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Shrine Of The Morning Mist
Shrine of the Morning Mist
Shrine of the Morning Mist
(Japanese: 朝霧の巫女, Hepburn: Asagiri no Miko) is a Japanese manga written and illustrated by Hiroki Ugawa. The manga was serialized in Shōnen Gahōsha's Young King Ours. It is licensed in North America by Tokyopop
Tokyopop
and in Australia and New Zealand by Madman Entertainment. The manga was adapted into an anime series, directed by Yuji Moriyama. The anime was licensed in North America by Media Blasters. It tells the story of Yuzu Hieda, a high school freshman and one of three sisters, all of whom are miko at the local Shinto shrine. When her childhood love returns, it is discovered that dark gods have a great interest in him, and Yuzu is recruited to gather fellow students into a " Miko
Miko
Council" to fight off a full-scale mystic assault
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TOKYOPOP
Tokyopop, styled TOKYOPOP, and formerly known as Mixx Entertainment, is an American distributor, licensor, and publisher of anime, manga, manhwa, and Western manga-style works. The German publishing division produces German translations of licensed Japanese properties and original English-language manga, as well as original German-language manga
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Extraterrestrial Life
Extraterrestrial life,[n 1] also called alien life (or, if it is a sentient or relatively complex individual, an "extraterrestrial" or "alien"), is life that occurs outside of Earth
Earth
and that probably did not originate from Earth. These hypothetical life forms may range from simple prokaryotes to beings with civilizations far more advanced than humanity.[1][2] The Drake equation
Drake equation
speculates about the existence of intelligent life elsewhere in the universe. The science of extraterrestrial life in all its forms is known as exobiology. Since the mid-20th century, there has been an ongoing search for signs of extraterrestrial life. This encompasses a search for current and historic extraterrestrial life, and a narrower search for extraterrestrial intelligent life
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Jinja (Shinto)
A Shinto
Shinto
shrine (神社, jinja, archaic: shinsha, meaning: "place of the god(s)"[1]) is a structure whose main purpose is to house ("enshrine") one or more kami.[2] Its most important building is used for the safekeeping of sacred objects, and not for worship.[3] Although only one word ("shrine") is used in English, in Japanese Shinto
Shinto
shrines may carry any one of many different, non-equivalent names like gongen, -gū, jinja, jingū, mori, myōjin, -sha, taisha, ubusuna or yashiro. (For details, see the section Interpreting shrine names.) Structurally, a Shinto
Shinto
shrine is usually characterized by the presence of a honden[note 1] or sanctuary, where the kami is enshrined.[2] The honden may however be completely absent, as for example when the shrine stands on a sacred mountain to which it is dedicated, and which is worshiped directly
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Amulet
An amulet is an object that is typically worn on one's person and is alleged to have the magical power to protect its holder, either to protect them in general or to protect them from some specific thing; it is also used for decoration. [1] Amulets are different from talismans because a talisman may have alleged magical powers other than protection.[2] Amulets are sometimes confused with pendants, small aesthetic objects that hang from necklaces. Any given pendant may indeed be an amulet but so may any other object that purports to protect its holder from danger. Potential amulets include gems, especially engraved gems, statues, coins, drawings, pendants, rings, plant parts, animal parts, and even written words in the form of a magical spell or incantation to repel evil or bad luck
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Kami
Kami
Kami
(Japanese: 神, [kaꜜmi]) are the spirits or phenomena that are worshipped in the religion of Shinto. They can be elements of the landscape, forces of nature, as well as beings and the qualities that these beings express; they can also be the spirits of venerated dead persons. Many kami are considered the ancient ancestors of entire clans (some ancestors became kami upon their death if they were able to embody the values and virtues of kami in life). Traditionally, great or sensational leaders like the Emperor could be or became kami.[1][page needed] In Shinto, kami are not separate from nature, but are of nature, possessing positive and negative, and good and evil characteristics. They are manifestations of musubi (結び),[2] the interconnecting energy of the universe, and are considered exemplary of what humanity should strive towards
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Comedy
In a modern sense, comedy (from the Greek: κωμῳδία, kōmōidía) refers to any discourse or work generally intended to be humorous or amusing by inducing laughter, especially in theatre, television, film, stand-up comedy, or any other medium of entertainment. The origins of the term are found in Ancient Greece. In the Athenian democracy, the public opinion of voters was influenced by the political satire performed by the comic poets at the theaters.[1] The theatrical genre of Greek comedy can be described as a dramatic performance which pits two groups or societies against each other in an amusing agon or conflict. Northrop Frye
Northrop Frye
depicted these two opposing sides as a "Society of Youth" and a "Society of the Old".[2] A revised view characterizes the essential agon of comedy as a struggle between a relatively powerless youth and the societal conventions that pose obstacles to his hopes
