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Sister-in-law
David
David
and Jonathan, sworn friends and confidants, became brothers-in-law when David
David
married Jonathan's sister Michal.[1]One's sibling-in-law is one's spouse's sibling, or one's sibling's spouse. By gender, this is specified as brother-in-law for one's spouse's brother, one's sibling's husband, or one's spouse's sibling's husband, and sister-in-law for the one's spouse's sister, one's sibling's wife, or one's spouse's sibling's wife.[2] Just like other affines, or "in-laws", siblings-in-law are related by a type of kinship called affinity
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Brothers In Law (other)
Brothers in Law may refer to:Sibling-in-law, a person related to another by being the sibling of a spouse or the spouse of a sibling Brothers in Law (novel), a 1955 British novel Brothers in Law (film), a 1957 film adaptation Brothers in Law (TV series), a 1962 television series based on the novel
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Stepfamily
A stepfamily, blended family or bonus family is a family where at least one parent has children that are not genetically related to the other spouse or partner. Either one parent may have children from a previous relationship. Children in a stepfamily may live with one biological parent, or they may live with each biological parent for a period of time.[1] In addition, visitation rights mean that children in stepfamilies often have contact with both biological parents, even if they permanently live with only one. A child is referred to as the stepchild, stepdaughter or stepson of their biological parent's new spouse, and that person as the stepparent, stepfather or stepmother of the child. A stepfather is the husband of someone's mother, and not someone's biological father.[2] A stepmother is the wife of someone's father, and not someone's biological mother.[3] A step-grandmother is the wife of someone's grandfather, and not someone's biological grandmother
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Leviticus
The Book
Book
of Leviticus (/lɪˈvɪtɪkəs/) is the third book of the Torah
Torah
and the third book of the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
(Old Testament). The book addresses all the people of Israel
Israel
(1:2) though some passages specifically address the priests (6:8). Most of its chapters (1–7, 11–27) consist of God's speeches to Moses
Moses
which he is commanded to repeat to the Israelites. This takes place within the story of the Israelites' Exodus after they escaped Egypt and reached Mt. Sinai (Exodus 19:1). The Book of Exodus
Book of Exodus
narrates how Moses
Moses
led the Israelites in building the Tabernacle
Tabernacle
(Exodus 35–40) based on God's instructions (Exodus 25–31)
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Deuteronomy
The Book
Book
of Deuteronomy is the fifth book of the Torah
Torah
(a section of the Hebrew Bible) and the Christian
Christian
Old Testament. Chapters 1–30 of the book consist of three sermons or speeches delivered to the Israelites
Israelites
by Moses
Moses
on the plains of Moab, shortly before they enter the Promised Land
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History Of The Family
The history of the family is a branch of social history that concerns the sociocultural evolution of kinship groups from prehistoric to modern times.[1] The family has a universal and basic role in all societies.[2] Research on the history of the family crosses disciplines and cultures, aiming to understand the structure and function of the family from many viewpoints
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Household
A household consists of one or more people who live in the same dwelling and also share meals or living accommodation, and may consist of a single family or some other grouping of people.[1] A single dwelling will be considered to contain multiple households if either meals or living space are not shared. The household is the basic unit of analysis in many social, microeconomic and government models, and is important to the fields of economics and inheritance.[2] Household models include the family, varieties of blended families, share housing, group homes, boarding houses, houses in multiple occupation (UK), and a single room occupancy (US)
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Nuclear Family
A nuclear family, elementary family or conjugal family is a family group consisting of two parents and their children (one or more).[1] It is in contrast to a single-parent family, to the larger extended family, and to a family with more than two parents. Nuclear families typically center on a married couple;[1] the nuclear family may have any number of children
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Extended Family
