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Silberling
Silberling
Silberling
is the colloquial name for the n-coaches of the Deutsche Bundesbahn, a type of regional passenger coach of which more than 7,000 units were built from 1958 to 1981. Nearly all of the coaches have undergone extensive modernisation – these modernised units are widely known as Mintling, Grünling ("greenling") or Rotling ("redling") after their exterior colours. The term Buntling ("colourfulling") is used to denote refurbished Silberling
Silberling
coaches in general.Contents1 Origin of the name 2 Technical data2.1 Type overview3 See alsoOrigin of the name[edit] The term Silberling
Silberling
derives from the coaches' stainless steel body which gave them a unique look during their term of service. Translated it means "silverling" in the English language
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Chasselas
Chasselas
Chasselas
or Chasselas
Chasselas
blanc is a wine grape variety grown in Switzerland, France, Germany, Portugal, Hungary, Romania, New Zealand and Chile. Chasselas
Chasselas
is mostly vinified to be a full, dry and fruity white wine
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Bible Translations Into German
German language translations of the Bible have existed since the Middle Ages. The most influential is Luther's translation, which established High German
High German
as the literary language throughout Germany by the middle of the seventeenth century and which still continues to be most widely used in the Germanic world today.Contents1 Pre-Lutheran German Bibles 2 Luther's Bible 3 Froschauer Bible 4 Other translations after Luther's 5 Mendelssohn 6 Later Bible translations 7 Contemporary Bible translations 8 Notes 9 References 10 See alsoPre-Lutheran German Bibles[edit]Page from the Wenceslas BibleThere are still approximately 1,000 manuscripts or manuscript fragments of Medieval German Bible translations
Bible translations
extant.[1] The earliest known and partly still available Germanic version of the Bible was the fourth century Gothic translation of Wulfila
Wulfila
(c. 311–80)
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Buffer (rail Transport)
A buffer is a part of the buffers-and-chain coupling system used on the railway systems of many countries, among them most of those in Europe, for attaching railway vehicles to one another. Fitted at the ends of the vehicle frames, one at each corner, the buffers are projecting, shock-absorbing pads which, when vehicles are coupled, are brought into contact with those on the next vehicle. The draw chain used between each pair of vehicles includes a screw which is tightened after coupling to shorten the chain and keep the buffers pressed together. Such is known as a 'screw coupling'. Historically, coupling chains were no more than that, a short length of heavy chain (typically three links long) with no adjustment
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UIC Passenger Coach Types
The UIC type X, Y and Z coaches are passenger coaches for international railway services that have been standardised in certain respects by the International Union of Railways (Union internationale des chemins de fer or UIC). In 1961 types X and Y were defined in UIC Leaflet 567, the type Z followed subsequently. This standardisation was intended to give rail passengers on international services a standard level of comfort; in addition it was intended to simplify the maintenance of coaches when abroad. One of the standards introduced was the use of rubber corridor connectors on gangways instead of bellows.Contents1 UIC type X 2 UIC type Y 3 UIC type Z 4 See also 5 SourcesUIC type X[edit] The UIC type X was based on the express coaches developed after the Second World War by the Deutsche Bundesbahn (DB)
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History Of Rail Transport In Germany
The history of rail transport in Germany
Germany
can be traced back to the 16th century. The earliest form of railways, wagonways, were developed in Germany
Germany
in the 16th century. Modern rail history officially began with the opening of the steam-powered Bavarian Ludwig Railway
Bavarian Ludwig Railway
between Nuremberg
Nuremberg
and Fürth
Fürth
on 7 December 1835. This had been preceded by the opening of the horse-drawn Prince William Railway
Prince William Railway
on 20 September 1831
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Rail Transport In Germany
As of 2015[update], Germany had a railway network of 33,331 km of which 19,983 km were electrified and 18,201 km were double track.[3] Germany is a member of the International Union of Railways (UIC)
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Kriegsbauart
The German term Kriegsbauart
Kriegsbauart
(wartime class) refers to railway goods wagon classes that were developed during the Second World War
Second World War
for the Deutsche Reichsbahn. The start of the war was an arbitrary dividing line for the classification of goods wagons, and did not represent any technological change. In the period shortly before the war, goods wagons were already being designed from a military perspective. This was particularly true for the stake wagons of 1938, which are occasionally referred to as a 'pre-war class' (Vorkriegsbauart) of wagons. The transition from the welded Austauschbauart
Austauschbauart
goods wagons to the first Kriegsbauart
Kriegsbauart
classes was therefore defined, not so much by design changes, but far more by a concentration on fewer types of wagons and their construction in greater numbers
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Gospel Of Matthew
The Gospel
Gospel
