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Simon Garfield
Simon Frank Garfield (born 19 March 1960[1]) is a British journalist and non-fiction author.Contents1 Biography 2 Bibliography2.1 Books 2.2 Critical studies, reviews and biography3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Garfield was born in London in 1960.[2] He was educated at the independent University College School
University College School
in Hampstead, London, and the London School of Economics, where he was executive editor of The Beaver
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University College School
University College School, generally known as UCS Hampstead, is an independent day school in Frognal, northwest London, England. The school was founded in 1830 by University College London
London
and inherited many of that institution's progressive and secular views. According to the Good Schools Guide, the school "Achieves impressive exam results with a relaxed atmosphere". UCS aims to combine the highest standards of academic achievement and pastoral care with outstanding facilities for all-round education with a distinctive liberal ethos. The UCS Hampstead
Hampstead
Foundation is composed of four main entities:"The UCS Pre-Prep" or "The Phoenix" as it was previously known, co-educational for ages 3 to 7 on the Finchley Road site
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WorldCat
WorldCat
WorldCat
is a union catalog that itemizes the collections of 72,000 libraries in 170 countries and territories[3] that participate in the Online Computer Library Center
Online Computer Library Center
(OCLC) global cooperative. It is operated by OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library
Library
Center, Inc.[4] The subscribing member libraries collectively maintain WorldCat's database, the world's largest bibliographic database
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William Huskisson
William Huskisson
William Huskisson
PC (11 March 1770 – 15 September 1830) was a British statesman, financier, and Member of Parliament for several constituencies, including Liverpool.[1] He is commonly known as the world's first widely reported railway passenger casualty as he was run over and fatally wounded by George Stephenson's pioneering locomotive engine Rocket.Contents1 Background and education 2 Early life 3 Political career 4 Death 5 Family and commemorations 6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksBackground and education[edit] Huskisson was born at Birtsmorton Court, Malvern, Worcestershire, the son of William and Elizabeth Huskisson, both members of Staffordshire families. He was one of four brothers
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Steam Railways
A steam locomotive is a type of railway locomotive that produces its pulling power through a steam engine. These locomotives are fueled by burning combustible material – usually coal, wood, or oil – to produce steam in a boiler. The steam moves reciprocating pistons which are mechanically connected to the locomotive's main wheels (drivers). Both fuel and water supplies are carried with the locomotive, either on the locomotive itself or in wagons (tenders) pulled behind. Steam locomotives were first developed in Great Britain during the early 19th century and used for railway transport until the middle of the 20th century. The first steam locomotive, made by Richard Trevithick, first operated on 21 February 1804, three years after the road locomotive he made in 1801. The first commercially successful steam locomotive was created in 1812–13 by John Blenkinsop.[1] Built by George Stephenson and his son Robert's company Robert Stephenson and Company, the Locomotion No
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Stamp Collecting
Stamp collecting
Stamp collecting
is the collecting of postage stamps and related objects. It is related to philately which is the study of stamps
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Mini
The Mini
Mini
is a small economy car produced by the English-based British Motor Corporation (BMC) and its successors from 1959 until 2000. The original is considered an icon of 1960s British popular culture.[8][9][10][11] Its space-saving transverse engine front-wheel drive layout – allowing 80 percent of the area of the car's floorpan to be used for passengers and luggage – influenced a generation of car makers.[12] In 1999 the Mini
Mini
was voted the second most influential car of the 20th century, behind the Ford Model T, and ahead of the Citroën DS
Citroën DS
and Volkswagen Beetle.[13][14] This distinctive two-door car was designed for BMC by Sir Alec Issigonis
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Smithsonian (magazine)
Smithsonian is the official journal published by the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
The first issue was published in 1970.[3]Contents1 History 2 Content 3 Smithsonian American Ingenuity Awards 4 Smithsonian.com Photo Contest 5 Contributors 6 Notes and references 7 External linksHistory[edit] The history of Smithsonian began when Edward K. Thompson, the retired editor of Life magazine, was asked by the then-Secretary of the Smithsonian, S. Dillon Ripley, to produce a magazine "about things in which the Smithsonian [Institution] is interested, might be interested or ought to be interested."[4] Thompson would later recall that his philosophy for the new magazine was that it "would stir curiosity in already receptive minds. It would deal with history as it is relevant to the present. It would present art, since true art is never dated, in the richest possible reproduction
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Debrett's
Debrett's
Debrett's
(/dɪˈbrɛts/[2]) is a professional coaching company, publisher and authority on etiquette and behaviour,[3] founded in 1769 with the publication of the first edition of The New Peerage
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BBC
The British Broadcasting
Broadcasting
Corporation (BBC) is a British public service broadcaster. Its headquarters are at Broadcasting House
Broadcasting House
in Westminster, London
London
and it is the world's oldest national broadcasting organisation[3] and the largest broadcaster in the world by number of employees
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Janet Maslin
Janet R. Maslin (born August 12, 1949) is an American journalist, best known as a film and literary critic for The New York Times.[1][2] She served as a Times' film critic from 1977 to 1999 and a book critic from 2000 to 2015.[3][4] Biography[edit] Maslin graduated from the University of Rochester
University of Rochester
in 1970, with a B.A. degree and a major in mathematics.[5] She began her career as a rock music critic for The Boston Phoenix
The Boston Phoenix
and Rolling Stone. Maslin was the long-time film critic for The New York Times, serving from 1977 to 1999. Her film criticism career, including her embrace of American independent cinema, is discussed in the documentary film For the Love of Movies: The Story of American Film Criticism (2009)
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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