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Silver Slugger Award
The Silver Slugger Award
Silver Slugger Award
is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League
American League
and the National League, as determined by the coaches and managers of Major League Baseball (MLB)
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New York Yankees
The New York Yankees
New York Yankees
are an American professional baseball team based in the New York City
New York City
borough of the Bronx. The Yankees compete in Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) East division. They are one of two major league clubs based in New York City, the other being the New York Mets
New York Mets
of the National League. In the 1901 season, the club began play in the AL as the Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
(no relation to the modern Baltimore
Baltimore
Orioles)
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Outfielder
An outfielder is a person playing in one of the three defensive positions in baseball or softball, farthest from the batter. These defenders are the left fielder, the center fielder, and the right fielder. An outfielder's duty is to try to catch long fly balls before they hit the ground or to quickly catch or retrieve and return to the infield any other balls entering the outfield. Outfielders normally play behind the six other members of the defense who play in or near the infield. By convention, each of the nine defensive positions in baseball is numbered. The outfield positions are 7 (left field), 8 (center field) and 9 (right field)
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Seattle Mariners
Baseball
Baseball
Club of Seattle, LP, represented by CEO John Stanton[3][4] (90%) Nintendo of America
Nintendo of America
(10%)Manager Scott ServaisGeneral Manager Jerry DipotoPresident of Baseball
Baseball
Operations Kevin MatherThe Seattle
Seattle
Mariners are an American professional baseball team based in Seattle. The Mariners compete in Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
(MLB) as a member club of the American League
American League
(AL) West Division. The team joined the American League
American League
as an expansion team in 1977. Since July 1999, the Mariners' home ballpark has been Safeco Field, located in the SoDo neighborhood of Seattle. The "Mariners" name originates from the prominence of marine culture in the city of Seattle
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Texas Rangers (baseball)
The Texas
Texas
Rangers are an American professional baseball team based in Arlington, Texas, located in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex. The Rangers franchise currently competes in Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
as a member of the American League
American League
(AL) West division. Since 1994, the Rangers have played in Globe Life Park in Arlington
Globe Life Park in Arlington
in Arlington, Texas
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Second Baseman
In baseball and softball, second baseman is a fielding position in the infield, between second and first base. The second baseman often possesses quick hands and feet, needs the ability to get rid of the ball quickly, and must be able to make the pivot on a double play. In addition, second basemen are usually right-handed; only four left-handed throwing players have ever played second base since 1950.[1] In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the second baseman is assigned the number 4. Good second basemen need to have very good range, since they have to field balls closer to the first baseman who is often holding runners on, or moving towards the base to cover. On a batted ball to right field, the second baseman goes out towards the ball for the relay
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Home Run
In baseball, a home run (abbreviated HR) is scored when the ball is hit in such a way that the batter is able to circle the bases and reach home safely in one play without any errors being committed by the defensive team in the process. In modern baseball, the feat is typically achieved by hitting the ball over the outfield fence between the foul poles (or making contact with either foul pole) without first touching the ground,[1] resulting in an automatic home run. There is also the "inside-the-park" home run, increasingly rare in modern baseball, where the batter reaches home safely while the baseball is in play on the field. When a home run is scored, the batter is also credited with a hit and a run scored, and an RBI
RBI
for each runner that scores, including himself
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Batting Order (baseball)
In baseball, the batting order or batting lineup is the sequence in which the members of the offense take their turns in batting against the pitcher. The batting order is the main component of a team's offensive strategy. In Major League Baseball, the batting order is set by the manager, who before the game begins must present the home plate umpire with two copies of his team's lineup card, a card on which a team's starting batting order is recorded. The home plate umpire keeps one copy of the lineup card of each team, and gives the second copy to the opposing manager
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Designated Hitter
In baseball, the designated hitter rule is the common name for Major League Baseball
Baseball
Rule 5.11,[1] adopted by the American League
American League
in 1973. The rule allows teams to have one player, known as the designated hitter (abbreviated DH), to bat in place of the pitcher. Since 1973, most collegiate, amateur, and professional leagues have adopted the rule or some variant
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Pitcher
