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Shock Illustrated
Shock Illustrated
Shock Illustrated
was an American black and white magazine published by EC Comics
EC Comics
from late 1955 to early 1956. Part of EC's Picto-Fiction line, each magazine featured three to five stories. The artists drew one to four panels per page with the text overlaid onto the artwork. The first issue appeared with a cover date of September–October 1955 and featured three psychology-themed stories, similar in theme to the comic Psychoanalysis published by EC in 1955. Starting with the second issue this type of story was generally reduced to one per issue, with the remaining stories being similar in theme to those that appeared in EC's comic Shock SuspenStories.[1] Shock Illustrated
Shock Illustrated
ran for a total of three issues. The Picto-Fiction magazines lost money from the start, and when EC's distributor went bankrupt, the company had no choice but to cancel the prints
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EC Comics
Entertaining Comics, more commonly known as EC Comics, was an American publisher of comic books, which specialized in horror fiction, crime fiction, satire, military fiction and science fiction from the 1940s through the mid-1950s, notably the Tales from the Crypt series. In 1954–55, censorship pressures prompted it to concentrate on the humor magazine Mad, leading to the company's greatest and most enduring success. Initially, EC was privately owned by Maxwell Gaines and specialized in educational and child-oriented stories
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William Gaines
William Maxwell "Bill" Gaines (/ɡeɪnz/; March 1, 1922 – June 3, 1992), was an American publisher and co-editor of EC Comics. Following a shift in EC's direction in 1950, Gaines presided over what became an artistically influential and historically important line of mature-audience comics. He published the popular satirical magazine Mad for over 40 years. He was posthumously inducted into the comic book industry's Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame (1993) and the Jack Kirby Hall of Fame (1997). In 2012, he was inducted into the Ghastly Awards' Hall of Fame.Contents1 Early life 2 Army years and education 3 Early publishing career 4 Senate Subcommittee investigation 5 End of EC 6 Mad becomes a magazine 7 Business methods 8 Personal life 9 Notes 10 References 11 External linksEarly life[edit] Gaines was the son of Max Gaines, who as publisher of the All-American Comics division of DC Comics
DC Comics
was also an influential figure in the history of comics
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Terror Illustrated
Terror Illustrated was a black-and-white magazine published by EC Comics in late 1955 and early 1956. Part of EC's Picto-Fiction line, each magazine featured three to five stories. The format alternated blocks of text with several illustrations per page. The first issue appeared with a cover date of November–December 1955, but the second issue was the last. A third issue existed but was not printed by EC. The Picto-Fiction magazines lost money from the start, and the line was cancelled when EC's distributor went bankrupt. Terror Illustrated was edited by Al Feldstein. As with EC's comics, Feldstein was the most prolific writer of the title, and generally wrote up to three stories per issue. In addition to the stories credited to him, Feldstein also wrote under the pseudonyms Maxwell Williams and Alfred E. Neuman
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Graham Ingels
Graham
Graham
and Graeme may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Places2.1 Antarctica 2.2 Canada 2.3 United States2.3.1 Localities 2.3.2 Counties 2.3.3 Townships3 Other uses 4 See alsoPeople[edit] Graham
Graham
(given name), an English language given name Grae
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Angelo Torres
Angelo Torres
Angelo Torres
(born April 14, 1932 in Santurce, Puerto Rico)[1] is an American cartoonist and caricaturist whose work has appeared in many comic books, as well as a long-running regular slot in Mad.Contents1 EC Comics 2 Atlas Comics 3 Warren Publishing 4 Mad Magazine 5 Bibliography 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksEC Comics[edit] Torres was friends with artist Al Williamson
Al Williamson
in the early 1950s and occasionally assisted him on work for EC Comics
EC Comics
with fellow artists Frank Frazetta
Frank Frazetta
and Roy Krenkel
Roy Krenkel
(known as the Fleagle Gang). The story which was to be Torres' first solo EC story, "An Eye for an Eye" in Incredible Science Fiction
Incredible Science Fiction
#33 (Jan.-Feb
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Reed Crandall
Reed Leonard Crandall (February 22, 1917 – September 13, 1982)[1][2] was an American illustrator and penciller of comic books and magazines. He was best known for the 1940s Quality Comics' Blackhawk and for stories in EC Comics
EC Comics
during the 1950s
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Jack Kamen
Jack Kamen
Jack Kamen
(May 29, 1920 – August 5, 2008) was an American illustrator for books, magazines, comic books and advertising, known for his work illustrating crime, horror, humor, suspense and science fiction stories for EC Comics, for his work in advertising, and for the onscreen artwork he contributed to the 1982 horror anthology film Creepshow.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 EC Comics 4 Advertising art 5 Personal life 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Jack Kamen
