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Sitatunga
The sitatunga or marshbuck ( Tragelaphus
Tragelaphus
spekii) is a swamp-dwelling antelope found throughout central Africa, centering on the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Cameroon, parts of Southern Sudan, Ghana, Botswana, Zambia, Gabon, Tanzania, Uganda
Uganda
and Kenya. The species was first described by the English explorer John Hanning Speke
John Hanning Speke
in 1863. The sitatunga is a medium-sized antelope. Males reach approximately 81–116 cm (32–46 in) at the shoulder, while females reach 72–90 cm (28–35 in). Males typically weigh 76–119 kg (168–262 lb), while females weigh 24–57 kg (53–126 lb). The sitatunga has a shaggy, water-resistant coat which varies in colour. The body and feet of this antelope are specially adapted to its swampy habitat
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Conservation Status
The conservation status of a group of organisms (for instance, a species) indicates whether the group still exists and how likely the group is to become extinct in the near future
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Gestation
Gestation is the carrying of an embryo or fetus inside female viviparous animals. It is typical for mammals, but also occurs for some non-mammals. Mammals during pregnancy can have one or more gestations at the same time (multiple gestations). The time interval of a gestation is called the gestation period. In human obstetrics, gestational age refers to the embryonic or fetal age plus two weeks
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Gabon
Coordinates: 1°S 12°E / 1°S 12°E / -1; 12Gabonese Republic République gabonaise  (French)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Union, Travail, Justice" (French) "Union, Work, Justice"Anthem: La Concorde The ConcordLocation of  Gabon  (dark blue) – in Africa  (light blue & dark grey) – in the African Union  (light blue)Capital and largest city Libreville 0°23′N 9°27′E / 0.383°N 9.450°E / 0.383; 9.450Official languages French Vernacular
Vernacular
languagesFang Myene Punu N
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Least Concern
A least concern (LC) species is a species which has been categorized by the International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN) as evaluated but not qualified for any other category. As such they do not qualify as threatened, near threatened, or (before 2001) conservation dependent. Species
Species
cannot be assigned the Least Concern category unless they have had their population status evaluated. That is, adequate information is needed to make a direct, or indirect, assessment of its risk of extinction based on its distribution or population status. Since 2001 the category has had the abbreviation "LC", following the IUCN 2001 Categories & Criteria (version 3.1).[1] However, around 20% of least concern taxa (3261 of 15636) in the IUCN database use the code "LR/lc", which indicates they have not been re-evaluated since 2000
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Uganda
Coordinates: 1°N 32°E / 1°N 32°E / 1; 32 Republic
Republic
of Uganda[1] Jamhuri ya Uganda  (Swahili)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "For God and My Country" "kwa mungu na nchi yangu"Anthem: "Oh Uganda, Land of Beauty"Location of  Uganda  (dark green) – in Africa  (light blue & dark grey) – in the African Union  (light blue)Capital and largest city KampalaOfficial languages English Swahili[2]
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Kenya
Coordinates: 1°N 38°E / 1°N 38°E / 1; 38 Republic
Republic
of Kenya Jamhuri ya Kenya
Kenya
(Kiswahili)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Harambee" (Kiswahili) "Let us all pull together"Anthem: Ee Mungu Nguvu Yetu O God of all creationLocation
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Scientific Description
A species description is a formal description of a newly discovered species, usually in the form of a scientific paper. Its purpose is to give a clear description of a new species of organism and explain how it differs from species which have been described previously or are related. The species description often contains photographs or other illustrations of the type material and states in which museums it has been deposited. The publication in which the species is described gives the new species a formal scientific name. Today, some 1.9 million species have been described and named, out of some 8.7 million that may actually exist on Earth.[1] Millions more have become extinct. It is customary for scientists to introduce all relevant new findings and research in a scientific manuscript, which is sent to other scientists for peer review
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Territory (animal)
In ethology, territory is the sociographical area that an animal of a particular species consistently defends against conspecifics (or, occasionally, animals of other species). Animals that defend territories in this way are referred to as territorial. Territoriality is only shown by a minority of species. More commonly, an individual or a group of animals has an area that it habitually uses but does not necessarily defend; this is called the home range. The home ranges of different groups of animals often overlap, or in the overlap areas, the groups tend to avoid each other rather than seeking to expel each other
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Sexually Mature
