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Social Learning Theory
Social learning theory is a theory of learning and social behavior which proposes that new behaviors can be acquired by observing and imitating others.[1] It states that learning is a cognitive process that takes place in a social context and can occur purely through observation or direct instruction, even in the absence of motor reproduction or direct reinforcement.[2] In addition to the observation of behavior, learning also occurs through the observation of rewards and punishments, a process known as vicarious reinforcement
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Learning
Learning
Learning
is the process of acquiring new or modifying existing knowledge, behaviors, skills, values, or preferences.[1] The ability to learn is possessed by humans, animals, and some machines, and there is also evidence for some kind of learning in some plants.[2] Some learning is immediate, induced by a single event (e.g. being burned by a hot stove), but much skill and knowledge accumulates from repeated experiences. The changes induced by learning often last a lifetime, and it is hard to distinguish learned material that seems to be "lost" from that which cannot be retrieved.[3] Human learning begins before birth and continues until death as a consequence of ongoing interactions between person and environment. The nature and processes involved in learning are studied in many fields, including educational psychology, neuropsychology, experimental psychology, and pedagogy
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Educational Television
Educational television or learning television is the use of television programs in the field of distance education. It may be in the form of individual television programs or dedicated specialty channels that is often associated with cable television in the United States as Public, educational, and government access (PEG) channel providers. There are also adult education programs for an older audience; many of these are instructional television or "telecourse" services that can be taken for college credit. Examples of these include Open University programs on BBC
BBC
television in the UK. Many children's television series are educational, ranging from dedicated learning programs to those that indirectly teach the viewers
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Recall (memory)
Recall in memory refers to the mental process of retrieval of information from the past. Along with encoding and storage, it is one of the three core processes of memory. There are three main types of recall: free recall, cued recall and serial recall
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Sensory-motor Coupling
Sensory-motor coupling is the coupling or integration of the sensory system and motor system. Sensorimotor integration is not a static process
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Motivation
Motivation
Motivation
is the reason for people's actions, desires, and needs. Motivation
Motivation
is also one's direction to behavior, or what causes a person to want to repeat a behavior. An individual is not motivated by another individual
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Natural Selection
Natural selection
Natural selection
is the differential survival and reproduction of individuals due to differences in phenotype. It is a key mechanism of evolution, the change in the heritable traits characteristic of a population over generations. Charles Darwin
Charles Darwin
popularised the term "natural selection", contrasting it with artificial selection, which is intentional, whereas natural selection is not. Variation exists within all populations of organisms. This occurs partly because random mutations arise in the genome of an individual organism, and offspring can inherit such mutations. Throughout the lives of the individuals, their genomes interact with their environments to cause variations in traits
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Mirror Neuron
A mirror neuron, or cubelli neuron, is a neuron that fires both when an animal acts and when the animal observes the same action performed by another.[1][2][3] Thus, the neuron "mirrors" the behavior of the other, as though the observer were itself acting. Such neurons have been directly observed in primate species.[4] Birds have been shown to have imitative resonance behaviors and neurological evidence suggests the presence of some form of mirroring system.[4][5] In humans, brain activity consistent with that of mirror neurons has been found in the premotor cortex, the supplementary motor area, the primary somatosensory cortex and the inferior parietal cortex.[6] The function of the mirror system in humans is a subject of much speculation
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Edwin Sutherland
Edwin Hardin Sutherland ( Gibbon, Nebraska
Gibbon, Nebraska
August 13, 1883 – October 11, 1950 Bloomington, Indiana) was an American sociologist. He is considered as one of the most influential criminologists of the 20th century. He was a sociologist of the symbolic interactionist school of thought and is best known for defining white-collar crime and differential association, a general theory of crime and delinquency. Sutherland earned his Ph.D.