An extended family is a family that extends beyond the nuclear family, consisting of parents like father, mother, and their children, aunts, uncles, and cousins, all living nearby or in the same household. An example is a married couple that lives with either the husband or the wife's parents. The family changes from immediate household to extended household. In some circumstances, the extended family comes to live either with or in place of a member of the immediate family. These families include, in one household, near relatives in addition to an immediate family. An example would be an elderly parent who moves in with his or her children due to old age
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Conjugal Family
A conjugal family is a nuclear family consisting of a married couple and their children (by birth or adoption) who are unmarried and underage. Conjugal means there is a marriage relationship. The family relationship is principally focused inward and ties to extended kin are voluntary and based on emotional bonds, rather than strict duties and obligations. The spouses and their children are considered to be of prime importance, and other more distant relatives less important. The marriage bond is important and stressed. Families have evolved over time by becoming more modern. There are now same sex parents, step parents, adoptive parents so, the name conjugal family was created. It is a much more modern term for nuclear family.Contents1 In Western societies 2 Throughout the years 3 See also 4 ReferencesIn Western societies[edit] There are basic characteristics to a conjugal family. Most western conjugal families are very similar
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Immediate Family
The immediate family is a defined group of relations, used in rules or laws to determine which members of a person's family are affected by those rules. It normally includes a person's parents, spouses, siblings, children, or an individual related by blood whose close association is an equivalent of a family relationship
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Matrifocal Family
A matrifocal family structure is one where mothers head families and fathers play a less important role in the home and in bringing up children.Contents1 Definition 2 Characteristics and distribution 3 History 4 See also 5 References5.1 Bibliography6 External linksDefinition[edit] The concept of the matrifocal family was introduced to the study of Caribbean societies by Raymond Smith in 1956. He linked the emergence of matrifocal families with how households are formed in the region: "The household group tends to be matri-focal in the sense that a woman in the status of 'mother' is usually the de facto leader of the group, and conversely the husband-father, although de jure head of the household group (if present), is usually marginal to the complex of internal relationships of the group
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Dysfunctional Family
A dysfunctional family is a family in which conflict, misbehavior, and often child neglect or abuse on the part of individual parents occur continuously and regularly, leading other members to accommodate such actions. Children sometimes grow up in such families with the understanding that such an arrangement is normal. Dysfunctional families are primarily a result of two adults, one typically overtly abusive and the other codependent, and may also be affected by addictions, such as substance abuse (e.g., alcohol or drugs), or sometimes an untreated mental illness. Dysfunctional parents may emulate or over-correct from their own dysfunctional parents
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Quran
The Quran
Quran
(/kɔːrˈɑːn/[a] kor-AHN; Arabic: القرآن‎ al-Qurʾān,[b] literally meaning "the recitation"; also romanized Qur'an or Koran[c]) is the central religious text of Islam, which Muslims believe to be a revelation from God
God
(Allah).[1] It is wide
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Polyfidelity
Polyfidelity is an intimate relationship structure where all members are considered equal partners and agree to restrict sexual activity to only other members of the group.Contents1 Origin 2 Function 3 Benefits and challenges 4 Other usage 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOrigin[edit] The practices and beliefs underlying polyfidelity have long existed, but in uncodified fashion. The Oneida Commune of the mid-19th century practiced complex marriage, encouraging individual members in the freedom to have multiple ongoing sexual relationships within the community, as an expression of their beliefs and religious faith
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First-degree Relatives
A first-degree relative is one's offspring, sibling or parent.[1] It constitutes a category of family members that largely overlaps with the term nuclear family, but without spouses.[2] First-degree relatives are a common measure used to diagnose risks for common diseases by analyzing family history.[3] According to Consanguinity, however, siblings are second-degree relatives. See also[edit]Second-degree relatives FamilyReferences[edit]^ Talley, Nicholas (2007). Gastroenterology and Hepatology: A Clinical Handbook. p. 200.  ^ Reiss, David (1981). The Family's Construction of Reality. p. 276.  ^ Ginsburg, Geoffrey (2008). Genomic and Personalized Medicine, Volumes 1-2
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