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Siberian Husky
The Siberian Husky
Husky
(Russian: Сибирский хаски) is a medium size working dog breed that originated in north-eastern Siberia, Russia.[2] The breed belongs to the Spitz
Spitz
genetic family.[3] It is recognizable by its thickly furred double coat, erect triangular ears, and distinctive markings. The original Siberian Huskies were bred by the Chukchi people
Chukchi people
— whose hunter-gatherer culture relied on their help. It is an active, energetic, resilient breed, whose ancestors lived in the extremely cold and harsh environment of the Siberian Arctic. William Goosak, a Russian fur trader, introduced them to Nome, Alaska
Nome, Alaska
during the Nome Gold Rush, initially as sled dogs
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Siberia
Coordinates: 60°0′N 105°0′E / 60.000°N 105.000°E / 60.000; 105.000SiberiaRussian: Сибирь (Sibir)Geographical region       Siberian Federal District        Geographic Russian Siberia        North AsiaCountry  Russia,  KazakhstanRegion North AsiaBorders on West: Ural Mountains North: Arctic
Arctic
Ocean East: Pacific
Pacific
Ocean South: Kazakhstan, Mongolia, ChinaParts West Siberian Plain Central Siberian Plateau others...Highest point Klyuchevskaya Sopka - elevation 4,649 m (15,253 ft)Area 13,100,000 km2 (5,057,938 sq mi)Population 36,000,000 (2017)Density 2.7/km2 (7/sq mi) Siberia
Siberia
(/saɪˈbɪəriə/; Russian: Сиби́рь, tr
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Agouti (coloration)
Agouti is a type of fur coloration in which each hair displays alternating bands of dark and light pigmentation. Agouti fur is the wild type pigmentation for many domesticated mammals. See also[edit]agouti Agouti gene, an important gene in the determination of coat colorReferences[edit]This vertebrate anatomy-related article is a stub
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Beringian Wolf
The Beringian wolf
Beringian wolf
is an extinct type of wolf ( Canis
Canis
lupus) that lived during the Ice Age. It inhabited what is now modern-day Alaska, Yukon, and northern Wyoming. Some of these wolves survived well into the Holocene. The Beringian wolf
Beringian wolf
is an ecomorph of the gray wolf and has been comprehensively studied using a range of scientific techniques, yielding new information on the prey species and feeding behavior of prehistoric wolves. It has been determined that these wolves are morphologically distinct from modern North American wolves and genetically basal to most modern and extinct wolves
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Genetic Admixture
Genetic admixture occurs when two or more previously isolated populations begin interbreeding.[1] Admixture results in the introduction of new genetic lineages into a population. It has been known to slow local adaptation by introducing foreign, unadapted genotypes (known as gene swamping). It also prevents speciation by homogenizing populations.Contents1 Examples 2 Mapping 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingExamples[edit] Genetic admixture often occurs when a geographic barrier separating populations, such as a river or isthmus, is removed or when anthropogenic activities result in movement of populations (for example invasive species). One example of genetic admixture resulting from the introduction of an invasive species is provided by the Cuban brown anole. Several isolated populations of this species exist in the native range of Cuba
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North Asia
Largest City NovosibirskMajor citiesBarnaul Chelyabinsk Irkutsk Kemerovo Khabarovsk Krasnoyarsk Novokuznetsk Novosibirsk Omsk Tomsk Tyumen Vladivostok Yakutsk Yekaterinburg OthersPopulation (2017) • Total 33,765,005Time zoneUTC+5 / MSK+2 UTC+6 / MSK+3 UTC+7 / MSK+4 UTC+8 / MSK+5 UTC+9 / MSK+6 UTC+10
UTC+10
/ MSK+7 UTC+11
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Shar Pei
4–6 puppiesClassification / standardsFCI Group 2, Section 2.1 Molossian: Mastiff type #309 standardAKC Non-Sporting standardANKC Group 7 (Non-Sporting) standardCKC Group 6 – Non-Sporting standardKC (UK) Utility standardNZKC Non-sporting standardUKC Northern Breed standardDomestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris)The Shar-Pei, is a breed of dog known for its features of deep wrinkles and a blue-black tongue. The breed originates from Canton, China. The English name (沙皮, pinyin: shā pí; probably derived from British spelling of the Cantonese
Cantonese
equivalent, sā pèih) translates to "sand skin" and refers to the texture of its short, rough coat
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Down Hair
Fur
Fur
is the hair covering of non-human mammals, particularly those mammals with extensive body hair that is soft and thick. The stiffer bristles on animals such as pigs are not generally referred to as fur. The term pelage – first known use in English c. 1828 (French, from Middle French, from poil for "hair", from Old French
Old French
peilss, from Latin
Latin
pilus[1]) – is sometimes used to refer to the body hair of an animal as a complete coat. Fur
Fur
is also used to refer to animal pelts which have been processed into leather with the hair still attached
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Guard Hair
Fur
Fur
is the hair covering of non-human mammals, particularly those mammals with extensive body hair that is soft and thick. The stiffer bristles on animals such as pigs are not generally referred to as fur. The term pelage – first known use in English c. 1828 (French, from Middle French, from poil for "hair", from Old French
Old French
peilss, from Latin
Latin
pilus[1]) – is sometimes used to refer to the body hair of an animal as a complete coat. Fur
Fur
is also used to refer to animal pelts which have been processed into leather with the hair still attached
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Moult
