. Utah
Utah
is the 13th-largest by area, 31st-most-populous, and 10th-least-densely populated of the 50 United States. Utah
Utah
has a population of more than 3 million (Census estimate for July 1, 2016)
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