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Tamagushi
Tamagushi
Tamagushi
(玉串, literally "jewel skewer") is a form of Shinto offering made from a sakaki-tree branch decorated with shide strips of washi paper, silk, or cotton. At Japanese weddings, funerals, miyamairi and other ceremonies at Shinto
Shinto
shrines, tamagushi are ritually presented to the kami (spirits or gods) by parishioners or kannushi priests. Contents1 Linguistic history 2 Etymology 3 The Ehime lawsuit 4 References 5 External linksLinguistic history[edit] The Japanese word tamagushi is usually written with the kanji tama 玉 "jade; gem; jewel; precious; ball; bead" and kushi 串 "string together; skewer; spit; stick", or sometimes written 玉ぐし with hiragana since the official Tōyō kanji
Tōyō kanji
do not include 串. The earliest recorded transcription of tamagushi is 玉籤, using kuji 籤 "bamboo slip; (divination) lot; written oracle; raffle; lottery" instead of kushi. The (ca
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UFOs
An unidentified flying object or UFO is a object perceived in the sky that is not readily identified. Most UFOs are later identified as conventional objects or phenomena
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Ofuda
O-fuda (御札 or お札, o-fuda) is a type of household amulet or talisman, issued by a Shinto shrine, hung in the house for protection, a gofu (護符). It may also be called shinpu (神符). It is made by inscribing the name of a kami and the name of the Shinto shrine
Shinto shrine
or of a representative of the kami on a strip of paper, wood, cloth, or metal.Contents1 Usage 2 See also 3 References 4 Further readingUsage[edit] The Ofuda
Ofuda
is customarily renewed annually before the end of a year, and then attached to a door, pillar, or ceiling. It may also be placed inside a private shrine (kamidana). It is believed to protect the family in residence from general harm, such as a disease. A more specific o-fuda may be placed near particular objects such as one for kitchen to protect from accidental fire. A popular o-fuda called jingū-taima (神宮大麻) or simply taima (大麻) is issued by Ise Shrine
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Anime
Anime
Anime
(/ˈænəˌmeɪ/ (Japanese: アニメ, [aɲime] ( listen), plural: anime))[a] is a style of hand-drawn and computer animation originating in, and commonly associated with, Japan. The word anime is the Japanese term for animation, which means all forms of animated media.[1] Outside Japan, anime refers specifically to animation from Japan
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Rosie Reyes
Rosa Maria "Rosie" Reyes Darmon (née Reyes; born 23 March 1939) is a retired tennis player from Mexico
Mexico
who was active in the 1950s and 1960s. Most of her success came on clay on which she won the women's doubles title at the 1958 French Championships with countrywoman Yola Ramírez.[1] She also reached the finals at the same event in 1957 and 1959. In singles, her best result at a Grand Slam tournament was reaching the semifinals of the 1959 French Championships in which she lost in straight sets to Zsuzsa Körmöczy
Zsuzsa Körmöczy
of Hungary. She competed in the women's doubles event at 1968 Summer Olympics, where tennis was reintroduced as an exhibition and demonstration event
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Chime (bell Instrument)
A carillon-like instrument with fewer than 23 bells is called a chime. American chimes usually have one to one and a half diatonic octaves. Many chimes are automated. The first bell chime was created in 1487.[citation needed] Before 1900, chime bells typically lacked dynamic variation and the inner tuning (the mathematical balance of a bell's complex sound) required to permit the use of harmony. Since then, chime bells produced in Belgium, the Netherlands, England, and America have inner tuning and can produce fully harmonized music.[1] Some towers in England
England
hung for full circle change ringing chime by an Ellacombe apparatus.[2] Notable chimes[edit]The Arma Sifton bells at the International Peace Garden, North Dakota, United States. The 14 bells by Gillett & Johnston were a gift from Central United Church of Brandon, Manitoba, in 1972
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Shannon Conley
Shannon Conley
Shannon Conley
is an American actress, voice actress, and vocalist based in New York City. She has done voice work in English dubs of Japanese anime for Central Park Media and NYAV Post
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Bakeneko
The bakeneko (化け猫, "changed cat") is a type of Japanese yōkai, or supernatural creature. According to its name, it is a cat that has changed into a yōkai
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Ryotaro Okiayu
Ryōtarō Okiayu
Ryōtarō Okiayu
(置鮎 龍太郎, Okiayu Ryōtarō, born November 17, 1969) is a Japanese voice actor and singer affiliated with Aoni Production.[2] His major roles include: Treize Khushrenada
Treize Khushrenada
in Mobile Suit Gundam Wing, Hisashi Mitsui
Hisashi Mitsui
in Slam Dunk, Meisuke Nueno in Hell Teacher Nūbē, Kunimitsu Tezuka
Kunimitsu Tezuka
in The Prince of Tennis, Byakuya Kuchiki in Bleach, Yuu Matsuura in Marmalade Boy, Shigure Sohma in Fruits Basket, Dark in D.N. Angel, and Toriko
Toriko
in Toriko. As a singer, he was part of the voice actor unit E.M.U (Entertainment Music Unit) with fellow voice actors Hikaru Midorikawa, Hideo Ishikawa, Nobutoshi Hayashi and Daisuke Sakaguchi, which was active from 1995 to 2000
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