Jack Kamen
was born to a Jewish family
Jewish family
in Brooklyn, New York
Brooklyn, New York
on May 29, 1920.[citation needed] Career[edit] Kamen's first professional job was as an assistant to a sculptor working for the Texas Centennial. He studied sculpture with Agop Agopoff and was a student of Harvey Dunn, George Brandt Bridgman and William C. McNulty
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Alfred E. Neuman
Alfred E. Neuman
Alfred E. Neuman
is the fictitious mascot and cover boy of the American humor magazine Mad. The character's face had drifted through U.S. iconography for decades before being claimed by Mad editor Harvey Kurtzman in 1954 and later named by the magazine's second editor Al Feldstein in 1956. Since his debut in Mad, Neuman's likeness has appeared on the cover of all but a handful of the magazine's 550+ issues, distinguished by jug ears, a missing front tooth, and one eye lower than the other
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Shock SuspenStories
Shock SuspenStories
Shock SuspenStories
was part of the EC Comics
EC Comics
line in the early 1950s. The bi-monthly comic, published by Bill Gaines
Bill Gaines
and edited by Al Feldstein, began with issue 1 in February/March 1952. Over a four-year span, it ran for 18 issues, ending with the December/January 1955 issue.Contents1 Artists and writers 2 Origin and major themes 3 Influences and adaptations 4 Controversies and demise 5 Reprints 6 Issue guide 7 SourcesArtists and writers[edit] Front covers were by Feldstein, Wally Wood, Johnny Craig, George Evans and Jack Kamen. Kamen was the comic's most prolific artist, usually doing the lead eight-page story in each issue. Other stories were illustrated by Craig, Evans, Wood, Graham Ingels, Jack Davis, Al Williamson, Joe Orlando, Reed Crandall, Bernard Krigstein
Bernard Krigstein
and Frank Frazetta
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Al Feldstein
Albert Bernard "Al" Feldstein (October 24, 1925 – April 29, 2014) was an American writer, editor, and artist, best known for his work at EC Comics and, from 1956 to 1985, as the editor of the satirical magazine Mad. After retiring from Mad, Feldstein concentrated on American paintings of Western wildlife.[1][2]Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life and career 1.2 EC Comics 1.3 Mad 1.4 Retirement2 References 3 External linksBiography[edit] Early life and career[edit] Al Feldstein was born October 24, 1925, in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Max, who made dental molds, and Beatrice Feldstein.[3] After winning an award in the 1939 New York World's Fair poster contest, he decided on a career in the art field and studied at the High School of Music and Art in Manhattan.[3] While in high school, he was hired by Jerry Iger to work in the S. M. Iger Studio,[2] a packager of comic-book stories supplying outsourced content to publishers entering the new medium
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Daniel Keyes
Daniel Keyes
Daniel Keyes
(August 9, 1927 – June 15, 2014) was an American writer who wrote the novel Flowers for Algernon
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George Evans (comics)
George R. Evans[1] (February 5, 1920- June 22, 2001)[2] was an American cartoonist and illustrator who worked in both comic books and comic strips. His lifelong fascination with airplanes and the pioneers of early aviation was a constant theme in his art and stories.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Comic books 2.2 Comic strips 2.3 Aviation art 2.4 Books and later career3 Death 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Born in Harwood, Pennsylvania,[2] Evans studied art from a correspondence course. He was still in his teens when he made his first sales, both illustrations and writing, to pulp magazines. Early in World War II, Evans was an aircraft mechanic at Shaw Field in South Carolina, where he sometimes flew in the planes he had worked on
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Al Williamson
Alfonso "Al" Williamson[1] (March 21, 1931[2] – June 12, 2010)[3][4] was an American cartoonist, comic book artist and illustrator specializing in adventure, Western and science-fiction/fantasy. Born in New York City, he spent much of his early childhood in Bogotá, Colombia
Colombia
before moving back to the United States at the age of 12. In his youth, Williamson developed an interest in comic strips, particularly Alex Raymond's Flash Gordon. He took art classes at Burne Hogarth's Cartoonists and Illustrators School, there befriending future cartoonists Wally Wood
Wally Wood
and Roy Krenkel, who introduced him to the work of illustrators who had influenced adventure strips. Before long, he was working professionally in the comics industry
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Gemstone Publishing
Gemstone Publishing is a U.S. company that publishes comic books and collectors' guides. The company was formed by Diamond Comic Distributors President and Chief Executive Officer Stephen A. Geppi. Gemstone published licensed Disney comic books
Disney comic books
from June 2003 until November 2008. The company has reprinted EC Comics
EC Comics
of the 1950s. Additionally, the company is the current home of The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide
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