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Slavery
Slavery
Slavery
is any system in which principles of property law are applied to people, allowing individuals to own, buy and sell other individuals, as a de jure form of property.[1] A slave is unable to withdraw unilaterally from such an arrangement and works without remuneration. Many scholars now use the term chattel slavery to refer to this specific sense of legalised, de jure slavery
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Slaves (film)
Slaves is a 1969 American drama film directed by Herbert Biberman. It was entered into the 1969 Cannes Film Festival.[1] The film stars Dionne Warwick (in her screen acting debut), Ossie Davis, and Stephen Boyd.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksPlot[edit] Set in the 1850s South, the film follows Cassy and Luke, two black slaves who are sold to the sadistic plantation owner MacKay. He wants labor from the men and sex from the women. On this, he is determined to exploit both Cassy and Luke. Cast[edit]Dionne Warwick as Cassy Ossie Davis as Luke Stephen Boyd as MacKay Marilyn Clark as Mrs. Bennett Nancy Coleman as Mrs. Stillwell Julius Harris as Shadrach James Heath as Luther David Huddleston as Holland Eva Jessye as Julie Oscar Paul Jones as Zacharious Aldine King as Emmeline Robert Kya-Hill as Jericho Gale Sondergaard as New Orleans lady Shepperd Strudwick as Mr
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Slave (other)
A slave is a person owned or entrapped by another. Slave or slaves may also refer to:Contents1 Places 2 Film and television 3 Literature 4 Music4.1 Artists 4.2 Albums 4.3 Songs5 Stage productions 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPlaces[edit]Slave craton, a geological formation Slave River, a Canadian riverFilm and television[edit]The Slave (1917 comedy film), a 1917 film starring Oliver Hardy The Slave (1917 drama film), a 1917 Fox film starring Valeska Suratt The Slave (1962 film), a 1962 film starring Steve Reeves My Darling Slave or The Slave, a 1973 sex comedy film Slaves (film), a 1969 drama film Slave I, a Star Wars spacecraft Slave (Blake's 7), a fictional computer in Blake's 7 Slave, a 2009 film starring Natassia MaltheLiterature[edit]The Slave (Isaac Bashevis Singer novel) Slave - My True Story, a 2002 autobiography by Mende Nazer The Slave, a 1978 novel by Elechi Amadi "The Slave" or "Lu Scavu", a fairy tale from Sic
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Slave Ship
A slave ship is a vessel used to transport slaves. Slave Ship may also refer to:The Slave Ship, a painting by J. M. W. Turner Slave Ship (Jeter novel), a 1998 science fiction novel by K. W
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Impressment
Impressment, colloquially, "the press" or the "press gang", refers to the act of taking men into a military or naval force by compulsion, with or without notice. Navies of several nations used forced recruitment by various means. The large size of the British Royal Navy in the Age of Sail
Age of Sail
meant impressment was most commonly associated with Britain. It was used by the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
in wartime, beginning in 1664 and during the 18th and early 19th centuries as a means of crewing warships, although legal sanction for the practice can be traced back to the time of Edward I of England. The Royal Navy
Royal Navy
impressed many merchant sailors, as well as some sailors from other, mostly European, nations. People liable to impressment were "eligible men of seafaring habits between the ages of 18 and 55 years"
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Mamluk
Mamluk
Mamluk
(Arabic: مملوك mamlūk (singular), مماليك mamālīk (plural), meaning "property", also transliterated as mamlouk, mamluq, mamluke, mameluk, mameluke, mamaluke or marmeluke) is an Arabic designation for slaves
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Child Labour
Child labour
Child labour
refers to the employment of children in any work that deprives children of their childhood, interferes with their ability to attend regular school, and that is mentally, physically, socially or morally dangerous and harmful.[3] This practice is considered exploitative by many international organisations
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Conscription
Military
Military
service National service Conscription
Conscription
crisis Conscientious objector Alternative civilian service Conscription
Conscription
by countryv t eConscription, sometimes called the draft, is the compulsory enlistment of people in a national service, most often a military service.[5] Conscription
Conscription
dates back to antiquity and continues in some countries to the present day under various names. The modern system of near-universal national conscription for young men dates to the French Revolution in the 1790s, where it became the basis of a very large and powerful military
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Penal Labour
Penal labour
Penal labour
is a generic term for various kinds of unfree labour which prisoners are required to perform, typically manual labour. The work may be light or hard, depending on the context. Forms of sentence involving penal labour have included involuntary servitude, penal servitude and imprisonment with hard labour. The term may refer to several related scenarios: labour as a form of punishment, the prison system used as a means to secure labour, and labour as providing occupation for convicts