Ph.D.
in sociology from the University of Chicago in 1913.Contents1 Background and early education 2 Career 3 Theory 4 Works 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBackground and early education[edit] Sutherland grew up and studied in Ottawa, Kansas
Ottawa, Kansas
and Grand Island, Nebraska
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Educational Entertainment
Educational entertainment
Educational entertainment
(also referred to by the portmanteau neologism[1] edutainment[2]) is media designed to educate through entertainment. Most often it includes content intended to teach but has incidental entertainment value
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Telenovela
A telenovela (/ˌtɛlənoʊˈvɛlə/ or /ˌtɛlənəˈvɛlə/;[1] Spanish: [telenoˈβela], European Portuguese: [ˌtɛɫɛnuˈvɛɫɐ], Brazilian Portuguese: [ˌtɛlenoˈvɛla]) is a type of limited-run television serial drama or soap opera produced primarily in Latin America.[2] The word combines tele, short for televisión or televisão (Spanish and Portuguese words for television), and novela, a Spanish and Portuguese word for "novel".[note 1] Similar genres around the world include teleserye (Philippines), téléroman (Canada, specifically Quebec), or simply dramas ( Asia
Asia
and the rest of the Arab World). In Spain, they are also called culebrones ("long snakes") because of the convoluted plots.[citation needed] Commonly described using the American colloquialism Spanish soap opera, many telenovelas share some stylistic and thematic similarities to the soap opera familiar to the English-speaking world
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Eric Bentley
Eric Russell Bentley (born September 14, 1916) is a British-born American critic, playwright, singer, editor and translator. In 1998, he was inducted into the American Theatre Hall of Fame and is a member of the New York Theater Hall of Fame in recognition of his many years of cabaret performances.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Works2.1 Critical works 2.2 Discography 2.3 Dramatic works3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] Born in Bolton, Lancashire, England, Bentley attended Oxford University, receiving his degree in 1938, and subsequently attended Yale University (B.Litt, 1939 and PhD., 1941), where he received the John Addison Porter
John Addison Porter
Prize.[2] Beginning in 1953, Bentley taught at Columbia University
Columbia University
and simultaneously was a theatre critic for The New Republic
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Attention
CognitionConcept Reasoning Decision making Problem solvingNumerical cognitionNumerosity adaptation effect Approximate number system Parallel individuation systemv t eFocused attention Attention
Attention
is the behavioral and cognitive process of selectively concentrating on a discrete aspect of information, whether deemed subjective or objective, while ignoring other perceivable information. It is the taking possession by the mind in clear and vivid form of one out of what seem several simultaneous objects or trains of thought. Focalization, concentration of consciousness are of its esse
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Carl Jung
Carl Gustav Jung
Carl Gustav Jung
(/jʊŋ/; German: [ˈkarl ˈɡʊstaf ˈjʊŋ]; 26 July 1875 – 6 June 1961) was a Swiss psychiatrist and psychoanalyst who founded analytical psychology. His work has been influential not only in psychiatry but also in anthropology, archaeology, literature, philosophy, and religious studies. As a notable research scientist based at the famous Burghölzli
Burghölzli
hospital, under Eugen Bleuler, he came to the attention of the Viennese founder of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud. The two men conducted a lengthy correspondence and collaborated on an initially joint vision of human psychology. Freud saw in the younger man the potential heir he had been seeking to carry on his "new science" of psychoanalysis. Jung's research and personal vision, however, made it impossible for him to bend to his older colleague's doctrine and a schism became inevitable
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Triune Brain
The triune brain is a model of the evolution of the vertebrate forebrain and behavior, proposed by the American physician and neuroscientist Paul D. MacLean. MacLean originally formulated his model in the 1960s and propounded it at length in his 1990 book The Triune Brain in Evolution.[1] The triune brain consists of the reptilian complex, the paleomammalian complex (limbic system), and the neomammalian complex (neocortex), viewed as structures sequentially added to the forebrain in the course of evolution. However, this hypothesis is no longer espoused by the majority of comparative neuroscientists in the post-2000 era.[2] The triune brain hypothesis became familiar to a broad popular audience through Carl Sagan's Pulitzer prize
Pulitzer prize
winning 1977 book The Dragons of Eden
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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