In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the pitcher is assigned the number 1. The pitcher is often considered the most important player on the defensive side of the game, and as such is situated at the right end of the defensive spectrum. There are many different types of pitchers, such as the starting pitcher, relief pitcher, middle reliever, lefty specialist, setup man, and closer. Traditionally, the pitcher also bats. Starting in 1973 with the American League
American League
and spreading to further leagues throughout the 1980s and 1990s, the hitting duties of the pitcher have generally been given over to the position of designated hitter, a cause of some controversy
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Right Fielder
A right fielder, abbreviated RF, is the outfielder in baseball or softball who plays defense in right field. Right field is the area of the outfield to the right of a person standing at home plate and facing towards the pitcher's mound. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the right fielder is assigned the number 9.Contents1 Position description 2 Hall of fame right fielders 3 Fictional right fielders 4 See alsoPosition description[edit] Right fielder
Right fielder
Giancarlo Stanton
Giancarlo Stanton
of the New York Yankees, seen here during his tenure with the Miami Marlins, signed the richest contract in sports history in 2014.Outfielders must cover large distances, so speed, instincts and quickness to react to the ball are key. They must be able to catch fly balls above their head and on the run, as well as prevent balls hit down the right field foul line from getting past them
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Center Fielder
A center fielder, abbreviated CF, is the outfielder in baseball who plays defense in center field – the baseball fielding position between left field and right field. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the center fielder is assigned the number 8. Position description[edit] Outfielders must cover large distances, so speed, instincts and quickness to react to the ball are key. They must be able to catch fly balls above their heads and on the run. They must be able to throw the ball accurately over a long distance to be effective. Novice players may find it difficult to concentrate on the game, since they are so far from the action. Emphasizing the correct position will give outfield players something to concentrate on at each pitch. As well as the requirements above, the center fielder must be the outfielder who has the best combination of speed and throwing distance
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Left Fielder
In baseball, a left fielder (LF) is an outfielder who plays defense in left field. Left field is the area of the outfield to the left of a person standing at home plate and facing towards the pitcher's mound. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the left fielder is assigned the number 7.Contents1 Position description 2 Notable left fielders 3 Position Transitions 4 References 5 See alsoPosition description[edit] Outfielders must cover large distances - speed, instincts, and quickness in reacting to the ball are key. They must be able to catch fly balls above their head and on the run
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Sterling Silver
Sterling silver
Sterling silver
is an alloy of silver containing 92.5% by weight of silver and 7.5% by weight of other metals, usually copper. The sterling silver standard has a minimum millesimal fineness of 925. Fine silver, for example 99.9% pure silver, is relatively soft, so silver is usually alloyed with copper to increase its hardness and strength. Sterling silver
Sterling silver
is prone to tarnishing[1], and metals other than copper can be used in alloys to reduce tarnishing, as well as casting porosity and firescale. Such metals include germanium, zinc, platinum, silicon, and boron
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Third Baseman
A third baseman, abbreviated 3B, is the player in baseball whose responsibility is to defend the area nearest to third base — the third of four bases a baserunner must touch in succession to score a run. In the scoring system used to record defensive plays, the third baseman is assigned the number '5'. The third baseman requires good reflexes in reacting to batted balls, as he or she is often the closest infielder (roughly 90–120 feet) to the batter. The third base position requires a strong and accurate arm, as the third baseman often makes long throws to first base. The third baseman sometimes must throw quickly to second base in time to start a double play. The third baseman must also field fly balls in fair and foul territory. Third base is known as the "hot corner", because the third baseman is relatively close to the batter and most right-handed hitters tend to hit the ball hard in this direction
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First Baseman
First base, or 1B, is the first of four stations on a baseball diamond which must be touched in succession by a baserunner to score a run for that player's team. A first baseman is the player on the team playing defense who fields the area nearest first base, and is responsible for the majority of plays made at that base. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the first baseman is assigned the number 3. Also called first sacker or cornerman, the first baseman is ideally a tall player who throws left-handed and possesses good flexibility and quick reflexes. Flexibility is needed because the first baseman receives throws from the other infielders, the catcher and the pitcher after they have fielded ground balls. In order for the runner to be called out, the first baseman must be able to stretch towards the throw and catch it before the runner reaches first base
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