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Barbary Pirates
The Barbary pirates, sometimes called Barbary corsairs or Ottoman corsairs, were Ottoman pirates and privateers who operated from North Africa, based primarily in the ports of Salé, Rabat, Algiers, Tunis, and Tripoli. This area was known in Europe
Europe
as the Barbary Coast, a term derived from the name of its Berber inhabitants. Their predation extended throughout the Mediterranean, south along West Africa's Atlantic
Atlantic
seaboard and even South America,[1] and into the North Atlantic
Atlantic
as far north as Iceland, but they primarily operated in the western Mediterranean
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Wage Slavery
Wage
Wage
slavery is a term used to draw an analogy between slavery and wage labor by focusing on similarities between owning and renting a person. It is usually used to refer to a situation where a person's livelihood depends on wages or a salary, especially when the dependence is total and immediate.[1][2] The term "wage slavery" has been used to criticize exploitation of labour and social stratification, with the former seen primarily as unequal bargaining power between labor and capital (particularly when workers are paid comparatively low wages, e.g
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History Of Children In The Military
Children in the military
Children in the military
are children (defined by the Convention on the Rights of the Child
Child
as persons under the age of 18) who are associated with military organizations, such as state armed forces and non-state armed groups.[1] Throughout history
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Babylonian Law
Fertile Crescent Mesopotamia Akkadian
Akkadian
Empire Assyria Babylonia Neo-Assyrian Empire Neo-Babylonian Empire SumerEgyptAncient EgyptPersiaAchaemenid Empire Elam MedesAnatoliaHittites Hurrians Neo-Hittite states UrartuThe LevantAncient Israel PhoeniciaArchaeological periodsChronology Bronze Age Bronze Age
Bronze Age
collapse Iron AgeLanguagesAkkadian Aramaic Assyriology Cuneiform script Elamite Hebrew Hittite Hurrian Phoenician Sumerian UrartianLiteratureBabylonian Hittite texts SumerianMythologyBabylonian Hittite Mesopotamian EgyptianOther topicsCradle of civilization Assyrian law Babylonian astronomy Babylonian law Babylonian mathematics Cuneiform law History of the Middle Eastv t e Babylonian law
Babylonian law
is a subset of cuneiform law that has received particular study, owing to the singular extent of the associated archaeological material that has been found for it
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Emancipation Reform Of 1861
The Emancipation Reform of 1861 in Russia (Russian: Крестьянская реформа 1861 года, translit. Krestyanskaya reforma 1861 goda, literally: "the peasants Reform of 1861") was the first and most important of liberal reforms passed during the reign (1855-1881) of Emperor Alexander II of Russia. The reform effectively abolished serfdom throughout the Russian Empire. The 1861 Emancipation Manifesto proclaimed the emancipation of the serfs on private estates and of the domestic (household) serfs. By this edict more than 23 million people received their liberty.[1] Serfs
Serfs
gained the full rights of free citizens, including rights to marry without having to gain consent, to own property and to own a business. The Manifesto prescribed that peasants would be able to buy the land from the landlords
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Ghilman
Ghilman
Ghilman
(singular Arabic: غُلاَم‎ ghulām ,[note 1] plural غِلْمَان ghilmān )[note 2] were slave-soldiers and/or mercenaries in the armies of the Abbasid, Ottoman, and Persian Safavid, Afsharid and Qajar empires.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit]A Ghulam Ghilman
Ghilman
were introduced to the Abbasid Caliphate
Abbasid Caliphate
during the reign of al-Mu'tasim (r. 833–842), who showed them great favor and relied upon them for his personal guard. The ghilman were slave-soldiers taken as prisoners of war from conquered regions or frontier zones, especially from among the Turkic people
Turkic people
of Central Asia
Central Asia
and the Caucasian peoples (Turkish: Kölemen)
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Corvée
Corvée
Corvée
(French: [kɔʁve] ( listen)) is a form of unpaid, unfree labour, which is intermittent in nature and which lasts limited periods of time: typically only a certain number of days' work each year. Statute labour is a corvée imposed by a state for the purposes of public works.[1] As such it represents a form of levy (taxation). Unlike other forms of levy, such as a tithe, a corvée does not require the population to have land, crops or cash. It was thus favored in historical economies in which barter was more common than cash transactions or circulating money was in short supply. The obligation for tenant farmers to perform corvée work for landlords on private landed estates has been widespread throughout history, before the Industrial Revolution. The term is most typically used in reference to medieval and early modern Europe, where work was often expected by a feudal landowner (of their vassals), or by a monarch of their subjects
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