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Siggeir
Siggeir
Siggeir
is the king of Gautland (i.e. Götaland/Geatland, but in some translations also rendered as Gothland), in the Völsunga saga. In Skáldskaparmál
Skáldskaparmál
he is given as a Sikling and a relative of Sigar who killed the hero Hagbard. Hversu Noregr byggðist specifies that the last Sigar was Siggeir's nephew. According to the Völsunga saga, Siggeir
Siggeir
married Signy, the sister of Sigmund
Sigmund
and the daughter of king Völsung. At the banquet Odin
Odin
appears in disguise wearing a cape and a hood and sticks a sword in the tree Branstock. Then he said that whoever managed to pull the sword out could keep it. Siggeir
Siggeir
and everyone else tried but only Sigmund succeeded
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Götaland
Götaland
Götaland
(Swedish: [ˈjøːtaland] ( listen), also Gothia, Gothland,[2][3] Gothenland or Gautland) is one of three lands of Sweden
Sweden
and comprises ten provinces. Geographically it is located in the south of Sweden, bounded to the north by Svealand, with the deep woods of Tiveden, Tylöskog
Tylöskog
and Kolmården
Kolmården
marking the border. Götaland
Götaland
once consisted of petty kingdoms, and their inhabitants were called Gautar in Old Norse[clarification needed]. It is generally agreed that these were the same as the Geats, the people of the hero Beowulf
Beowulf
in England's national epic, Beowulf. A part of today's Götaland
Götaland
merged with Svealand
Svealand
around 1100 and thereby formed Sweden; other parts were at that time either Danish or Norwegian
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Poetic Edda
Poetic Edda is the modern attribution for an unnamed collection of Old Norse anonymous poems, which is different from the Edda, written by Snorri Sturluson. Several versions exist, all consisting primarily of text from the Icelandic medieval manuscript known as the Codex Regius. The Codex Regius
Codex Regius
is arguably the most important extant source on Norse mythology and Germanic heroic legends, and from the early 19th century onwards, it has had a powerful influence on later Scandinavian literatures, not merely by the stories it contains but also by the visionary force and dramatic quality of many of the poems. It has also become an inspiring model for many later innovations in poetic meter, particularly in Nordic languages, offering many varied examples of terse, stress-based metrical schemes working without any final rhyme by instead using alliterative devices and strongly-concentrated imagery
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Heimdallr
In Norse mythology, Heimdallr
Heimdallr
is a god who possesses the resounding horn Gjallarhorn, owns the golden-maned horse Gulltoppr, has gold teeth, and is the son of Nine Mothers (who may represent personified waves). Heimdallr
Heimdallr
is attested as possessing foreknowledge, keen eyesight and hearing, and keeps watch for the onset of Ragnarök
Ragnarök
while drinking fine mead in his dwelling Himinbjörg, located where the burning rainbow bridge Bifröst
Bifröst
meets heaven. Heimdallr
Heimdallr
is said to be the originator of social classes among humanity and once regained Freyja's treasured possession Brísingamen
Brísingamen
while doing battle in the shape of a seal with Loki. Heimdallr
Heimdallr
and Loki
Loki
are foretold to kill one another during the events of Ragnarök
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Forseti
Forseti
Forseti
( Old Norse
Old Norse
"the presiding one," actually "president" in modern Icelandic and Faroese) is the god of justice and reconciliation in Norse mythology. He is generally identified with Fosite, a god of the Frisians
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Dellingr
In Norse mythology, Dellingr
Dellingr
( Old Norse
Old Norse
possibly "the dayspring"[1] or "shining one"[2]) is a god. Dellingr
Dellingr
is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and in the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. In both sources, Dellingr
Dellingr
is described as the father of Dagr, the personified day. The Prose Edda
Prose Edda
adds that, depending on manuscript variation, he is either the third husband of Nótt, the personified night, or the husband of Jörð, the personified earth
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Bragi
Bragi
Bragi
is the skaldic god of poetry in Norse mythology.Contents1 Etymology 2 Attestations 3 Skalds named Bragi3.1 Bragi
Bragi
Boddason 3.2 Bragi
Bragi
son of Hálfdan the Old 3.3 Bragi
Bragi
Högnason4 References 5 Further readingEtymology[edit] Bragi
Bragi
is generally associated with bragr, the Norse word for poetry. The name of the god may have been derived from bragr, or the term bragr may have been formed to describe 'what Bragi
Bragi
does'. A connection between the name Bragi
Bragi
and Old English brego 'chieftain' has been suggested but is generally now discounted
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Baldr
Baldr
Baldr
(also Balder, Baldur) is a Æsir
Æsir
god of light, joy, purity, and the summer sun in Norse mythology, and a son of the god Odin
Odin
and the goddess Frigg. He is the father of Forseti, and He has numerous brothers, such as Thor
Thor
and Váli. In the 12th century, Danish accounts by Saxo Grammaticus
Saxo Grammaticus
and other Danish Latin chroniclers recorded a euhemerized account of his story. Compiled in Iceland
Iceland
in the 13th century, but based on much older Old Norse poetry, the Poetic Edda
Poetic Edda
and the Prose Edda
Prose Edda
contain numerous references to the death of Baldr
Baldr
as both a great tragedy to the Æsir and a harbinger of Ragnarök