According to Matthew (Greek: Τὸ κατὰ Ματθαῖον εὐαγγέλιον, translit. Tò katà Matthaīon euangélion; also called the Gospel
Gospel
of Matthew or simply, Matthew) is the first book of the New Testament
New Testament
and one of the three synoptic gospels
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Judas Iscariot
Judas Iscariot
Judas Iscariot
(died AD c. 30 – c. 33) was one of the twelve original disciples of Jesus
Jesus
Christ and son of Simon Iscariot, according to the New Testament. Judas is known for the kiss and betrayal of Jesus
Jesus
to the Sanhedrin
Sanhedrin
for 30 silver coins.[1] His name is often used synonymously with betrayal or treason. Though accounts of his death are varied, the traditional version sees him as having hanged himself following the betrayal, as recorded in the Gospel
Gospel
of Matthew. His place among the Twelve Apostles was later filled by Matthias. Despite his notorious role in the Gospel
Gospel
narratives, Judas remains a controversial figure in Christian history
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Thirty Pieces Of Silver
Thirty pieces of silver
Thirty pieces of silver
was the price for which Judas Iscariot betrayed Jesus, according to an account in the Gospel of Matthew
Gospel of Matthew
26:15 in the New Testament.[1] Before the Last Supper, Judas is said to have gone to the chief priests and agreed to hand over Jesus
Jesus
in exchange for 30 silver coins, and to have attempted to return the money afterwards, filled with remorse. The Gospel of Matthew
Gospel of Matthew
claims that the subsequent purchase of the Potter's field
Potter's field
was fulfilment, by Jesus, of a prophecy of Zechariah.[2][3] The image has often been used in artwork depicting the Passion of Christ
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Stainless Steel
In metallurgy, stainless steel, also known as inox steel or inox from French inoxydable (inoxidizable), is a steel alloy with a minimum of 10.5% chromium content by mass.[1] Stainless steels are notable for their corrosion resistance, which increases with increasing chromium content. Molybdenum
Molybdenum
additions increase corrosion resistance in reducing acids and against pitting attack in chloride solutions. Thus, there are numerous grades of stainless steel with varying chromium and molybdenum contents to suit the environment the alloy must endure. Thus stainless steels are used where both the strength of steel and corrosion resistance are required. Stainless steel’s resistance to corrosion and staining, low maintenance, and familiar lustre make it an ideal material for many applications
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Passenger Car (rail)
A passenger car (known as a coach or carriage in the UK, and also known as a bogie in India[1]) is a piece of railway rolling stock that is designed to carry passengers. The term passenger car can also be associated with a sleeping car, baggage, dining, railway post office and prisoner transport cars. In some countries, such as the UK, some coaching stock (whether designed, converted or adapted) to not carry passengers are referred to as "NPCS" ( non=passenger coaching stock); similarly some maintenance (engineering) stock can be known as "MOW" - maintenance of way - in the US.Contents1 History1.1 19th century: First passenger cars and early development 1.2 1900-1950: Lighter materials, new car types 1.3 1950-present: High-technology advancements 1.4 Heavyweight vs
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Deutsche Bundesbahn
The Deutsche Bundesbahn
Deutsche Bundesbahn
or DB (German Federal Railway) was formed as the state railway of the newly established Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) on 7 September 1949 as a successor of the Deutsche Reichsbahn-Gesellschaft (DRG). The DB remained the state railway of West Germany
West Germany
until after German reunification, when it was merged with the former East German Deutsche Reichsbahn (DR) to form Deutsche Bahn AG, which came into existence on 1 January 1994.Contents1 Background 2 Organisation 3 1949-1970 4 1970-1993 5 Presidents of the DB 6 See also 7 External linksBackground[edit]Telegram announcing the formation of the Deutsche BundesbahnAfter World War II, each of the military governments of the Allied Occupation Zones in Germany
Germany
was de facto in charge of the German railways in their respective territories
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Railway Brake
Brakes are used on the cars of railway trains to enable deceleration, control acceleration (downhill) or to keep them standing when parked. While the basic principle is familiar from road vehicle usage, operational features are more complex because of the need to control multiple linked carriages and to be effective on vehicles left without a prime mover
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Wheelbase
In both road and rail vehicles, the wheelbase is the distance between the centers of the front and rear wheels. For road vehicles with more than two axles (e.g. some trucks), the wheelbase is defined as the distance between the steering (front) axle and the centerpoint of the driving axle group. In the case of a tri-axle truck, the wheelbase would be the distance between the steering axle and a point midway between the two rear axles. Wheelbase
Wheelbase
(measured between rotational centers of wheels)Contents1 Vehicles1.1 Varying wheelbases within nameplate 1.2 Bikes 1.3 Skateboards2 Rail 3 See also 4 ReferencesVehicles[edit] The wheelbase of a vehicle equals the distance between its front and rear wheels. At equilibrium, the total torque of the forces acting on a vehicle is zero
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