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Sittwe
Sittwe
Sittwe
(Burmese: စစ်တွေမြို့; MLCTS: cac twe mrui.; Burmese pronunciation: [sɪʔtwè mjo̰]; formerly Akyab) is the capital of Rakhine State, Myanmar
Myanmar
(Burma). Sittwe, pronounced site-tway in the Rakhine language, is located on an estuarial island created at the confluence of the Kaladan, Mayu, and Lay Mro rivers emptying into the Bay of Bengal. The city has 181,000 inhabitants (2006). It is the administrative seat of Sittwe Township and Sittwe District.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Demographics 4 Attractions 5 Climate 6 Education 7 Economy 8 Sport 9 Other 10 Image gallery 11 See also 12 References 13 External linksEtymology[edit] The name Sittwe
Sittwe
is the Burmese version of Rakhine Saite-Twêy (literally, "the place where the war meets")
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Estuarial
An estuary is a partially enclosed coastal body of brackish water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea.[1] Estuaries form a transition zone between river environments and maritime environments. They are subject both to marine influences—such as tides, waves, and the influx of saline water—and to riverine influences—such as flows of fresh water and sediment. The mixing of sea water and fresh water provide high levels of nutrients both in the water column and in sediment, making estuaries among the most productive natural habitats in the world.[2] Most existing estuaries formed during the Holocene epoch with the flooding of river-eroded or glacially scoured valleys when the sea level began to rise about 10,000–12,000 years ago.[3] Estuaries are typically classified according to their geomorphological features or to water-circulation patterns
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Time In Myanmar
Myanmar
Myanmar
Standard Time (MMT) (Burmese: မြန်မာ စံတော်ချိန်, [mjəmà sàɴdɔ̀dʑèiɴ]; formerly Burma Standard Time (BST)) is the standard time in Myanmar, 6:30 hours ahead of UTC
UTC
(UTC+06:30). MMT is calculated on the basis of 97° 30' longitude.[1] MMT is used all year round as Myanmar
Myanmar
does not observe daylight saving time.[2][3] See also[edit]UTC+06:30 Universal TimeReferences[edit]^ Myanmar: Facts and Figures. Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar. 2002.  ^ Nautical Almanac Office (U S ) (17 May 2013). The Nautical Almanac for the Year 2014. Government Printing Office
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Malaria
Malaria
Malaria
is a mosquito-borne infectious disease affecting humans and other animals caused by parasitic protozoans (a group of single-celled microorganisms) belonging to the Plasmodium
Plasmodium
type.[2]
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British Empire
The British Empire
Empire
comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states. It originated with the overseas possessions and trading posts established by England
England
between the late 16th and early 18th centuries. At its height, it was the largest empire in history and, for over a century, was the foremost global power.[1] By 1913, the British Empire
Empire
held sway over 412 million people, 7001230000000000000♠23% of the world population at the time,[2] and by 1920, it covered 35,500,000 km2 (13,700,000 sq mi),[3] 7001240000000000000♠24% of the Earth's total land area.[4] As a result, its political, legal, linguistic and cultural legacy is widespread
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First Anglo-Burmese War
First
First
or 1st is the ordinal form of the number one (#1). First
First
o
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Bodawpaya
Bodawpaya
Bodawpaya
(Burmese: ဘိုးတော်ဘုရား, pronounced [bódɔ̀ pʰəjá]; Thai: ปดุง; 11 March 1745 – 5 June 1819) was the sixth king of the Konbaung Dynasty
Dynasty
of Burma. Born Maung Shwe Waing and later Badon Min, he was the fourth son of Alaungpaya, founder of the dynasty and the Third Burmese Empire. He was proclaimed king after deposing his nephew Phaungkaza Maung Maung, son of his oldest brother Naungdawgyi, at Ava. Bodawpaya
Bodawpaya
moved the royal capital back to Amarapura
Amarapura
in 1782. He was titled Hsinbyumyashin (Lord of the White Elephants), although he became known to posterity as Bodawpaya
Bodawpaya
in relation to his successor, his grandson Bagyidaw (Royal Elder Uncle), who in turn was given this name in relation to his nephew Mindon Min
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Cholera
Cholera
Cholera
is an infection of the small intestine by some strains of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae.[3][2] Symptoms may range from none, to mild, to severe.[2] The classic symptom is large amounts of watery diarrhea that lasts a few days.[1] Vomiting
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Burma Campaign
Allies:  British Empire[1] United Kingdom  India British Burma Nepal[2] Gambia  Gold Coast Kenya Nigeria[3]  Hong Kong  Northern Rhodesia  Nyasaland  Southern Rhodesia Uganda China  United StatesMedical Support:  Belgian Congo[4]Axis: Japan State of Burma Azad Hind ThailandCommanders and leaders Archibald Wavell Louis Mountbatten William Slim Du Yuming Wei Lihuang Luo Zhuoying Joseph Stilwell Aung San
Aung San