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Æsir
In Old Norse, ǫ́ss (or áss, ás, plural æsir; feminine ásynja, plural ásynjur) is a member of the principal pantheon in Norse religion. This pantheon includes Odin, Frigg, Thor, Baldr
Baldr
and Týr.[1] The second pantheon is known as the Vanir. In Norse mythology, the two pantheons wage war against each another, which results in a unified pantheon. The cognate term in Old English
Old English
is ōs (plural ēse) denoting a deity in Anglo-Saxon paganism. The Old High German
Old High German
is ans, plural ensî.[2] The Gothic language
Gothic language
had ans- (based only on Jordanes
Jordanes
who glossed anses with uncertain meaning, possibly 'demi-god' and presumably a Latinized form of actual plural *anseis).[3] The reconstructed Proto-Germanic form is *ansuz (plural *ansiwiz)
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List Of Germanic Deities
In Germanic paganism, the indigenous religion of the ancient Germanic peoples that inhabited Germanic Europe, there were a number of different gods and goddesses. Germanic deities are attested from numerous sources, including works of literature, various chronicles, runic inscriptions, personal names, place names, and other sources. This article contains a comprehensive list of Germanic deities outside the numerous Germanic Matres and Matronae
Matres and Matronae
inscriptions from the 1st to 5th century CE.Contents1 Gods 2 Goddesses 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesGods[edit]Name Name meaning Attested consorts and sexual partners Attested children Attestations Baldr
Baldr
(Old Norse), Bældæg (Old English) Old Norse
Old Norse
form is contested
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Norse Mythology
Norse mythology
Norse mythology
is the body of myths of the North Germanic people stemming from Norse paganism
Norse paganism
and continuing after the Christianization of Scandinavia and into the Scandinavian folklore
Scandinavian folklore
of the modern period
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Þiðrekssaga
Þiðreks saga
Þiðreks saga
af Bern ('the saga of Þiðrekr of Bern', also Þiðrekssaga, Þiðriks saga, Niflunga saga or Vilkina saga, with Anglicisations including Thidreksaga) is an Old Norse
Old Norse
chivalric saga centering the character it calls Þiðrekr af Bern, who originated as the historical king Theoderic the Great
Theoderic the Great
(454–526), but who attracted a great many unhistorical legends in the Middle Ages. The text is either a translation of a lost Low German
Low German
prose narrative of Theoderic's life, or a compilation by a Norwegian or Icelandic scholar based on German material
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Nibelungenlied
The Nibelungenlied, translated as The Song of the Nibelungs, is an epic poem in Middle High German. The story tells of dragon-slayer Siegfried at the court of the Burgundians, how he was murdered, and of his wife Kriemhild's revenge. The Nibelungenlied
Nibelungenlied
is based on pre-Christian Germanic heroic motifs (the "Nibelungensaga"), which include oral traditions and reports based on historic events and individuals of the 5th and 6th centuries. Old Norse
Old Norse
parallels of the legend survive in the Völsunga saga, the Prose Edda, the Poetic Edda, the Legend of Norna-Gest, and the Þiðrekssaga. In 2009, the three main manuscripts of the Nibelungenlied
Nibelungenlied
were inscribed in UNESCO's Memory of the World Register
Memory of the World Register
in recognition of their historical significance.[1]First page from Manuscript
Manuscript
C (ca
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Norse Dragon
In Norse mythology
Norse mythology
there are several references to dragons (Old Norse: dreki). Níðhöggr
Níðhöggr
is identified as a dragon in the Völuspá Jörmungandr, also known as the Midgard
Midgard
Serpent, is described as a giant, venomous beast Fáfnir
Fáfnir
is turned into a dragon as part of the Völsung
Völsung
Cycle The Gesta Danorum
Gesta Danorum
contains a description of a dragon killed by Frotho IThis article relating to a Norse myth or legend is a stub
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Dwarf (Germanic Mythology)
In Germanic mythology, a dwarf is a human-shaped entity that dwells in mountains and in the earth, and is variously associated with wisdom, smithing, mining, and crafting. Dwarfs are sometimes described as short and ugly, although some scholars have questioned whether this is a later development stemming from comical portrayals of the beings.[1] Dwarfs continue to be depicted in modern popular culture in a variety of media.Contents1 Etymology
Etymology
and usage 2 Norse mythology
Norse mythology
and folklore 3 Anglo-Saxon medicine 4 Scholarly interpretations 5 Modern influence 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References Etymology
Etymology
and usage[edit] The modern English noun dwarf descends from the Old English
Old English
dweorg. It has a variety of cognates in other Germanic languages, including Old Norse dvergr and Old High German
Old High German
twerg
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Attila
Attila
Attila
(/ˈætɪlə, əˈtɪlə/; fl. circa 406–453), frequently called Attila
Attila
the Hun, was the ruler of the Huns
Huns
from 434 until his death in March 453. He was also the leader of a tribal empire consisting of Huns, Ostrogoths, and Alans
Alans
among others, on the territory of Central and Eastern Europe. During his reign, he was one of the most feared enemies of the Western and Eastern Roman Empires. He crossed the Danube
Danube
twice and plundered the Balkans, but was unable to take Constantinople
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