Sexual maturity is the capability of an organism to reproduce. It may be considered synonymous with adulthood,[1] but, in humans, puberty encompasses the process of sexual maturation and adulthood is based on cultural definitions.[1][2] Most multicellular organisms are unable to sexually reproduce at birth (or germination), and depending on the species, it may be days, weeks, or years until their bodies are able to do so. Also, certain cues may cause the organism to become sexually mature. They may be external, such as drought, or internal, such as percentage of body fat (such internal cues are not to be confused with hormones which directly produce sexual maturity). Sexual maturity is brought about by a maturing of the reproductive organs and the production of gametes. It may also be accompanied by a growth spurt or other physical changes which distinguish the immature organism from its adult form
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IUCN
The International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN; officially International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
and Natural Resources[2]) is an international organization working in the field of nature conservation and sustainable use of natural resources. It is involved in data gathering and analysis, research, field projects, advocacy, and education. IUCN's mission is to "influence, encourage and assist societies throughout the world to conserve nature and to ensure that any use of natural resources is equitable and ecologically sustainable". Over the past decades, IUCN has widened its focus beyond conservation ecology and now incorporates issues related to sustainable development in its projects. Unlike many other international environmental organisations, IUCN does not itself aim to mobilize the public in support of nature conservation
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Botswana
Botswana
Botswana
(/bɒtˈswɑːnə/), officially the Republic of Botswana (Tswana: Lefatshe la Botswana), is a landlocked country located in Southern Africa. Formerly the British protectorate of Bechuanaland, Botswana
Botswana
adopted its new name after becoming independent within the Commonwealth on 30 September 1966.[7] Since then, it has maintained a strong tradition of stable representative democracy, with a consistent record of uninterrupted democratic elections and the best perceived corruption ranking in Africa
Africa
since at least 1998.[8] Botswana
Botswana
is topographically flat, with up to 70 percent of its territory being the Kalahari
Kalahari
Desert. It is bordered by South Africa
South Africa
to the south and southeast, Namibia
Namibia
to the west and north, and Zimbabwe to the northeast
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Washington Convention
CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, also known as the Washington Convention) is a multilateral treaty to protect endangered plants and animals. It was drafted as a result of a resolution adopted in 1963 at a meeting of members of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The convention was opened for signature in 1973 and CITES entered into force on 1 July 1975. Its aim is to ensure that international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants does not threaten the survival of the species in the wild, and it accords varying degrees of protection to more than 35,000 species of animals and plants. In order to ensure that the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) was not violated, the Secretariat of GATT was consulted during the drafting process.[1] As of 2015[update], Secretary-General of the CITES Secretariat is John E
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Bangweulu Swamp
Bangweulu — 'where the water sky meets the sky' — is one of the world's great wetland systems, comprising Lake Bangweulu, the Bangweulu Swamps and the Bangweulu Flats or floodplain.[1] Situated in the upper Congo River basin in Zambia, the Bangweulu system covers an almost completely flat area roughly the size of Connecticut or East Anglia, at an elevation of 1,140 m straddling Zambia's Luapula Province and Northern Province. It is crucial to the economy and biodiversity of northern Zambia, and to the birdlife of a much larger region, and faces environmental stress and conservation issues.[2] With a long axis of 75 km and a width of up to 40 km, Lake Bangweulu's permanent open water surface is about 3,000 km², which expands when its swamps and floodplains are in flood at the end of the rainy season in May. The combined area of the lake and wetlands reaches 15,000 km²
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Kéwel
The harnessed bushbuck or kéwel ( Tragelaphus
Tragelaphus
scriptus) is a small to medium-sized antelope widespread in west and central Africa. Formerly and alongside the Cape bushbuck it was generically known as the bushbuck, however, it has since been found to be a species in its own right, with a separate geographic distribution. Of all the other tragelaphine antelopes, the harnessed bushbuck is most closely related to the nyala ( Tragelaphus
Tragelaphus
angasi).[1] Distribution[edit] The harnessed bushbuck is distributed from Senegal
Senegal
and southern Mauritania
Mauritania
across the Sahel, east to Ethiopia, and south to Angola
Angola
and the southern Democratic Republic of the Congo
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Kagera Region
Kagera
Kagera
may refer to: Kagera Region in Tanzania Kagera
Kagera
River, originating in Burundi and flowing into Lake Victoria Kagera, Ukerewe, a
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