(1944–1945) Shojiro Iida Masakazu Kawabe Hyotaro Kimura Renya Mutaguchi Aung San
Aung San
(1942–1944) Subhas C. Bose P. Phibunsongkhram J.R
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MLC Transcription System
The Myanmar Language Commission Transcription System (1980), also known as the MLC Transcription System (MLCTS), is a transliteration system for rendering Burmese in the Latin alphabet. It is loosely based on the common system for romanization of Pali,[1] has some similarities to the ALA-LC romanization and was devised by the Myanmar Language Commission. The system is used in many linguistic publications regarding Burmese and is used in MLC publications as the primary form of romanization of Burmese. The transcription system is based on the orthography of formal Burmese and is not suited for colloquial Burmese, which has substantial differences in phonology from formal Burmese
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Burmese Language
The Burmese language
Burmese language
(Burmese: မြန်မာဘာသာ, MLCTS: mranmabhasa, IPA: [mjəmà bàðà]) is the official language of Myanmar. Although the Constitution of Myanmar
Myanmar
officially recognizes the English name of the language as the Myanmar
Myanmar
language,[4] most English speakers continue to refer to the language as Burmese. In 2007, it was spoken as a first language by 34 million, primarily the Bamar (Burman) people and related ethnic groups, and as a second language by 10 million, particularly ethnic minorities in Myanmar
Myanmar
and neighboring countries. Burmese is a tonal, pitch-register, and syllable-timed language,[5] largely monosyllabic and analytic, with a subject–object–verb word order. It is a member of the Lolo-Burmese grouping of the Sino-Tibetan language family
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Tropical Monsoon Climate
A tropical monsoon climate (occasionally known as a tropical wet climate or a tropical monsoon and trade-wind littoral climate) is a type of climate that corresponds to the Köppen climate classification category "Am". Tropical monsoon climates have monthly mean temperatures above 18 °C (64.4 °F) in every month of the year and feature wet and dry seasons, as Tropical savanna climates do. A tropical monsoon climate, however, has its driest month seeing on average less than 60 mm but more than 100 – [total annual precipitation mm /25] of precipitation.[1]:200–1 This latter fact is in direct contrast to a tropical savanna climate, whose driest month sees less than 60 mm of precipitation and also less than 100 – [total annual precipitation mm /25] of precipitation
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Köppen Climate Classification
Köppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. It was first published by Russian German climatologist Wladimir Köppen
Wladimir Köppen
in 1884,[2][3] with several later modifications by Köppen, notably in 1918 and 1936.[4][5] Later, German climatologist Rudolf Geiger (1954, 1961) collaborated with Köppen on changes to the classification system, which is thus sometimes called the Köppen–Geiger climate classification system.[6][7] The Köppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
system has been further modified, within the Trewartha climate classification
Trewartha climate classification
system in the middle 1960s (revised in 1980)
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Telephone Numbering Plan
A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunication to assign telephone numbers to subscriber telephones or other telephony endpoints.[1] Telephone numbers are the addresses of participants in a telephone network, reachable by a system of destination code routing. Telephone numbering plans are defined in each of administrative regions of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and they are also present in private telephone networks. For public number systems, geographic location plays a role in the sequence of numbers assigned to each telephone subscriber. Numbering plans may follow a variety of design strategies which have often arisen from the historical evolution of individual telephone networks and local requirements. A broad division is commonly recognized, distinguishing open numbering plans and closed numbering plans[discuss]
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Consulate General Of The United States, Kolkata
The Consulate General of the United States in Kolkata
Kolkata
represents the interests of the United States government in Kolkata
Kolkata
(previously known as Calcutta), India, and nearby surrounding areas. The Consulate General serves the Indian states of West Bengal[1], Bihar, Jharkhand, Sikkim, Assam, Meghalaya, Tripura, Mizoram, Manipur, Nagaland
Nagaland
and Arunachal Pradesh. Technically, the consulate reports through the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi. The U.S Consulate in Calcutta is the U.S. Department of State’s second oldest Consulate and dates from November 19, 1792.[2]Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The official representation of the U.S. government in India
India
began in November 1792, when the United States's first President, George Washington, nominated Benjamin Joy, of Massachusetts, to be consul
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