In biology, moulting (British English), or molting (American English), also known as sloughing, shedding, or in many invertebrates, ecdysis, is the manner in which an animal routinely casts off a part of its body (often, but not always, an outer layer or covering), either at specific times of the year, or at specific points in its life cycle. Moulting
Moulting
can involve shedding the epidermis (skin), pelage (hair, feathers, fur, wool), or other external layer. In some groups, other body parts may be shed, for example, wings in some insects or the entire exoskeleton in arthropods.Contents1 Examples 2 In birds2.1 Forced moulting3 In reptiles 4 In arthropods 5 In dogs 6 In amphibians 7 Gallery 8 References 9 External linksExamples[edit]Group Item shed Timing NotesCats Fur Usually around spring-summer time Cats moult fur around spring-summer time to get rid of their "winter coat"
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Patterns
A pattern is a discernible regularity in the world or in a manmade design. As such, the elements of a pattern repeat in a predictable manner. A geometric pattern is a kind of pattern formed of geometric shapes and typically repeated like a wallpaper design. Any of the senses may directly observe patterns. Conversely, abstract patterns in science, mathematics, or language may be observable only by analysis. Direct observation in practice means seeing visual patterns, which are widespread in nature and in art. Visual patterns in nature are often chaotic, never exactly repeating, and often involve fractals. Natural patterns include spirals, meanders, waves, foams, tilings, cracks, and those created by symmetries of rotation and reflection. Patterns have an underlying mathematical structure;[1] indeed, mathematics can be seen as the search for regularities, and the output of any function is a mathematical pattern
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Piebald
A piebald or pied animal is one that has a pattern of pigmented spots on an unpigmented (white) background of hair, feathers or scales. The spots are pigmented in shades of black and/or yellow as determined by the genotype controlling the color of the animal. The animal's skin underneath its coat may or may not be pigmented under the spots but the skin in the white background is not pigmented. Location of the pigmented spots is dependent on the migration of melanoblasts (primordial pigment cells) from the neural crest to paired bilateral locations in the skin of the early embryo. The resulting pattern appears symmetrical only if melanoblasts migrate to both locations of a pair and proliferate to the same degree in both locations
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Thule People
The Thule
Thule
(/ˈtuːli/ or /ˈθjuːl/)[1] or proto- Inuit
Inuit
were the ancestors of all modern Inuit. They developed in coastal Alaska
Alaska
by 1000 and expanded eastwards across Canada, reaching Greenland
Greenland
by the 13th century.[2] In the process, they replaced people of the earlier Dorset culture
Dorset culture
that had previously inhabited the region. The appellation "Thule" originates from the location of Thule
Thule
(relocated and renamed Qaanaaq
Qaanaaq
in 1953) in northwest Greenland, facing Canada, where the archaeological remains of the people were first found at Comer's Midden
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Hypopigmentation
Hypopigmentation
Hypopigmentation
is the loss of skin color. It is caused by melanocyte or melanin depletion, or a decrease in the amino acid tyrosine, which is used by melanocytes to make melanin.Contents1 Treatments 2 Associated conditions 3 See also 4 ReferencesTreatments[edit] Often, hypopigmentation can be brought on by laser treatments; however, the hypopigmentation can be treated with other lasers or light sources.[1] Associated conditions[edit] It is seen in:Albinism Idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis Leprosy Lleucism Phenylketonuria Pityriasis alba Vitiligo Angelman syndrome Tinea versicolor An uncommon adverse effect of imatinib therapySee also[edit]HyperpigmentationReferences[edit]^ Reszko, Anetta; Sukal, Sean A.; Geronemus, Roy G. (14 July 2008). "Reversal of Laser-Induced Hypopigmentation
Hypopigmentation
with a Narrow-Band UV-B Light Source in a Patient with Skin Type VI". Dermatologic Surgery
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Withers
The withers is the ridge between the shoulder blades of an animal, typically a quadruped. In many species it is the tallest point of the body, and in horses and dogs it is the standard place to measure the animal's height (in contrast, cattle are normally measured to the top of the hips).Contents1 Horses1.1 Conformational issues2 Dogs 3 Zebras 4 Medical problems 5 References 6 External linksHorses[edit] The withers in horses are formed by the dorsal spinal processes of roughly the 3rd through 11th thoracic vertebrae (most horses have 18 thoracic vertebrae), which are unusually long in this area. The processes at the withers can be more than 12 inches (30 cm) long. Since they do not move relative to the ground (as the horse's head does), the withers are used as the measuring point for the height of a horse. Horses are commonly measured in hands – one hand is 4 inches (10.16 cm)
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Escape Artist
Escapology
Escapology
is the practice of escaping from restraints or other traps. Escapologists (also classified as escape artists) escape from handcuffs, straitjackets, cages, coffins, steel boxes, barrels, bags, burning buildings, fish-tanks, and other perils, often in combination.Contents1 History 2 Societies 3 Forms of escape performance 4 In fiction 5 List of escape artists 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The art of escaping from restraints and confined spaces has been a skill employed by performers for a very long time
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